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Values: A Manager's Guide

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A Managers Guide to a Cascading Team Values Conversation …

A Managers Guide to a Cascading Team Values Conversation

This is a guide for a manager to conduct a values conversation/ workshop with his or her team. The values conversation will take from 1 1/2 to 3 hours. The purpose is to clarify the values that will help the team move toward their highest level of performance.
In the conversation, the team will
• Explore their personal values about teamwork
• Create a team values statement
• Come to agreement about what those values mean in action

Table of Contents
Section 1 - Setting the Stage
• Values (sm)
• Leading a Values Conversation .
• Clarifying Your Values
• Values are the Foundation for Success
• Values Replace Rules
• Values Provide Guidance
• Aligned Values
• Change of Values
• Values Into Action
• Value Conflicts

Section 2 - Personal Values Exploration
• Cascading Valuessm to Your Team
• High Performance Team Exercise
• Introduction to the Values Cards
• Personal Values Exploration
• Using the Values Cards
• Arranging Your Values Cards
• Sorting Your Values
• Personal and Organizational Values
• My Top Six Values
• Discussion Questions
Section 3 - Creating Team Values
• Team Values Exercise
• Aligning Organizational & Team Values
• Values to Action
• Sample Value Statements
• Turning Insight Into Action

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  • 1. Values sm Managers Guide CASCADING TO TEAMS
  • 2. © 1996 &Printed in the U.S.A. Designed by Changeworks Solutions forThe Real Learning Company.This book may not be copied or reproduced by any method–photographic, electronic, or manual — in whole or in partwithout written permission.The Real Learning Co.1606 Juanita Lane, Suite CBelvedere, CA 94920(415) 435-6768rlico@aol.com
  • 3. Table of ContentsSection 1 - Setting the StageValuessm ...................................................................................................... 4Leading a Values Conversation ................................................................ 5Clarifying Your Values ............................................................................... 8Values are the Foundation for Success .................................................... 9Values Replace Rules ................................................................................ 10Values Provide Guidance ........................................................................ 11Aligned Values .......................................................................................... 12Change of Values ...................................................................................... 13Values Into Action .................................................................................... 14Value Conflicts .......................................................................................... 15Section 2 - Personal Values ExplorationCascading Valuessm to Your Team ........................................................ 16High Performance Team Exercise .......................................................... 19Introduction to the Values Cards ............................................................ 20Personal Values Exploration ................................................................... 20Using the Values Cards ............................................................................ 21Arranging Your Values Cards ................................................................. 21Sorting Your Values .................................................................................. 22Personal and Organizational Values ...................................................... 24My Top Six Values .................................................................................... 26Discussion Questions ............................................................................... 27Section 3 - Creating Team ValuesTeam Values Exercise ............................................................................... 28Aligning Organizational & Team Values .............................................. 29Values to Action ........................................................................................ 30Sample Value Statements ......................................................................... 31Turning Insight Into Action ..................................................................... 32Appendix:Explanation of Different Value Clusters ................................................ 35Social Responsibility: Yellow Cards ....................................................... 36Mastery: Orange Cards ............................................................................ 37Self Development: Green Cards ............................................................. 38Relationship: Blue Cards ......................................................................... 39Continuity: Pink Cards ............................................................................ 40Lifestyle: Purple Cards ............................................................................. 41
