Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Assessment 10.3 1 21 08
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Assessment 10.3 1 21 08

893

Published on

Published in: Business, Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
893
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Transcript

    • 1. Learning Life’s Lessons Through Literature 10.3 Contemporary Realistic Fiction and the Great Depression: Resilience Macomb I.S.D. High School ELA Units January 25, 2008 Barbara Reed Nelson, Independent Consultant Cynthia Schofield, High School English Teacher www.healthleader.uthouston.edu/gfx/2004art/re.
    • 2. Evolution of a Term: Resilience What the word meant to me when I was 16 -> -> What the word means to me now What the word means to me after reading excerpt: What the word will probably mean when I am ______ (pick an age) -> Ecosystem resilience is the capacity of an ecosystem to tolerate disturbance without collapsing into a qualitatively different state that is controlled by a different set of processes. Reviving the Essay, Gretchen Bernabei
    • 3. Theme Theme: Resilience is the ability to avoid, minimize, withstand, embrace, adapt, and recover from the effects of adversity.  
    • 4. Learning Life’s Lessons through Literature Macomb ISD High School ELA Units 10.3 Assessment Unit
      • ASSESSMENT
      • Selections: “I, Too, Sing America” and an article on “Resilience”
      • Responding to Reading: Multiple Choice and Response to Literature (end of unit)
      • Close and Critical Reading (end of unit)
      • ACT Grammar Assessment (end of unit)
      • Synthesis (end of unit)
      • Poetry Analysis (end of unit)
      • Persuasive Writing (during unit)
      • PORTFOLIO (during unit)
      • Research : Plagiarism
      • Drama: Readers’ Theater ( Grapes of Wrath )
      • Listening – Fritos and Coral
      • ACT Writing – 2 Prompts
      • Memoir Writing
      • Viewing Photographs
      CONTENTS
    • 5. Theme applied to texts: I, Too, Sing America by Langston Hughes I, too, sing America I am the darker brother. They send me to eat in the kitchen When company comes, But I laugh, And eat well, And grow strong.   Tomorrow, I'll be at the table When company comes. Nobody'll dare Say to me, "Eat in the kitchen," Then.   Besides, They'll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed--   I, too am America. 
      • Ecosystem resilience is the capacity of an ecosystem to tolerate disturbance without collapsing into a qualitatively different state that is controlled by a different set of processes. A resilient ecosystem can withstand shocks and rebuild itself when necessary. Resilience in social systems has the added capacity of humans to anticipate and plan for the future.
      • Three defining characteristics:
      • The amount of change the system can undergo and still retain the same controls on function and structure
      • The degree to which the system is capable of self-organization
      • The ability to build and increase the capacity for learning and adaptation
      Example of Resilience Example of Resilience
    • 6. Coral Dominance > > > > Algal Dominance
    • 7. Multiple Choice Assessments
      • DIRECTIONS: You will be reading two selections, responding to multiple-choice questions about each selection, responding to cross-text multiple-choice questions and a response to literature question. You are encouraged to read the texts deeply, take notes in the margins, and look back at the selections as often as you wish as you answer the questions. The selections and the questions are focused on the following theme statement: Resilience is the ability to avoid, minimize, withstand, embrace, adapt, and recover from the effects of adversity. Keep this theme statement in mind as you read and answer questions.
      • 4. The poet reveals his resilience in the
        • first stanza.*
        • second stanza.
        • third stanza.
        • fourth stanza.
      • 20. A primary theme of this article is
        • resilience has three characteristics.
        • resilience of systems depends largely on climate.
        • ecosystems are inherently resilient. *
        • sea urchins are resilient creatures.
      • 33. Langston Hughes would MOST likely be interested in which of the following areas of study from the “Resilience” article?
        • ecosystem resilience
        • social-ecological systems *
        • coral reef ecosystems
        • marine biodiversity
    • 8. Close and Critical Reading
      • (Says-Means-Suggests)
      • What does the text say ? (Briefly summarize the excerpt at a literal level.)
      • How does it say it? In other words, how does the author develop the text to convey his/her purpose? (What are the genre, format, organization, features, etc.?)
      • What does the text mean ? (What message/theme/concept is the author trying to get across?)
