How to Rock a Presentation by Cynthia Hartwig at Two Pens

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Cynthia Hartwig shares hard won presentation experience gained over 30 years of advertising and business communication pitches in How to Rock a Presentation. Learn how to make blended presentations, …

Cynthia Hartwig shares hard won presentation experience gained over 30 years of advertising and business communication pitches in How to Rock a Presentation. Learn how to make blended presentations, get away from being enslaved by PowerPoint, and figure out how to tell stories that make an audience connect with you.

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  • 1. How to Rock a Presentation March 5, 2014 Cynthia Hartwig
  • 2. A Modest Proposal from John Bohannon TED Video http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/john_bohannon_
  • 3. Class covers these topics. 1. Presentation zen. 2. Presentation logistics. 3. The art of storytelling. 4. Personal tune-up.
  • 4. WRITING PRACTICE 101 1. Keep your hand moving. No stopping. 2. No crossing out, no editing, no worries about grammar or spelling. 3. This is about thinking on paper.
  • 5. Write about your worst or best presentation experience.
  • 6. The Zen of Meeting and Presentation Control
  • 7. Become an expert on the business.
  • 8. You are helping your audience. Erase all thoughts of selling.
  • 9. At most companies, the enemy is routine. Clients should ask, “What are they going to do next?” Not, “When will this be over.”
  • 10. Figure out what you want to accomplish BEFORE a meeting.
  • 11. 24 hours before is optimal. One hour before is doable.
  • 12. Team presentations are intrinsically interesting.
  • 13. Each person has a presenting persona. Figure out yours.
  • 14. Ways to reveal information:
  • 15. Ways to reveal information: If people know you and like you, you can present the recommendation first, then make the case.
  • 16. Ways to reveal information: If people don’t know you or are hostile, you need to work up to the recommendation with proof.
  • 17. Blended presentations make more interesting meetings.
  • 18. Decide on each person’s role up front. When organizing, use the same philosophy as setting up a group photo.
  • 19. Lizzy O’Leary on “How to Tell a Story with Numbers” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_kMydB5l9Ns
  • 20. Everyone must have a part. Bring people up or back based on time on stage.
  • 21. • Stories • Whiteboards • Group exercises, brainstorms, mind-mapping, games, writing… • Videos or audio clips
  • 22. Argue before the meeting. You are best friends in the meeting.
  • 23. Aim for content that’s 70% visual, 30% words. .
  • 24. Boards/Slides, Story Telling or Whiteboard? • Use boards and slides to educate.
  • 25. Boards/Slides, Stories or Whiteboard? • Use boards and slides to educate. • Use storytelling to get people on your side, excite them and persuade them.
  • 26. Boards/Slides, Stories or Whiteboard? • Use boards and/or slides to educate. • Use story telling to get them on your side. • Use whiteboard to drive decisions.
  • 27. Q & A • 70% of all questions can be anticipated. • Repeat the question so everyone can hear it. • If there aren’t questions at first, start with one of your own.
  • 28. Incorporate questions into presentations. Aim for dialogue, not a monologue.
  • 29. Appoint a Director of So What? for important meetings.
  • 30. Review commitments at the end. “So this is the new company logo, right?
  • 31. Logistics
  • 32. PRACTICE.
  • 33. PRACTICE.
  • 34. PRACTICE.
  • 35. Always scout the room to avoid surprises.
  • 36. Research says audiences remember information longer & relate better when you show people.
  • 37. EXIT STRATEGIES 1. If the meeting goes south, get out. 2. Don’t try to solve the problem on the fly. 3. Say “Thank you. Let us get back to you by (date).”
  • 38. Big Big Big
  • 39. Numbers are usually little data points of human behavior. In translating a numerical story to a boardroom presentation, look for a way to find the humanity. Visualization 101:
  • 40. Figure out what you want to say away from PowerPoint (don’t let the outliner control you).
  • 41. Break up the PowerPoint 3 bullet pointed slides in a row is too many.
  • 42. Break up the PowerPoint • Insert pictures, video and sound throughout
  • 43. Make a point. Tell a story that reinforces the point.
  • 44. Incorporate more visuals, less type. Visuals are exciting.
  • 45. Free imagery is available everywhere: • Search: free imagery, free vector art
  • 46. Free imagery is available everywhere: • Search: free imagery, free vector art • PowerPoint image collection