  • 4. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EValuessmA Managers Guide to a Cascading Team ValuesConversationYou have just experienced a Values workshop, where youexplored your own personal values, and related them to thevalues of your management team or organization.Many of you have found this process very meaningful. Now youwould like to bring the experience back to your work group orteam.This is a guide for a manager to conduct a values conversation/workshop with his or her team. The values conversation willtake from 1 1/2 to 3 hours.The purpose is to clarify the values that will help the team movetoward their highest level of performance.In the conversation, the team will• explore their personal values about teamwork• create a team values statement• come to agreement about what those values mean in action.This Guide offers the manager the skills and outlines the activi-ties that are needed to lead the conversation.4
  • 5. INTRODUCTIONLeading a Values ConversationLeading a Values ConversationConversationDialogue is “a free flow of meaning between people, in the sense of astream that flows between two banks. We are not trying to win in adialogue. We all win if we are doing it right. A new kind of mindcomes into being which is based on the development of a commonmeaning...People are no longer in primarily opposition, nor can theybe said to be interacting, rather they are participating in this pool ofcommon meaning, which is capable of constant development andchange. The purpose of dialogue is to reveal the incongruence in ourthought.” —Physicist David Bohm, quoted by Peter Senge, The Fifth Discipline.This is a Guide for conducting a conversation with your workteam. This is different from a traditional training program orworkshop in that you, the work group manager, will act as thefacilitator of the session, with your whole team. You will belearning together, in order to develop the capability and com-mitment in your team to achieve outstanding results. In anyconversation process the dialogue between people is where thediscovery begins and the learning takes place.This Guide invites you, as a manager, to initiate a conversationwith the people on your team.You have already experienced the Valuessm workshop on yourown, and created your management team’s, values. This Guidewill allow you to bring your own learning and insight to yourteam, while allowing your team to create their own values andreach their own conclusions. 5
  • 6. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EThese pages provide a structure and format for the experience.They are intended to create a give and take conversation withyou and your team. There is no right answer to the questionsposed, what is most important is taking an important issue andfinding out how it affects everyone.The Conversation process is designed so that you will hear fromeveryone about how values affect them, and will open up adialogue where people exchange different perspectives, feelingsand responses to each issue.Your role as a manager is changing. The traditional managerneeded to keep things steady, and accomplish a clear task. Thenew manager must be a change leader, a person who helps his orher team move into a new direction, with new rules, new ways,in an organization that is continually changing. As a teamorganization changes, you as a manager will have to lead yourgroup in changing. One of the ways that groups and teamschange is by shifting their values. So, even in you have alreadyadopted a team or organizational values statement, this work-shop will be helpful to reaffirm, change or modify your values inorder to fit your new vision and aspirations.6
  • 7. INTRODUCTIONLeading a Values ConversationListeningWe often set three simple rules for council: Speak honestly, be brief,and listen from the heart. —Lakota SiouxOne of the keys to conducting a conversation is your ability tolisten. Listening without having a stake in any particular out-come is the attitude that you need to bring to the conversation.Listening develops our ability to be empathetic and makedecisions which are shared and acted on by a group. Many timesbusiness decisions are not as good as they could be due to a lackof listening. Someone who is protecting a position has a ten-dency to block what the ears bring in. 7
  • 8. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E Clarifying Your Values“We’ve learned . . . that the A person’s values answer the question, “what’s important tosoft stuff and the hard stuff me?” Our values comprise the things that are most important toare becoming increasingly us. They are the deep-seated pervasive standards that influenceintertwined. A company’s almost every aspect of our lives: our moral judgments, ourvalues—what it stands for, responses to others, our commitments to personal and organiza-what it’s people believe in— tional goals. We all have belief systems we live by. Our beliefsare crucial to its competitive and value systems are deeply connected. We are motivated andsuccess. Indeed, values drive make decisions based on these belief systems and values. Oftenthe business.” these values are unconscious. Robert Haas If we all had the same values with the same priorities, it would Levi Strauss be easy to work in groups together. But in most teams, there is a Chairman CEO diversity of values and beliefs. In order to help us work better as a team and make decisions that lead to commitment and action, it is necessary to see the range of values that influence the decision-making process. Definition Values are defined by Webster’s dictionary as “a principle, standard, or quality considered inherently worthwhile or desirable.” The root for value is valor, which means strength. Values are sources of strength, because they give people the power to take action. Values are deep and emotional, and often difficult to change. 8
