Cchis may newsletter 2014
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Cchis may newsletter 2014

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The May issue of the CCHIS Newsletter discusses the use of the Root Operation Transplantation (Y).

The May issue of the CCHIS Newsletter discusses the use of the Root Operation Transplantation (Y).

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Cchis may newsletter 2014 Cchis may newsletter 2014 Document Transcript

  • An organ transplant replaces a diseased, absent or deteriorating organ with a healthy organ. The deteriorating organ is removed from the transplant recipient and the donor’s healthy tissue or organ is then transplanted. The exchange is made during what is considered a major operative encounter. Not all organs are transplantable. Some of the most common organ transplants are:  The Kidney for diseases such as Diabetes, Polycystic Kidney Disease or Lupus.  The Heart for Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiomyopathy or Heart Failure.  The Lung for Cystic Fibrosis or COPD.  Pancreas for Diabetes.  Liver for Cirrhosis  Bone Marrow Transplant for Leukemia, Aplastic Anemia or Multiple Myeloma  Cornea Transplant for Fuchs’ Dystrophy, Keratoconus or postoperative Cataract surgery.  Cord Blood Cell Transplant (a form of Stem Cell Transplant) for various cancers.  Bone Marrow Transplant for the restoration of stem cells destroyed by high dosages of and/or radiation therapy. Most Common Organ Transplants WHAT TO EXPECT 1 Most Common Organ Transplants 2 Transplantation (Y) 3 Still Confused? 4 Requests for Coding Topics “Not all organs are transplantable.” May 2014 Volume 1 Issue 5 By Cynthia Brown, MBA, RHIT, CCS www.cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com CCHIS, P.O. Box 3019, Decatur, GA 30031 404-992-8984 http://www.cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com Cynthia@cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com [phone] CODING YESTERDAY’S NOMENCLATURE TODAY® Root Operation Transplantation (Y) CODING NEWSLETTER FOR HEALTHCARE CODING PROFESSIONALS
  • Page 2 Coding Yesterday’s Nomenclature Today Transplantation is a part of a group of four root operations “that put in or put back or move some or all of a body part.” When an organ, such as the kidney or lung is being transplanted the third character in a seven character ICD-10 PCS code of the Medical and Surgical or Obstetrics Sections is “Y”; unless bone marrow, pancreatic islet cells, female ovum or stem cells are being transplanted. In which case, the coder should look in the Administration Section (3); Physiological Systems and Anatomical Regions Body System (E); and Introduction (0) Root Operation for correct code assignment. In the Obstetrics Section (1), the root operation is still (Y); but the body system is Pregnancy (0) and the body part is Products of Conception (0). The root operation Transplantation (Y) is defined as putting in or on all or a portion of a living body part taken from another individual or animal to physically take the place and/or function of all or a portion of a similar body part. When bone marrow, pancreatic islet cells, female ovum, or stem cells are transplanted, the root operation Introduction (0) is used and is defined as putting in or on a therapeutic, diagnostic, nutritional, physiological, or prophylactic substance except blood or blood products. The Body Systems in the Medical and Surgical Section (0) for Transplantation (Y) are: Heart & Great Vessels, Lymphatic & Hemic System, Respiratory System, Gastrointestinal System, Hepatobiliary System & Pancreas, Urinary System, and the Female Reproductive System. There is NEVER a device (5th character Z is used) in the transplantation of a body part from the Medical Surgical Section (0) or the Obstetrics Section (1). In the Administration Section (3) there is a substance character rather than a device character. The Substance is Pancreatic Islet Cells (U), Fertilized Ovum (Q), or Stem Cells, Somatic (E). The qualifiers in the Medical and Surgical Section are types of transplants, namely Allogeneic (0), Syngeneic (1), or Zooplastic (2). An Allogeneic transplant is the taking from a different individual who is of the same species. A Syngeneic transplant is the taking from an individual with the same genes, such as an identical twin. A Zooplastic transplant is the taking from an animal. In the Obstetrics Section (1) the qualifiers are body systems rather than types of transplants. The qualifiers for the Administration Section (3) are Autologous (0) or Nonautologous (1). Autologous refers to that which comes from the patient and Nonautologous refers to that which is taken from another human being. Note: Cornea transplants and heart valve transplants are found the Medical and Surgical Section (0) using the root operation Replacement (R) rather than the root operation Transplantation (Y). www.cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com “Harvesting Bone Marrow” “The Administration Section (3) is consulted for bone marrow transplants.” Transplantation—Root Operation (Y)
  • Coding Yesterday’s Nomenclature Today MEDICAL AND SURGICAL ADMINISTRATION OBSTETRICS Medical & Surgical (0) Qualifier Allogeneic (0) Qualifier Syngeneic (1) Qualifier Zooplastic (2) Root Operation Transplantation (Y) Device No Device (Z) Administration (3) Qualifier Autologous (0) Qualifier Nonautologous (1) Root Operation Introduction (0) Substance Pancreatic Islet Cells (U) Substance Fertilized Ovum (Q) Substance Stem Cells, Somatic (E) Obstetrics (1) Qualifier Body Systems Root Operation Transplantation (Y) Device No Device (Z) AHIMA approved ICD-10 CM/PCS Trainer STILL CONFUSED? ALL THINGS CODING® “Accurate and complete coding is a must in today’s economically challenged healthcare environment.”
  • Page 4 Coding Yesterday’s Nomenclature Today CCHIS Professional Affiliates AHIMA GHIMA AHIMA approved ICD-10 CM/PCS Trainer EDWOSB/WOSB VOSB SCORE Atlanta CyntCoding Health Information Services P.O. BOX 3019 Decatur, GA 30031 Phone: 404-992-8984 E-Fax: 678-805-4919 E-mail: cyntcoder@cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com Requests for Coding Topics E-mail your coding topics or request your FREE issue of the CCHIS Newsletter by visiting the website and leaving your contact information. You may also contact me at: cyntcoder@cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com CCHIS NEWSLETTER TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF USE All content provided in this “CCHIS Newsletter” is for informational purposes only. The owner of this newsletter makes no representations as to the accuracy or completeness of any information in this newsletter or found by following any link in this newsletter. The owner of http://cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.blogspot.com will not be liable for any errors or omissions in information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. The terms and conditions are subject to change at any time with or without notice. The owner of http://cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com will not be liable for any errors or omissions in information nor for the availability of this information. The owner will not be liable for any losses, injuries, or damages from the display or use of this information. The terms and conditions are subject to change at any time with or without notice. CODING YESTERDAY’S NOMENCLATURE TODAY® www.cyntcodinghealthinformationservices.com