  • 47. Free imagery is available everywhere: • Search: free imagery, free vector art • PowerPoint image collection • Stock photos
  • 48. Free imagery is available everywhere: • Search: free imagery, free vector art • PowerPoint image collection • Stock photos • Company image file
  • 49. Free imagery is available everywhere: • Search: free imagery, free vector art • PowerPoint image collection • Stock photos • Company image file • Flickr Creative Commons
  • 50. Free imagery is available everywhere: • Search: free imagery, free vector art • PowerPoint image collection • Stock photos • Company image file • Flickr Creative Commons • Your camera
  • 51. Incorporate questions into presentations.
  • 52. Go to a black slide when you have a planned question, discussion or story.
  • 53. Review commitments at the end. “So this is the new company logo, right?
  • 54. Slides that look amateurish make you look like an amateur. Visualization 101: hang in there!
  • 55. Forty years of research says that if you use pictures of people, your audience will remember your information longer and relate to you better. Visualization 101:
  • 56. Forty years of research says that if you use pictures of people, your audience will remember your information longer and relate to you better. Visualization 101:
  • 57. Forty years of research says that if you use pictures of people, your audience will remember your information longer and relate to you better. Visualization 101:
  • 58. Visualization 101: • Bullets and numbers are signposts. • They give the eye a place to start. • They keep you on the page.
  • 59. Visualization 101: Avoid type orphans by using manual line breaks. (Keep key points together.)
  • 60. Visualization 101: Avoid type orphans by using manual line breaks. (Keep key points together.)
  • 61. Visualization 101: If you have a budget: Hire an art director.
  • 62. Visualization 101: If you don’t have a budget: Become a power user of PowerPoint or KeyNote. http://www.lynda.com
  • 63. Visualization 101: Pick a colored background. White spotlights the audience.
  • 64. Visualization 101: No more than 5-6 lines (not bullets!) per slide.
  • 65. Picture rights are visible with a right click so you can see usage rules. Visualization 101:
  • 66. Numbers are usually little data points of human behavior. In translating a numerical story to a boardroom presentation, look for a way to find the humanity. Visualization 101:
  • 67. Use background colors from the picture. Color-Cop is free. Visualization 101:
  • 68. Typography 101:
  • 69. Typography 101: • Using fonts consistently makes your slides look more professional.
  • 70. Typography 101: • Using fonts consistently makes your slides look more professional. • When using different fonts on a slide, do so with purpose, not to make things “look interesting.”
  • 71. Insert type into visuals to vary the look. (Watch for blank spaces in photos.)
  • 72. Amy Cuddy: Body Language Shapes Who You Are http://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_lang uage_shapes_who_you_are.html
  • 73. Get up & do the gorilla pose in the bathroom or somewhere private at te break in preparation for presenting.
  • 74. The power of storytelling.
  • 75. We are hardwired for story. Stories make us lean in. When you tell a story about yourself, you share something vulnerable and hidden to us. You allow us to get closer to you & we like you for it.
  • 76. Don’t Regret Regret By Kathryn Schulz TEDVideos.com http://www.ted.com/talks/lang/en/kathryn_schulz_don_t_reg
  • 77. Write down a story about yourself. Tell us something personal, the more humiliating, the better.
  • 78. Write down a story about yourself. “Hell is story friendly.” --Charles Baxter
  • 79. Reading on the page and hearing a story read out loud are completely different.
  • 80. This American Life: Wedding Bells and Door Bells Elizabeth Gilbert http://www.thisamericanlife.org/radio-archives/e
  • 81. Now write about what this story illustrates that’s universal.
  • 82. PERSONAL TUNE-UP
  • 83. Presentation buddies: Write notes on anything you observe as your partners presents.
  • 84. Write about what you know (or hate) about yourself as a presenter.
  • 85. Words really matter.
  • 86. Tan Le’s Immigration Story
  • 87. Tan Le’s Immigration Story Why does this kill us?
  • 88. A Case for Reading Your Slides http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68bNMaG9OII
  • 89. It’s a myth that you shouldn’t read your own slides. Steve Jobs did it.
  • 90. Follow Two Pens http://www.twopens.com @twopens2 Cynthia@twopens.com