  • 9. SECTION 1Setting the StageValues are the Foundation for SuccessCentral to a company getting the job done today is its clarity “Values are the bedrock ofabout its values. Before mission, vision and strategy, a company any corporate culture. Asor group must come to agreement about what it stands for, in its the essence of a company’s philosophy for achievingdealing with customers and the community, and within itself, in success, values provide aits dealings with employees. As employees face increasing sense of common directionresponsibility, making more complex and far-reaching decisions, for all employees anda corporate values credo is an essential standard for behavior. guidelines for theirHow you achieve your goals and vision is as important as the day-to-day behavior.”goal itself. Julien PhillipsGroups have become concerned with defining their vision of thefuture, and their mission, a statement about their purpose. Thevision and mission are incomplete, in that they only define themajor external focus of task energy. In addition to its mission andvision, a group must also determine how they will work together,how they will treat each other, and what bonds them together.People work for different reasons, and want different thingsfrom each other and the organization. It is possible that a groupagrees on a vision and mission, but lapses into conflict becausedifferent people have different values about working together.Some members might want to work on their own, some wantlots of interaction, while others see the workplace as an arena forpersonal competition and “winning” through good results. Teamand individual values exploration will make these differencesexplicit, and lead to a shared team values statement. 9
  • 10. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EValues Replace RulesWhile there will always be differences of emphasis and increas-ing diversity of values among employees, the creation of consen-sus about key values is an important task for any group. Em-ployees at every level must face customers, must make costlydecisions, and deal with difficult balancing acts between compet-ing priorities. Previously, agreement was generated by havingstrict procedures and standards of behavior, under the control ofsupervisors. Today, with more empowerment and a greatersphere of autonomy for individual employees, people need to beguided not by rules, or by observation by a supervisor, but byunderstanding the most important values held by the organiza-tion. If a decision fits the values, then it is right.10
  • 11. SECTION 1Setting the StageValues Provide GuidanceValues are one of our most special achievements as humanbeings. A person acts not just in service to personal needs, butalso out of a broader sense of what is important and meaningful.In fact, values are the deepest and most powerful motivators ofpersonal action.Values represent an organizing principle for our lives, as well asfor an organization. What is most important to us to accomplish,and to do, at work, in our family, and in our personal life andcareer, can be described in relation to the values we want toachieve.Sometimes we mistakenly think of values as a series of“shoulds,” telling us what we can and cannot do. This is a verylimited way to see values. Rather, values are energizing, moti-vating and inspiring. When we care passionately about some-thing, e.g. value it, we can spur ourselves on to great achieve-ments. The highest achievements of people and organizationsarise when they feel inspired to accomplish something that fitstheir highest values. 11
  • 12. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EAligned ValuesWhen you work in an environment where your work activitiesare aligned with what you consider important, the energy,motivation, desire, and will to achieve even the most difficulttasks seems to emerge. Therefore, clarifying personal and workvalues can be a great resource for an organization.First we clarify our values for ourselves, and then with our teamand organization. Sometimes, our most important or mostneglected values remain somewhat hidden from us. Unclear orunknown values can produce conflicts and contradictions thatcan make people feel confused, blocked and frustrated.Values provide the foundation for an organization’s strategy,mission, and structure. Values are a set of understandings in anorganization about how to work together, how to treat otherpeople, and what is most important. These understandings formthe core values. In most organizations they are understood,implicit, but they are seldom discussed. Most organizational andteam values are unconscious, in that they lie below the surfaceand are not openly explored or discussed. Bringing them into thelight of day, enhances agreement and connection.12