      • So what ? (What does the message/theme/concept mean in your life and/or in the lives of others? Why is it worth sharing/telling? What significance does it have to your life and/or to the lives of others?)
    • 9. MISD ELA 10.3 Assessment – Close and Critical Reading
      • What does the text say? (Briefly summarize the poem “I, Too, Sing America” at the literal level). The poet, Langston Hughes, states he, too, sings America. He states he is the “darker brother” sent to the kitchen to eat “when company comes.” However, he notes he just laughs, eats well, and grows strong. He further states that tomorrow when company comes he will eat at the table. The guests will see he is beautiful and be ashamed, for he, too, sings America.
      • How does it say it? In other words, how does the author’s choice of text convey his/her purpose? (What are the genre, format, organization, features, etc.?) The poet conveys his text through the genre of a poem. He uses stanzas and the white space between the stanzas to emphasize particular words. For example, the last word in the first stanza is “strong,” and the first word in stanza two is “Tomorrow.” The reader can infer that the author will be strong in the future, though he is currently separated from those at the table. The author creates vivid images to emphasize his point. The image of a “darker brother” being sent to the kitchen to eat emphasizes the separation that exists. The poem does not rhyme, yet the rhythm is emphasized through the repetition of Hughes’ words.
      • What does the text mean? (What message/theme/concept is the author trying to get across?) Though this is a short poem, one can obtain several messages the poet is trying to convey. For example, the author, by noting he is “the darker brother,” is emphasizing his African American heritage. Consequently, when he speaks about himself, he is speaking of his race. African Americans in the 1930s were refused a place at the table literally and metaphorically. He is relaying that in the future the African Americans will not only have a place at the table, but will also be recognized/celebrated for their beauty/talents. In addition, he makes several interesting word choices to emphasize his message. He refers to himself as “I.” So, given that he symbolizes the African Americans, the “I” represents the African Americans. He also uses the word “They.” The word “They” is always capitalized and refers to the whites who keep him from the table. He notes at the end of the poem that “they’ll… be ashamed” of their actions. Finally, the word “sing” is multi-layered. It brings many historical connotations with it. One sings in praise/worship. Yet, the African Americans also sang in earlier times to relay the coded messages of the Underground Railroad, a path to freedom. Finally, the word “sing” next to the word “America” reminds one of the National Anthem, the National Anthem of all Americans, not just some.
      • So what? (What does the message/theme/concept mean in your life and/or in the lives of others? Why is it worth sharing/telling? What significance does it have to your life and/or in the lives of others?)
      • This reminds me that our history is filled with stories of Americans that were denied equality (Native Americans, African Americans, Italian immigrants, Irish immigrants, etc.). Yet, through resilience they forced America to recognize their right to sit at the table and be treated as equals. I need to remember that my ancestors were immigrants. Yet, their voices made the song of America more beautiful.
    • 10.  
    • 11.
      • Close and Critical Reading—Student Sample
      • What does the text say? (Briefly summarize the poem “I, Too, Sing America” at the literal level).
      • The poem “ I Too Sing America” is about an African American who is separated by his race when company comes to eat dinner. The next day he has gained his sense of pride and chooses to eat at the dinner table despite anyone else’s opinions. When he does sit at the table there will people in embarrassed, but he believes they will see how beautiful he is. At the beginning of the poem Hughes says “I, too, sing America and at the end of the poem he says “I too am America.”
      • How does it say it? In other words, how does the author’s choice of text convey his/her purpose? (What are the genre, format, organization, features, etc.?)
      • Determined cares about situation
      • The author’s choice of text reflected about himself and his feelings. He is a brother of darker skin, who is very strong willed and minded. He is direct to point when saying “When company comes no one will dare.” That particular word choice is a direct and firm decision. When he says “They send me to eat in the kitchen” this is a prime example of discrimination. Hughes is being separated by others because of the color of his skin. The organization reflects the meaning of the text because at the beginning of “ I too sing American” he says “I too sing America” and at the end “I too am America.” There is no difference between him and the others who are seated at the kitchen table.
      • What does the text mean? (What message/theme/concept is the author trying to get across?)
