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Mow no more 9102011

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A Homeowner's journey replacing their lawn

A Homeowner's journey replacing their lawn

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    Mow no more 9102011 Mow no more 9102011 Presentation Transcript

    • Mow No More Death of a Lawnmower September 10, 2011 A Homeowner’s Journey to Replacing their Lawn
    • Home, Sweet Home - Before
        • Each week, 54 millon Americans mow their lawn each week using 800m gallons of gas per year
          • EPA states that a traditional gas powered lawn mower produces as much air pollution as 43 new cars being driven 12,000 miles per year.
        • 100 million pounds of pesticides are used by homeowners each year.
          • Heavier applications per acre than most other land areas
          • 30 commonly used lawn pesticides are linked to:
            • Cancer
            • Detected in ground water
            • Ability to leach into drinking water
            • Toxic to fish, bees or birds
      • WITH OUR CONSERVATIVE WATER USE, THE ONLY WAY TO AVOID PENALTY FOR NOT REDUCING WATER USE BY 20% WAS TO STOP WATERING LAWN AREA.
      Replaced this too!
    • Getting the ‘Hardscape’ Ready
        • Integrated into our plan was permanable hardscapes, such as paths and walkways and a dry creek bed in the back yard
        • We also included a sitting area covered in crushed gravel. For this we added a recycled plastic barrier underneath to make it a little more durable
        • Concrete pavers were separated by free floating river rock
    • ‘ Noddles’ of Cardboard
        • Often, Sheet Mulching is called Lasagna Gardening – our ‘noodles’ are made out of cardboard appliance boxes which were applied directly onto the remaining mowed grass
        • Since the grass hadn’t been watered for six to nine months – we watered regularly for 3 weeks to ‘wake up’ the organisms before laying the cardboard down.
        • With the cardboard in place, we gave it a good soaking before adding a 3 inch layer of OMRI rated compost
          • We choose OMRI rated compost because we planned to integrate edibles into the garden
    • Compost Happens … especially when you have a teenager
    • The ‘Cheese’ on top
        • In Lasagna Gardening the compost is ‘topped’ by a mulch. We used ‘Ecomulch a great local company
        • Notice the PVC pipes that my husband used to temporary flag the existing sprinkler heads
          • These were converted to drip irrigation using replacement heads
    • Lots of Cheese
        • Few of the perennial plants made it through the ‘no water’ period’
          • Bring on the drought tolerant and native plants!
    • Front Yard on a Shoestring
          • In order to save money we shopped local plant sales:
            • The Garden at Heather Farm
            • Diablo Valley College
            • Contra Costa Master Gardeners
            • Morningsun Herb Farm
            • In order to save energy, we planted 4 – 6 inch starts
              • Small size allowed us to plant in compost without cutting cardboard (move the mulch aside)
              • Planted 66 plants in one afternoon
              • Planted in October 2010
              • and one year later…
    •  
    • FILLED WITH… HEIRLOOM APPLE TREES HEIRLOOM PEACH TREE PURPLE SAGE CHIVES, THYME, ROSEMARY SALVIAS GET MORE IDEAS: PLANTS AND LANDSCAPES FOR SUMMER-DRY CLIMATES OF THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION , Now a Thriving Garden
    • Every Choice Counts www.SustainableDanville.com