Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Plagiarism+tx+2011+upload

107

Published on

Published in: Education, Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
107
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Write from Wrong: Strategies for Addressing Student Plagiarism Barry Gilmore (www.barrygilmore.com)
  • 2. Prompt: Write an essay about names and identity in The House on Mango Street. Most of the women Esperanza knows on Mango Street are either trapped in their marriages or tied down by their children. For example, Esperanza’s grandmother. Esperanza did not want to “inherit her place by the window.” She neither likes what she has already inherited from her grandmother—her name. Esperanza plays with words when she first expresses her dissatisfaction with her name. She says that in Spanish, her name means “too many letters. It means sadness [from the opposite of esperar, which is desesperarse], it means waiting [from the verb esperar].”
  • 3. Names are a very important part of one’s personality. The name Sarah, for instance, comes from the Bible. This shows that names have a long tradition for many people. Tradition helps to determine the adult one becomes.
  • 4. Dear Joel, Did you know that my name comes from the Bible? Actually, I’m not sure who Sarah was, but my mom told me she learned about my name in Sunday School when she was a kid. Sarah
  • 5. Dear Sarah, That’s cool. Joel is a religious name, too. It means God. So I’m like God, only I don’t really think that so don’t think I’m full of myself please. You should find out more about your name. Let me know if you do. Your friend (but not God), Joel
  • 6. Hey Joel, I don’t think your God either. Sarah P.S. Hey I’m just kidding and I think Joel is a cool name.
  • 7. Sarah. HA HA HA. I just asked Ms. R about you’re name and she says Sarah was Abraham’s wife and she had a baby when she was 90!!! I don’t know who Abraham was, though, but he’s in the bible too. You should write about that. Joel
  • 8. That’s a good idea but I don’t want to have a baby when I’m 90 because I couldn’t pick it up or something. Babys are gross anyway. Do you want babies someday? Sarah
  • 9. Dear Sarah, No way. Joel
  • 10. Leading questions Who gave you your name? Why? Compare one sound in your name to another sound. Describe that sound. Will you still like your name in 20 years? Why do you like or dislike your name? What mistakes do people make when they say your name? What do they think about you when they hear your name?
  • 11. From an exchange student… The correct way to pronounce my name is “a’-kee-eh”. Each sylable pronounced distinctly and sharply without blending into the next sylable. Unfortunately, when people try to pronounce it “in the right way,” they actually mispronounce it by creating a whole different word, sound, and meaning: a’-kiya. Which means an “empty house” in the Japanese language. In my opinion, being “a key” is better than being an “empty house,” because akie is from the word aki. Which in Japanese language means autumn the best season of the year! Even though the pronunciation of autumn aki is different from the English word “a key” I am willing to be “a key”. I could lock door of an empty house. -Akie Maekawa
  • 12. Several drafts later…. My name is Sarah. It’s a name from the Bible, but that’s not why I like it. I love my name because it rolls on your tongue, because my mother gave it to me as a gift, and because it ends with the sound you make when you see a beautiful mountain or sunrise. I like to think of my mother holding me after I was born, looking down at me wrapped up like a present and saying my name: Sarah. I don’t know what the grown-up Sarah looks like yet, just like I don’t know what grown-up Sarah does for a job, where she lives, or whether she has a family of her own. When she looks back, I don’t know what she’ll remember about me. But we’ll have one thing in common: a name.
  • 13. Sample student introduction (Spencer) A symbol is an object, action, or event that represents something or that creates a range of associations beyond itself. In the book A Thousand Splendid Suns, one symbol is the clothing that women have to wear. This clothing reveals many things about the characters and the themes of the work as a whole.
  • 14. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation
  • 15. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism
  • 16. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism Student/parent contract
  • 17. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism Student/parent contract Administration / school board response
  • 18. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) The project: research, writing, presentation Classroom results: 25% plagiarism Student/parent contract Administration / school board response Long-term consequences
  • 19. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) A. Teacher/Administration: Students receive a zero B. Parents/Students: Students should be given another chance (rewrite) C. School Board: Students receive a zero, but reduce the value of the assignment
  • 20. What Are We Talking About? Plagiarism
  • 21. What Are We Talking About? Student Choices Plagiarism
  • 22. What Are We Talking About? Student Choices Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response
  • 23. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Pressure: Time Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response
  • 24. What’s the Main Reason Your Students Plagiarize? A. It’s easy to do / they get lazy B. They’re confused / it’s a mistake C. They feel pressure about grades D. They get behind on deadlines E. Everyone does it, so they do it too
  • 25. My School: Why Students Plagiarize Ease/Laziness Pressure: grades Culture/everyone does it Pressure: deadlines Confusion: process 1% 1% 34% 40% 24%
  • 26. My School: How Students Plagiarize 83% 42% 25% 19% 15% 5% Term Paper Cutting and Mills Pasting Peer Copying Rearranging Making Up Never Words Sources Plagiarized
  • 27. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Pressure: Time Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response
  • 28. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Pressure: Time Teacher Choices Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Turnitin.com Failing, rewriting? Punitive response
  • 29. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) Merit and Purpose of Assignment Failure vs. Zero Plagiarism Instruction vs. Assumptions
  • 30. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Grades Pressure: Time Teacher Choices Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Assignments Turnitin.com Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Expectations Punitive response