  • 13. SECTION 1Setting the StageChange of ValuesValues are the meaning we attach to things. Our earliest valuesrevolve around our parents and the people who take care of us.As people grow they develop other values, these revolve aroundthings we learn about in the larger community and school. Theselearned values are associated with our basic growth and devel-opment. Later we develop values that are related to work,becoming independent and providing for yourself. Later onpeople develop values related to the human community ingeneral.In research conducted on American values, it was found thatuntil recently, values have remained quite stable over time. Thesix values ranked highest in 1968 (honesty, ambition, responsibil-ity, forgiveness, broad-minded, and courageous) were alsoranked highest in 1981. The least preferred values (imaginative,logical, obedient, intellectual, polite, independent) had similarstability. In this 13 year period it was also found that Americansociety was undergoing changes in certain values, there was ashift away from a collective norm to a more individualizedorientation.More recently, in our work with organizations, the newer valuesof teamwork, independence, and creativity have begun toemerge in lists of most important values. This signals somemajor value shifts in what people want from the workplace, andhow people want their organizations to be designed. They wantmore participation and creative involvement in defining not justwhat they do, but what the organization is all about — itsessence. 13
  • 14. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EValues Into ActionPeople assume certain basic values, rarely questioning them.People act out of their values, and different people value differentthings. In fact, values are motivators, since when we feel thatsomething is right and important we will spend a great deal ofeffort to achieve it. To be effective, a company needs someagreement about what it values. It has to turn these values, inturn, into policies, practices and standards for behavior. Acompany’s or group’s values thus focus the behavior of people inall of their activities.Questions for all groups to consider• What do we stand for?• How do we treat customers?• What do we mean by ethical behavior?• What core values are more important to us than profits?• How do we want to treat each other at work?• What do we offer our employees for their work effort?• How do we want to be seen by the community?• What attitudes and behavior in employees do we want to reward?14
  • 15. SECTION 1Setting the StageValue ConflictsSometimes values are espoused, or acted upon, which eithercontradict, or are in conflict with other values. These are valuesconflicts. What if a company values honesty, but also values ahigh sales volume? How or when does the value of honestysupersede the value of making a sale? Many companies havebeen deeply wounded by such value conflicts, most oftenbecause employees did not feel they had a forum to explore ordiscuss these conflicts. A values exchange and discussion iscritical to clarifying the limits of behavior and personal responsi-bility.For example, one company with a strong values orientationreported that they were given a huge order from a tobaccocompany, with the proviso that they eliminate their corporate nosmoking policy. The company debated the order within everywork group, balancing the need for the order with the challengeto its values. Finally, the different work groups achieved consen-sus that the value was more important than the sale, and theyturned it down rather than change their policy. 15
  • 16. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D ECascading Valuessm to Your TeamPurposeThis section provides an overview of the conversation processand desired outcomes; how to introduce the participants to eachother, and initiate conversations about values and the impact ofvalues on behavior and team performance.Participants will learn that the “soft stuff,” like values, is the“hard stuff” that makes or breaks high performing teams. Theywill learn to establish ground rules to create an environment thatmaximizes team learning and participation. They will also learnto create group accountability for learning within the workshopand on the job.Introduction and Overview of the SessionIt has been discovered that at the core of a high performing teamor organization lies a clear foundation of shared values, missionand vision. In order for every person to be on board to producehis or her highest level of performance, every individual con-tributor needs to understand and commit to the core values,mission and vision – what we call the essence – of the team andorganization.Our purpose here today is to create a container where we canwork together to agree upon and commit to a set of sharedvalues.16
  • 17. SECTION 2Personal Values ExplorationThe process will help you clarify what your values are, to agreeupon how we want to work together to achieve team goals. Wewill spend some time talking about what values are, and theimportance of shared values for high performing teams.The objectives of the conversation are:• To explore our own work values• To develop a set of values• To assess the extent to which we are living these values• To create an action plan that brings us closer to living in alignment with these values.Deliverables:• Ground Rules• Values Cards• Prioritized Personal Values• Team Values• Action PlanDialogue on QuoteI would like to ask each of you to reflect for a minute on thequote you see on the flipchart.Read the quote on the following page, or if desired post aprepared flipchart: 17
