1f physics (meas-instr)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

1f physics (meas-instr)

on

  • 156 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
156
Views on SlideShare
156
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    1f physics (meas-instr) 1f physics (meas-instr) Presentation Transcript

    • The World of PHYSICS… VARIOUS AND COMMON EXAMPLES OF MEASURING TOOLS: foot rule – simply known as ruler pull-push rule – known as the carpenter’s best friend
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: A vernier caliper is a wrenchlike tool that can directly measure small lengths. Once the caliper is adjusted to the width of the measured object, a reading is taken from a scale on the tool.
    • The World of PHYSICS… Slide rule - was a standard tool for engineers and scientists. Operating on the principle that all mathematical computations may be carried out on sets of sliding scales, the device looks
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: Beam Scale – is often found in doctor’s offices, the beam scale uses small adjustable weights called poises to balance the load. The weight is measured from markings on the beam.
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOLS:Outdoor Thermometer – like a red-dyed alcohol thermometer measures an outside air temperature of about 6° C (about 43° F). In a thermometer, an expanding fluid such as alcohol or mercury is trapped within a closed
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: Mercury and digital thermometers are the most common types of household devices for measuring body temperature.In mercury thermometers, an increase in warmth causes mercury to expand and rise in a glass tube. Digital thermometers
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: Most grandfather clocks are weight-driven, which means they are powered by the pull of a hanging weight. A mechanism called the escapement regulates the incremental release of the weight’s energy via toothed gears, which
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: Ornate sandglasses like this one were once used to mark the passage of minutes and hours. Flipping the glass causes the fixed amount of sand to pass though its narrow central hole in a consistent length of time, creating a relatively accurate measure. Generally called
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: This portable folding German sundial has a string gnomon (pointer), adjustable for accuracy at any latitude. As shadows fall across the sundial, the smaller dials show Italian and Babylonian hours. The dial also indicates the length of the day and the position of the sun in the
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: This Japanese clock was regulated by weights on a moving balance bar is called a lantern clock because of its distinctive shape. it features the one-hand design common in most clocks until the 1650s.
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: Portable clocks like the Nüremberg egg became possible with the development of coiled springs as a power source for timekeeping devices.
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: Liquid crystal forms from various organic substances and takes its name from the crystal-like properties of liquids whose molecular orientation changes when a small electric current is applied. It is used for digital
    • The World of PHYSICS… EXAMPLE OF MEASURING TOOL: NIST F-1, an atomic cesium fountain clock, replaces the NIST-7, which served as the primary United States time standard from 1993 to the end of 1999. The new atomic timekeeper is so accurate that it could run for nearly 20 million years without