      • The message Langston Hughes attempts to convey is, his sense of pride for himself and his country. He is going to stand up for what he believes in, despite the embarrassment others might have as he sits at the table, he is there to prove a point. And that point is, he too is an American regardless of his skin color, and is determined to show others he is no different. “Tomorrow I’ll be at the table” and “nobody will dare” send me to the kitchen. He is a strong willed person and believes he is going to sit at the table and eat like everyone else.
      • So what? (What does the message/theme/concept mean in your life and/or in the lives of others? Why is it worth sharing/telling? What significance does it have to your life and/or in the lives of others?)
      • In today’s society there are still racial tensions between African American’s and whites. Although it seems different than it was back in the 1930’s and 1940’s racial tensions is still an issue. It might not be any incidents at the dinner table, or separation by different restaurants and drinking fountains, but there are sightings of nooses hung in public places in today’s society. That is just one of the many examples of racial tensions happening in the 21st century.
    • 12. 10.3 Assessment: ACT Grammar ACT Format and Topics MISD ELA 10.3 Assessment – Grammar and Rhetoric Assessment DIRECTIONS: The following assessment consists of eight underlined words and phrases in context, or general questions about the passages. Most of the underlined passages contain errors or inappropriate expressions. You are asked to compare each with the four alternatives in the answer column. If you consider the original version best, choose the letter A : NO CHANGE. Read each passage through before answering the questions based on it. 1. A NO CHANGE B field five-thousand fans, C field 5,000 fans, D field five thousand fans * 2. A NO CHANGE * B amid the sidelines. C among the sidelines. D in the sidelines Passage 1 THE THRILL OF POSSIBILITY The hand-rolled cigarette dangled from his lips, and a string of smoke drifted up around his brown eyes as he nervously paced through the locker room at West Point. Dressed in a bowler hat and dark gray suit, Glenn “Pop” Warner was buried deep in his own thoughts. Out on Army’s football (1) field five-thousand fans filled the wooden bleachers and hundreds of others sat in folding chairs (2) along the sidelines. Warner could hear the crowd murmur with expectation as he took another drag from his usual pre-game cigarette, releasing more smoke from the orange glow of the burning tip. Time was running out before kickoff, and he was still searching for just the right words to spark a fire in the hearts of his Carlisle Indian School football players.
    • 13. MISD ELA 10.3 Assessment Writing—Analysis Paper Resilience is evident in every era of American history. Read the following poems provided and the biographical sketches of the poets who wrote them. Note that the simple biographies reveal insight into the poets’ experiences and may provide the reader insight into their texts as well. You are encouraged to read the poems deeply, taking notes in the margins. Keep in mind the following theme statement: Resilience is the ability to avoid, minimize, withstand, embrace, adapt, and recover from the effects of adversity. Then select one of the poems and respond to the following question. DIRECTIONS: Write a well-organized essay in which you briefly summarize the poem’s content and discuss how the poet uses diction or imagery to emphasize the resilience of an era. Refer to the rubric provided. (Scored with an AP format poetry analysis rubric.)
    • 14. Synthesis
      • Consider the three defining characteristics of resilience as applied to ecosystems, or to integrated systems of people and the natural environment:
        • The amount of change the system can undergo and still retain the same controls
        • on function and structure
        • The degree to which the system is capable of self-organization
        • The ability to build and increase the capacity for learning and adaptation
      • Review the articles, stories and poetry you have read around the theme : “Resilience is the ability to avoid, minimize, withstand, embrace, adapt, and recover from the affects of adversity. ” Read the new article about Thomas Kuhn author of The Structure of Scientific Revolutions . Use the understandings you have gained from the assessment unit and from the Kuhn article to explain how the above characteristics fit two or more examples of resilience or create a new set of characteristics that apply to what you have read in this unit. Explain how these new characteristics apply to each example.
      • You have the choice of responding in a number of ways:
        • Write a persuasive, descriptive, or comparative essay.
        • Develop a manual for resilience.
        • Produce a video.
        • Create a photo essay.
        • Choose another genre.
