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Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
Ch14 forceandmotionsection2
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Ch14 forceandmotionsection2

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  • 1.  
  • 2. Motion and Force <ul><li>Chapter Twelve: Distance, Time, and Speed </li></ul><ul><li>Chapter Thirteen: Forces </li></ul><ul><li>Chapter Fourteen: Force and Motion </li></ul>
  • 3. Chapter Fourteen: Force and Motion <ul><li>14.1 Newton’s First and Third Laws </li></ul><ul><li>14.2 Newton’s Second Law </li></ul>
  • 4. Investigation 14B <ul><li>What is the relationship between force and motion? </li></ul>Newton’s Second Law
  • 5. 14.2 Newton’s Second Law <ul><li>Acceleration is the rate at which your velocity (speed with direction) changes. </li></ul>
  • 6. 14.2 Acceleration <ul><li>A car can change its velocity by speeding up, slowing down, or turning. </li></ul><ul><li>If an object’s acceleration is zero , the object could be moving at a constant speed in a straight line or could be stopped. </li></ul>
  • 7. <ul><li>To calculate acceleration, you divide the change in speed by the amount of time it takes for the change to happen. </li></ul>
  • 8. &nbsp;
  • 9. 14.2 Acceleration <ul><li>If an object speeds up, it has a positive acceleration. </li></ul><ul><li>If it slows down, it has a negative acceleration. </li></ul>What is the acceleration of the sailboat?
  • 10. 14.2 Force, mass and acceleration <ul><li>Force causes acceleration, and mass resists acceleration. </li></ul><ul><li>Newton’s second law relates the force on an object, the mass of the object, and its acceleration. </li></ul><ul><li>Force causes acceleration, and mass resists acceleration. </li></ul>
  • 11. &nbsp;
  • 12. <ul><li>The stronger the force on an object, the greater its acceleration. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Force is directly proportional to acceleration. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If twice the force is applied, the acceleration is twice as great. </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. <ul><li>The greater the mass, the smaller the acceleration for a given force. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mass is inversely related to force. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An object with twice the mass will have half the acceleration if the same force is applied. </li></ul></ul>
  • 14. 14.2 Applying the second law <ul><li>Keep the following important ideas in mind: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. The net force is what causes acceleration. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. If there is no acceleration, the net force must be zero. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. If there is acceleration, there must also be a net force. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4. The force unit of newtons is based on kilograms, meters, and seconds </li></ul></ul>
  • 15. 14.2 Newton’s second law and gravity <ul><li>Gravitational force exists between all objects that have mass. </li></ul><ul><li>An object is in free fall if it is accelerating due to the force of gravity and no other forces are acting on it. </li></ul><ul><li>Objects in free fall on Earth accelerate downward at 9.8 m/s2, the acceleration due to gravity . </li></ul>
  • 16. 14.2 Newton’s second law and gravity <ul><li>An object is in free fall if it is accelerating due to the force of gravity and no other forces are acting on it. </li></ul><ul><li>Objects in free fall on Earth accelerate downward at 9.8 m/s2, the acceleration due to gravity . </li></ul>
  • 17. &nbsp;
  • 18. 14.2 Universal gravitation <ul><li>Gravitational force exists between all objects that have mass. </li></ul><ul><li>You do not notice gravity between ordinary objects because it takes a huge amount of mass to create enough force to notice. </li></ul>
  • 19. 14.2 Universal gravitation <ul><li>The force of gravity between you and Earth is strong because the planet’s mass is huge. </li></ul><ul><li>Newton’s law of universal gravitation says the strength of the force depends on the mass of the objects and the distance between them. </li></ul>
  • 20. 14.2 Orbital motion <ul><li>Newton’s second law can be used to explain the motion of planets, moons, and satellites in orbit. </li></ul><ul><li>The orbiting moon falls around Earth. </li></ul>Can you kick a soccer ball into orbit? Can we launch a soccer ball into orbit?
  • 21. Activity <ul><li>Newton’s three laws can be used to explain the motion of everyday objects. </li></ul><ul><li>In this activity you will build a car and apply Newton’s laws to explain how it works and why it moves as it does. </li></ul>Making a Spool Car

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