  • 18. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E“We’ve learned...that the soft stuff and the hard stuff are becomingincreasingly intertwined. A company’s values— what it stands for,what its people believe in—are crucial to its competitive success.Indeed, values drive the business.” – Robert Haas, Chairman/CEO, Levi StraussAsk a volunteer to start. Then proceed around the group eitherclockwise or counterclockwise, one at a time. Proceed brisklygetting data from each participant.Note:• Do not allow commenting, editing, or criticism of each other’s comments.• Practice active listening and summarize key points after everyone has spoken.• Summarize discussion by pointing out similarities and differences in themes.• Make the point that values are the basis of how we work together, and influence group effectiveness, creativity, and participation.Creating a Learning EnvironmentMuch of today will be similar to our first exercise — Today’ssuccess hinges on your participation. I will be tossing out ideasfor you to discuss or act upon, and then we will debrief what wehave learned as a group.18
  • 19. SECTION 2Personal Values ExplorationHigh Performance Team ExerciseExercise – 1We are now going to discuss the impact of values on teamperformance. To do that we will break into small groups of 3-4and share with each other successful team experiences. As youlisten to each other I would like you to capture key themes thatmade this a high performance team. Then select someone tosummarize your findings back to the large group.Think of a high performing team that you have been on. It couldbe school, athletic, civic, church, here, or at another job. Thinkabout what the team accomplished and what made the experi-ence memorable. Jot down the characteristics of this team.As a group I would like you to consider...What were the key characteristics that seemed consistent acrossall the experiences?Just as we have discovered similarities about high performanceteams, research has shown themes of what it takes to createeffective organizations. 19
  • 20. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EIntroduction to the Values CardsAlong with this booklet, there is a deck of different coloredcards. This deck of valuessm cards contains each important valueon one card. There are some reference cards as well.Personal Values ExplorationExercise – 2Use the Values Cards for personal self-exploration or as a tool forbuilding a work team. Clarifying values for a team and organiza-tion is an essential activity within an organization. When peopleagree on what is most important to them, a shared commitmentcan grow.Like all tools, the cards do nothing by themselves, but ratherhelp you to clarify your thoughts. The values cards evolved as atool for helping people clarify their values. In the beginningwhen we asked people about their key values, we found thatsome people had difficulty coming up with a comprehensive list.So, after years of sorting we brought together the most com-monly expressed values on cards to help people focus on what isimportant to them.20
  • 21. SECTION 2Personal Values ExplorationUsing the Values CardsThere are 48 cards, each one representing a particular value.Each value has an icon, like the suit from a deck of cards, whichindicate different categories of values. There are five additionalcolumn heading cards labeled as follows:Always ValuedOften ValuedSometimes ValuedSeldom ValuedLeast ValuedThere is a card labeled WILD CARD. If you have an importantvalue that is not represented in the deck, you can add your ownvalue by writing it in on the wild card.Arranging Your Values Always Often Sometimes Seldom Least Valued Valued Valued Valued Valued Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value Value WILD Value CARD My Own Valuecdasr 21
  • 22. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D ESorting Your ValuesBegin your personal values exploration by taking the five whitecards that are labeled, Always to Never, and spread them out ina row (with the Always card to the upper left hand corner), sothat each one will become the top card of five columns. Placeeach value card below the card that indicates how central orimportant that value is in your life. Sort the cards so there are nomore than ten in each column. It will take some time, and youwill probably end up moving your cards back and forth betweencolumns. See the arrangement diagram on the previous page fora picture of how the sorted values columns will look.At first you may feel that all the values are important to you, andyou will want to put most of them under the “Always” or“Often” valued columns. But remember, the purpose of thevalues sort is to indicate your values in order of their importanceto you, at this time in your life. There have to be some lessimportant values, because you have to set priorities in your life.When sorting your values, try to think of specific examples ofhow that value applies to your life. If you can’t think of a specificexample, it probably is not your highest priority value.Sort all 48 values cards into five stacks of ten or fewer cards ineach. Have people sort cards on the tables, and put their tentname cards on the top of their card sort. When they are finished,encourage people to step back from their sorted values whenthey are done.While the group is working on the activity, explain the non-judgmental nature of values.22