    • 15. Synthesis Rubric
    • 16. Persuasive Writing
      • Students in tenth grade English language arts are encouraged to respond critically and take a stand on controversial issues. With the wide use of the internet, plagiarism is an issue that demands a critical response and stance. The theme for assessment unit 10.3 is Resilience is the ability to avoid, minimize, withstand, embrace, adapt, and recover from the effects of adversity. As you read the articles and excerpts that follow, note the resilience of the individuals on each side of the issue presented.
      • DIRECTIONS: Read the following scenario and articles/excerpts from a variety of sources and respond to the prompt that follows.
      • Imagine you have poured your heart and soul into a memoir for a class assessment. You intend to submit it for publication after you receive your teacher’s response. Just prior to handing it in to your teacher, your parents receive the following letter.
      • (The letter informs students and parents that because of plagiarism, they are being required to turn all major assignments in to a service called Turnitin.com for checking. Turnitin.com will catalog and use their papers to check future papers.)
    • 17. PORTFOLIO assessments completed during the unit:
      • Research : PowerPoint Quiz on Plagiarism
      • Drama: Readers’ Theater ( Grapes of Wrath )
      • Listening – Fritos and Coral
      • ACT Writing – 2 Prompts
      • Memoir Writing
      • Viewing Photographs
    • 18. MISD ELA 10.3 Assessment Persuasive Writing-Portfolio ACT Writing Prompt I Educators debate over the success of teaching life skills/character education in the school setting. Some educators support character education in the school setting because they think students need to be taught these traits (i.e., resilience, integrity, reliability, etc.) in an academic setting. Other educators do not support using class time on character education because they believe these traits are best taught at home. Write an essay, taking a position on this issue. You may write about either one of the two points of view given, or you may present a different point of view on this question. Use specific reasons and examples to support your position.
    • 19. ACT Rubric
      • Score = 4
      • Essays within this score range demonstrate adequate skill in responding to the task.
      • The essay shows an understanding of the task. The essay takes a position on the issue and may offer some context for discussion. The essay may show some recognition of complexity by providing some response to counter-arguments to the writer’s position. Development of ideas is adequate, with some movement between general statements and specific reasons, examples, and details. Focus on the specific issue in the prompt is maintained throughout most of the essay. The organization of the essay is apparent but predictable. Some evidence of logical sequencing of ideas is apparent, although most transitions are simple and obvious. The introduction and conclusion are clear and somewhat developed. Language is adequate, with some sentence variety and appropriate word choice. There may be some distracting errors, but they do not impede understanding.
    • 20.
      • ACT Prompt—Student Work
      • The definition of character: the aggregate of features and traits that form the individual nature of some person or thing. Someone’s character is the absolute basis of who they are. Character is molded and can be changed. However this cannot be done in school, by teachers who have very little personal connection to the students. Teachers are responsible for educating the child while it is the parent’s job to teach the child how to be a “good person”.
      • The high school curriculum is filled with information that is supposed to prepare students for college. Students are being forced to take more and more core classes. The core classes are basically the only classes that colleges consider when looking at grade point average. This is why it would be ridicules to ask educators to take time away from their responsibilities of teaching core classes to take on the role of a parent. Most likely a student already has a fairly concrete character by the time they have reached high school. It would take a major event to change the character of a high school student. An example of such an event would be getting into serious trouble, or something done by family. A mini lesson in high school is going to have a dismal affect on students. This is especially true for the majority of high school students who do not even want to be in class. From the personal experience of a student who understands that high school is a gateway to college; I know that character lessons are wasted on teenagers who quite frankly do not care. By attempting to force good character onto students, educators suggest that the students have poor character. A proper resolution for this may not be teaching the students but teaching the parents. It is my belief that it is the family that molds character and by high school it is likely too late to change this character with a mini lesson. I agree that essential traits such as resilience, integrity, personal best need to be taught but to whom? The parents; if the parents play the major role in forming a child’s characters, then they need to be educated of good character traits. If the parents know good traits then they can help pass those onto the kids. This way the educators will not have to take time away from preparing a teenager for college.
      • I understand the position that character is a lesson that needs to be learned before one enters the real world. High school is likely the last place a teenager can receive this lesson before going out into the real world. This however, is not high school educators concern. Character aside if the student is successful in high school and graduates then in educators eyes they are ready for the next step whether it be college or the workforce. Both college and the work force can provide the opportunity for a major event that could change poor character. Educators are not wrong for sending students off without attempting to teach character. It is simply not their responsibility nor should it be their concern.
