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Educ 1841 materials adaptation
 

Educ 1841 materials adaptation

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  • Individual, teacher centered, focus on accuracy rather than fluency

Educ 1841 materials adaptation Educ 1841 materials adaptation Presentation Transcript

  • www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • EDUC 1841: Materials Adaptation American Culture & Language Institute, TESOL Certificate Program Northern Virginia Community College www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Overview • Types of Textbooks • Evaluate textbooks based on students’ needs and wants • Adapt existing textbooks to meet students’ needs and wants • Make activities more communicative www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Reflection • What types of textbooks appeal to you the most? The least? • How much time should a teacher spend adapting a textbook activity? • Should a teacher aim to finish a textbook during a semester? www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Types of Textbooks • Core or Basal Series – Multi-level – Integrated skills (reading, writing, speaking, & listening) – Correlated to state standards – CD Rom, Website, Teacher’s Guide, Student Book, & Workbook www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Types of Textbooks (cont.) • Integrated Skills Textbooks – Not part of a series • Grammar Textbooks – Core or Basal Series • Reference Grammar Textbooks – Teacher supplement www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Types of Textbooks (cont.) • Skill Specific Textbooks – Multi-level series – Reading & Writing or Speaking & Listening – Writing Composition or Pronunciation • Literacy Textbooks • Content-Based Texts – TOEFL Prep – Citizenship www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Benefits of Using a Textbook • Provides structure, consistency, logical progression of activities • Minimizes teacher preparation time • Learners can review and preview material • Meets students’ expectations of education • Provides guidance for new teachers • Includes multiple resources www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Drawbacks of Using a Textbook • Can be outdated, inauthentic, or use stereotypes • Marked up by previous students • Not communicative, i.e. teacher-centered & controlled • Don’t match course objectives or student level • Are too busy, i.e. page format is too cluttered www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Ideal Textbook • Activates & values students’ prior knowledge • Provides authentic material & practice in realworld tasks • Provides relevant material • Is learner centered and allows for discoverybased learning • Promotes learning strategies for independent learning outside of the classroom www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Materials Adaptation “ ESP teachers find themselves in a situation where they are expected to produce a course that exactly matches the needs of a group of learners, but are expected to do so with no, or very limited, preparation time.” Johns, 1990 www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Balance $ Time www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Adaptation Considerations • Prescribed textbook(s) • Supplied or purchased • Learner needs & wants • Learner level • Course Objectives • Institutional methodologies • Assessment • Paid planning time • Access to photocopying, etc. www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Original Textbook Exercise • Pairs read to each other to complete an information gap exercise. • Students look at partner’s palm and predict his or her future. A B 3 2 4 5 1 1. Life Line – indicates how energetic and strong you are, and timing of events 2. ____ Line – shows ______ to __________, ______ _______, and __________ (exercise continues) QUESTION 3 2 4 5 1 1. Life Line – indicates how _______ and ________ you are, and _______ of events 2. Brain Line – shows ability to concentrate, solve problems, and understand (exercise continues) How can you make this activity more communicative? www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Adapted Activity Part 1 • Students share one picture. A has names of lines, B has descriptions of lines. • A must ask B in order to identify and label the lines. Part 2 • A has the meanings for some lines, and B has the meanings for other lines. • They must ask each other questions about their futures www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Original Textbook Exercise QUESTION How can you adapt this activity to make it more student-centered and communicative? www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Adapted Activity • Ask students to tell about their experiences in calling the doctor. (prior knowledge) – What kinds of information did they need to give? – What was difficult about calling the doctor? • What things could they do to plan before calling the doctor? (strategies) – Describe the symptoms – Identify available days/times – Provide insurance and personal information www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Adapted Activity • Pairs: One student is the patient and one student is the receptionist. – – – – – Choose a illness below. Call the Westview Clinic. Describe your symptoms. Provide personal information Make an appointment. www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Original Textbook Exercise • Students listen to conversations of people asking for directions. • Starting from “You are here,” students draw lines and label the places. QUESTION How can you adapt this activity to make it more student-centered and communicative? www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Adapted Activity • Instead of listening to a tape, each student knows the location of one place • Students circulate in class and ask for directions • To check answers, have map on board • One student asks another for directions to a place • Instead of beginning at “You are here,” the next student starts at the last destination www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Original Board Game Benefits • Interactive • Language-based • Spontaneous • Over 70 good categories • Fun Drawbacks • Not good for large groups • Complicated rules • Only one game for class QUESTION How can you utilize the game’s strengths in creating an activity? www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Adapted Activity • Students work in teams. • Judge writes five letters (or a word) on board (don’t use Q, X, or Z). • Judge then shows category to students (on screen or writes on board). • Teams have to come up with five words in the category that begin with the five letters on the board (Teacher can decide time limits and point values). SOME CATEGORY EXAMPLES: related to the body, things moms say, found in a jungle, gets on your nerves, can smell it, mostly black, I own it, has some plastic on it www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Put it into Practice • In pairs, choose a textbook and identify – Type (core series, skills focus, etc.) – Level • Choose one chapter/unit and evaluate – Learner – Teacher (p. 230, Parrish) • Present your evaluation to the class www.nvcc.edu/workfo
  • Put it into Practice (cont.) • Choose one activity and adapt it to make it more communicative: – Activates & values students’ prior knowledge – Provides authentic material & practice in real-world tasks – Is learner centered and allows for discoverybased learning – Promotes learning strategies for independent learning outside of the classroom • Present your adapted activity to the class www.nvcc.edu/workfo