  • 23. SECTION 2Personal Values ExplorationThere are no good/bad, right/wrong values. It is just thatpeople think/feel certain values are more important than others.Many conflicts and clashes in society are really values conflicts.Explain what the different colors of the cards mean. (optional,use a flipchart)Ask them to think about the predominance and/or lack of anycolor(s) in their personal sort and what that might mean.Yellow: Social ResponsibilityOrange: MasteryGreen: Self DevelopmentBlue: RelationshipPink: ContinuityPurple: LifestyleAfter you have sorted the cards into the columns, try to arrangethe cards in each column from most important to least impor-tant. In that way, you will ultimately have sorted all 48 valuesfrom most to least important. This exercise will help you deter-mine which are the central values guiding your life. 23
  • 24. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E Personal and Organizational Values“If employees know what One of the most important factors leading to greater teamtheir company stands for, effectiveness is a close link between personal and organizationalif they know what stan- values. Survey data by the American Management Associationdards they are to uphold, from 1,460 managers and chief executives suggests that anthen they are much morelikely to make decisions understanding of this relationship will provide new leverage forthat will support those corporate vitality. This relationship, when mismanaged, canstandards. They are also provide the breeding ground for conflict and cynicism. Themore likely to feel as if survey provided solid evidence that common values between thethey are an important part individual and the company are a major source of personalof the organization. They satisfaction and organizational effectiveness.are motivated because lifein the company has The same report by the American Management Associationmeaning for them. “ showed that when managers’ values were congruent with the Terrence E. Deal and values of their companies, their personal lives were in better Allan A. Kennedy shape, their approach to their job more optimistic, and their Corporate Cultures stress lower. A person’s sense of what is important strongly influences his/her commitment and motivation. When you work in an environment where your work activities are aligned with what you consider important, the energy, motivation, desire, and will to achieve even the most difficult tasks, seems to emerge. Therefore, clarifying personal and work values can be of great benefit for a project team. 24
  • 25. SECTION 2Personal Values ExplorationNow we will move from personal values to create a set of sharedvalues for your team values that you all agree to commit to. Givean example of one of your work values and how you make thatvalue come to life.Discuss:What values do you need to express to be a high performingparticipant on this team?How would others know that value was important to me byobserving my behavior? 25
  • 26. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E My Top Six Values In the space below, list your top six values. After writing down each value, write a specific example of how you express that value in your work (or in your life), and perhaps also some of the additional ways that you might act or express that value more deeply. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.26
  • 27. SECTION 2Personal Values ExplorationDiscussion QuestionsYou can sort the values cards in a number of different ways.Instead of just asking for your most important values, you cansort the cards in answer to a number of other questions. Forexample, you might ask• Which values are you the most proud of?• Which values are the easiest to demonstrate?• If I was able to watch you during the day, what behaviors would I notice that demonstrate your commitment to this value? 27
  • 28. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D ETeam Values ExerciseExercise – 3Individually, sort the cards to identify the top six values that aremost important for your success on this team. Ask yourself,“What values do I need to express to be high-performing mem-ber of this team?” “How would others know that value wasimportant to me by observing my behavior?”Then, each person on the team will share the six values selected.Notice the similarities and differences. As a team, reach consen-sus on the six most important values necessary to create a highperformance team. Try to not vote, but to dialogue towardconsensus.Write the values on the center of the map (core team values).Ask clarifying questions to help participants understand whateach value means.Now enter the team values on the value notes card and answerthe two questions on the back:• Which values(s) does the team sometimes neglect?• What will you commit to do to ensure this values is practiced more often?Discuss these answers in your group.28
  • 29. SECTION 3Creating Team ValuesAligning Organizational Team ValuesExercise – 4Now its time to align the core team values with theorganization’s values.In your prior session you worked with others to create a set oforganizational values. Share those with your team. Comparethe similarities and differences between the teams’ core valuesand those of the organization.Ask the following questions:1. Discuss your thoughts about the organizations values.2. How do we ensure our team is aligned with the values of the organization?Have them enter the organization’s values on their matrix cardand answer the two questions on the back.If these values were practiced....what kind of behavior wouldyou see more of? What kind of behavior would you see less of?Discuss these in your group. 29