      • (This could be a five I think it is fairly well written.)
    • 21. Listening – Fritos—Student Work
      • Extended Response to “The Birth of the Frito”
      • Think of the resilience shown by Doolin and the resilience of someone you have studied or learned about in the unit on the Great Depression. In a paragraph, compare and contrast the resilience shown by these two people. To get the total number of three possible points, be sure to fully develop the similarities and differences between the two individuals.
      • There was a boxer whose prime had passed when the Great Depression hit. He had a family but hardly enough money for food. He lost electricity and almost lost his house. He went to the docks everyday to try to find work. He even begged a group of boxing managers for money and a chance to box again. When that chance came, despite being physically diminished, Jim showed great resilience and determination and won many fights. After he had tasted how bad the Depression was, he fought as hard as he could to avoid ever being there again. Charles Doolin could have just given up on his dream of Fritos. His chance came during the Great Depression when finding the money to support his idea and finding willing buyers was scarce. His resilience was shown through his extremely determined work ethic. The two men are very similar in the fact they were both very resilient during the Great Depression. Neither wanted to give up their dreams and fall into its clasps. They are different because Doolen was pursuing a dream. Jim had to make money to save his family from the streets. Also, he was actually fighting. His boxing was his resilience compared to Doolen’s coming out through his determination.
    • 22. Viewing Photographs
      • DIRECTIONS: View the next two photographs critically and read the historical
      • information provided. Then answer the following questions:
      • What does the photograph convey? How does it say it? What does the photograph mean? So what?
      • Not all farm families who became migrants during the Great Depression did so because of drought, and not all went to California. Many families lost their land when agricultural prices dropped, and the mechanization of agriculture left many agricultural laborers without work. These members of a South Texas family were photographed by the Farm Security Administration’s Dorothea Lange in August 1936.
    • 23. MISD ELA 10.3 Assessment – Close and Critical Reading ( Suggested Answers)
      • What does the photograph convey?? (Briefly summarize the photograph at the literal level). The photograph shows a picture of a woman standing at the back of a truck. Inside the truck are three girls, who look directly at the camera. There is also a mattress in the truck and a make-shift cover.
      • How does it say it? In other words, how does the photographer choose to convey his/her purpose? (What are the features, etc.?) The photographer uses a long shot to capture the scene. A long shot shows the full body or the scene around an object. The truck converted into a camper is directly in the center of the picture. Thus, the viewer’s eyes are drawn to the truck and the woman who stands in front of it. The photograph is also taken at eye-level. Consequently, it seems natural as the viewer is even with the subjects of the photograph. The truck appears to be pulled off the road, as only one road rut is showing. This conveys that the subjects have pulled off to rest or eat or take care of some other necessary human need. Yet, they may have pulled off for repairs, as a pair of boots sticking out of the bottom of the truck implies a mechanical problem. The photographer has also captured resilience in their lifestyle. A mattress reveals this is their home, the home of migrants. The road is a metaphor for their lives.
      • What does the photograph mean? (What message/theme/concept is the author trying to get across?) The photograph means that for millions of Americans during the Great Depression poverty was a way of life. Yet, due to their resilience they kept going down the road. In other words, the human spirit transcends the agony of hardship.
      • So what? (What does the message/theme/concept mean in your life and/or in the lives of others? Why is it worth sharing/telling? What significance does it have to your life and/or in the lives of others?) Answers may be personal and will vary but might include some of the following:
      • I am reminded of the beauty of the human spirit. However, perhaps the most remarkable thing is that we are stronger together than we are apart. When I work at the soup kitchen, I am struck by children leading children to the counter for food. The children are stronger because they have someone depending on them. I am stronger because I have someone who depends on me.
    • 24. Thank you!
      • We wish you well in using the assessments.
      • We’ve enjoyed working together to develop them, and we hope you find them useful.
      Dr. Elaine Weber Carrie Wozniak Barbara Reed Nelson Dr. Cynthia Schofield Jane Faulds Gerri Newnum

    ×