  • 30. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D EValues to ActionExercise – 5Write the six team values on a flipchart or a piece of paper: Askthe team to assign a 1-10 rating on how well we practice eachvalue. Depending on the size of your team, you may choose toassign each value to a small group and have them answer thefollowing questions:1. On a scale of 1-10 (10 high), I would say we practice living this value...2. What behaviors do we need to see more of to fully realize this value? List them.3. What behaviors do we need to eliminate to better realize this value? List them.4. Because we value..., we commit to...Generate an agreement for the team from the behaviors listedabove and the commitments needed to support them.30
  • 31. SECTION 3Creating Team ValuesSample Value StatementsCreativity We seek and promote an environment which is conducive to imaginative thinking.Fairness We recognize people as individuals, acknowledge their differences, and interact with them accord- ingly.Integrity Our actions are always aligned with our beliefs.Honesty We have the courage and tactfulness to be honest with ourselves and others to achieve positive results.orAchievement Because we value achievement, we commit to:• Set challenging goals for ourselves, teams, and the depart- ment• Accomplish or exceed those goals• Recognize and celebrate contributions of individuals and teamsCommunication Because we value teamwork, we commit to:• Identify and respect roles which utilize and develop individual abilities to best achieve a common goal. 31
  • 32. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D ETurning Insight Into ActionExercise – 6Looking at the listing of supporting behaviors and the degree towhich we live the value, ask the whole group:What seems to be the most important value for this group towork on to move to the next level of effectiveness as a team?Work with the group to prioritize the values into a manageablenumber.Assign a value to each group.Now, come up with specific action items or plans for a value.For example, if you come up with general items such as “buildbetter communication”, the specific action steps would beactivities like “hold weekly meetings with project design team.”Groups should ask themselves these questions:• What’s the first step?• Who will be responsible for making this happen?• When will it be accomplished?• How will you know when this action item is complete?32
  • 33. SECTION 3Creating Team ValuesWrite specific actions for each value on a page. Action Step: Who: When:Seek out group commitment to each action item.Try to get agreement on each action item. Remember... Silencedoes not imply agreement! If there isn’t commitment to theaction item it will fail. It is better to have one or two successfulactions with no failures at this point rather than a long list offailures.If a small group is quiet, probe for the unsaid.• Are we really committed to this action item?• If not, what’s not being said?• What is keeping information unsaid?Write the answers to these questions beneath the action item.Ask small groups to present action items to large group. 33
  • 34. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D ELet’s have some thunderous applause for completing such achallenging task!I want to remind you that we will be having a follow up meetingto measure our progress on these action items.Ask everyone to return to their places in the circle. Ask ques-tions on content, insights, a-ha’s.ClosingAsk:• What about today was most worthwhile?• What do we need to do to follow it up?• What did you learn about yourself, the group and the way you work together?34
  • 35. APPENDIXAppendix:Explanation of Different Value ClustersValues mean different things to different people. Some valuesrepresent ideals that we experience as just good in themselves.These are end values, or what have been termed intrinsic values.Other values pertain to how one should do things, the style ofaction and relationships to others. These are called instrumentalvalues. The following model represents one way that we havefound useful to classify different types of values.Different values categories appear on different cards of differentcolors. Each color represents a specific category. There are sixareas in which the values are divided. Each represents a differentdirection, or preference set. The main categories are I. Social Responsibility YellowII. Mastery OrangeIII. Self Development GreenIV. Relationship Blue V. Continuity PinkVI. Lifestyle PurpleThe center of the model is one’s long standing social values, theones that are central to maintaining civilization. Clusteredaround this group are four areas: Mastery, Self-Development,Relationships, and Continuity. These represent four differentdirections in which a person develops values. Each cluster is animportant area of development, none more important thananother. Surrounding the values clusters is the Lifestylecluster — the choices related to how one lives life. There aremany choices which tend to have more or less importance basedon where one is in his or her life cycle. 35
  • 36. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E Social ResponsibilityCluster I: Yellow CardsThe values in this group are often considered good in them-selves. There is no way to argue or prove, for example, that“tolerance” is more important than “tradition” or “family.” Eachperson simply holds one value more strongly than another,period.It should be noted that very few people would consider any ofthese values unimportant. However, since we only have a finiteamount of time, life consists of making choices about how wespend our time and energy. Using the Values Cards will enableyou to look at which of these values are of most central impor-tance to you in your life. You may find that there are some valuesin this category which you consider important, but do not domuch about, and there will be others where you focus most ofyour energy.Fairness Equal oppor tunityHonesty Sincerity, truthfulnessTolerance Respectful of differencesCourageous Standing up for your beliefsIntegrity Acting in line with your beliefsForgiveness Able to pardon others and let go of hurtPeace Freedom from war and armed conflictEnvironment Respecting the future of the ear th36
  • 37. APPENDIX MasteryCluster II: Orange CardsThese values represent the achiever, individualistic pursuits,where success is defined in terms of mastery, status, power andposition. This value cluster focuses on achievement in theexternal world. People motivated by these values want to havevisible achievements, and they want these recognized by others.They want to be in a position of authority, and to be seen as“winners” in competitive situations.The specific values associated with this cluster include thefollowing cards:Competence Being good at what I do, capable, ef fectiveAchievement Successful completion of a visible task or projectAdvancement Getting ahead, ambitious, aspiring to higher levelsIntellectual Status Being regarded as an exper t, a person who knowsRecognition Getting noticed for effective effortsAuthority Having the power to direct events, make things happenPower Control over other people, making them do what I wantCompetition Winning, doing better than others 37
  • 38. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E Self DevelopmentCluster III: Green CardsThese values represent the search for personal challenge, creativityand self-development. This cluster is associated with experientiallearning, inner-development, self-actualizing, or seeking. Theperson with these values wants to be involved in challenging andmeaningful projects that expand his or her capacities. Such peopleseek new experiences, and personal development activities.The specific values associated with this style include the followingcards:Challenge Testing limits, strength, speed and agilitySelf-Acceptance Self-respect, self-esteemKnowledge Seeking intellectual stimulation, new ideas, truth and understandingAdventure Challenge, risk-taking, testing limitsCreativity Finding new ways to do things, innovativePersonal Growth Continual learning, development of new skillsInner Harmony Freedom from inner conflict, integrated, wholeSpiritual Growth Relationship to higher purpose, divine being38
  • 39. APPENDIX RelationshipCluster IV: Blue CardsThese values represent people whose primary motivation is seenin terms of developing personal relationships, helping andworking with other people, feeling part of a group or team, andsharing experience. People who have a number of values in thiscluster seek validation from other people, and define theirachievements in terms of what they have done for and withothers. They seek contact, communication and community atwork. They value their standing with others. The specific valuesassociated with this style include the following cards:Belonging Being connected to and liked by othersDiplomacy Finding common ground with difficult people and situations, resolving conflictTeamwork Cooperating with others toward a common goalHelping Taking care of others, doing what they needCommunication Open dialogue, exchange of viewsFriendship Close companionship, ongoing relation- shipsConsensus Making decisions everyone can live withRespect Showing consideration, regarding with honor 39
  • 40. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D E ContinuityCluster V: Pink CardsThis cluster refers to values which focus on enduring qualities.This cluster is associated with an appreciation of ongoingtradition, knowing where things fit and how people will treateach other. A person with these values does not like surprises orthings out of order.Tradition Respecting the way things have always been doneSecurity Freedom from worry, safe, risk freeStability Certainty, predictabilityNeatness Tidy, orderly, cleanSelf-Control Restrained, self-disciplined, unemo- tionalPerseverance Pushing through to the end, completing tasksRationality Consistent, logical, clear reasoning40
  • 41. APPENDIX LifestyleCluster VI: Purple CardsThis cluster has to do with values that are related to choice oflifestyle. They focus on preference for a certain style of activity.Many value disputes are about differences in preferences. Thiscategory has to do with values about personal style that refer tothe ways that people work and live. It has to do with personalappearance and the way that a person approaches the world. Thespecific values associated with this cluster include the followingcards:Health Maintain and enhance physical well- beingPleasure Personal satisfaction, enjoyment, delightPlay Fun, lightness, spontaneityProsperity Flourishing, being well-off, af fording what I wantFamily Taking care of and spending time with loved onesAppearance Looking good, dressing well, keeping fitIntimacy Deep emotional, spiritual connectionAesthetics Desire for beautyCommunity Living where neighbors are close and involved 41
  • 42. V A L U E S SM M A N A G E R G U I D ENotes:42
  • 43. APPENDIXNotes: 43
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