  • 31. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Ease Pressure: Time Teacher Choices Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Assignments Turnitin.com Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Expectations Punitive response
  • 32. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Ease Culture Pressure: Time Teacher Choices Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Assignments Turnitin.com Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Expectations Punitive response
  • 33. Case Study: Take It Or Leave It (The Christine Pelton Leaf Project) Merit and Purpose of Assignment Failure vs. Zero Plagiarism Instruction vs. Assumptions Alignment of Policy: School and Class Consistency from Classroom to Classroom
  • 34. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Ease Culture Pressure: Time Teacher Choices Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Systems Assignments Turnitin.com Honor Codes Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Ethics Gap Expectations Punitive response
  • 35. School Culture: Honor Codes WHEN PRIVATE CAMPUSES WITH HONOR CODE LARGE PUBLIC UNIVERSITY WITH MODIFIED HONOR CODE CAMPUSES WITH NO HONOR CODE On tests 23% 33% 45% On written work 45% 50% 56%
  • 36. School Culture: Ethics Gap TEACHERS DID NOT DISCUSS PLAGIARISM TEACHERS DISCUSSED PLAGIARISM Grades 3-5 (understood) 49% 61% Grades 6-12 (felt it was acceptable) 37% 22%
  • 37. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning
  • 38. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning Honor Code Honor Code as a part of school culture
  • 39. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning Honor Code Honor Code as a part of school culture Turnitin.com Turnitin.com as a teaching tool
  • 40. Does Turnitin.com work? No 0-24% matches 25-49% 50-74% 75-100% Reports 8,988 15,953 3,033 558 1,346 Percent 30% 53% 10% 2% 5% Sample results from Penn State, 2005
  • 41. Does Turnitin.com work? 6. Did you alert students of plagiarism problems found by Turnitin.com and allow them to make corrections? Alerted no corrections Alerted allowed corrections No alert no corrections 21 44.7% 19 40.4% 7 14.9%
  • 42. Reduces Plagiarism Increases Learning Honor Code Honor Code as a part of school culture Turnitin.com Turnitin.com as a teaching tool Strict Consequences Standardized Expectations and Response
  • 43. What’s the Usual Response to Plagiarism in Your School? A. Ignore it B. Deal with it in classroom C. Report it to the administration D. Add to shared files for a two-strike system
  • 44. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Research by Eric M. Anderman
  • 45. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Research by Eric M. Anderman
  • 46. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Believe they’ll receive rewards for grades Research by Eric M. Anderman
  • 47. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Believe they’ll receive rewards for grades Attribute failure to outside circumstances Research by Eric M. Anderman
  • 48. School Culture: What’s Going On? Students who cheat tend to: Worry about school Perceive school as focused on grades Believe they’ll receive rewards for grades Attribute failure to outside circumstances Avoid deep-level cognitive strategies in problem solving Research by Eric M. Anderman
  • 49. School Culture: What’s Going On? “Long ago, I realized that I care more about receiving good grades than actually learning. Even though I realize this is wrong, I cannot seem to change my attitude…the competitiveness, the honoring of principal’s list students, the prestige— it all just encourages students to get good grades by any means necessary.”
  • 50. School Culture: Who’s At Risk? Athletes Boys Low achievers and high achievers Those who perceive it as common (in one study, 25% admitted to regular plagiarism, but 90% said their peers plagiarized regularly) Those who perceive teachers as plagiarists
  • 51. What Are We Talking About? Pressure: Time Pressure: Grades Intent Ease Culture Pressure: Time Teacher Choices Student Choices Intent Ease Plagiarism Systems Assignments Turnitin.com Honor Codes Assumptions Failing, rewriting? Ethics Gap Expectations Punitive response
  • 52. Sample student introduction (Spencer) A symbol is an object, action, or event that represents something or that creates a range of associations beyond itself. In the book A Thousand Splendid Suns, one symbol is the clothing that women have to wear. This clothing reveals many things about the characters and the themes of the work as a whole.
  • 53. Creativity? Ingenuity?
  • 54. Rethinking Assignments Write a 3-5 page formal essay on “Harrison Bergeron.”
  • 55. Rethinking Assignments Write a 3-5 page formal essay on “Harrison Bergeron.” "It took me about ten seconds to find a free essay online, but it wasn't very good. I could have paid $6.95 for a better one, though-probably worth it."
  • 56. Rethinking Assignments Write a 3-5 page formal essay on “Harrison Bergeron.” Make prompts more specific Make prompts more personal Use unlikely comparisons
  • 57. Rethinking Assignments Make prompts more specific
  • 58. Rethinking Assignments Make prompts more specific Choose three characters from the story "Harrison Bergeron" and find two quotations from each character. Using those six quotations, write an essay in which you compare the motivations and choices of the three characters.
  • 59. Rethinking Assignments Make prompts more specific Choose three characters from the story "Harrison Bergeron" and find two quotations from each character. Using those six quotations, write an essay in which you compare the motivations and choices of the three characters. "What a pain, I have to cut and paste those quotations into an essay that I found online on the general topic. This would take me about ten minutes, I guess, and I might have to pay for the original essay if I wanted it to be any good."
  • 60. Rethinking Assignments Make prompts more personal
  • 61. Rethinking Assignments Make prompts more personal Imagine you could spend one day in the world of “Harrison Bergeron” and talk to the characters in the story. Write a letter to the U.S. Handicapper General describing your experiences and your views on the society within the story after your visit.
  • 62. Rethinking Assignments Make prompts more personal Imagine you could spend one day in the world of “Harrison Bergeron” and talk to the characters in the story. Write a letter to the U.S. Handicapper General describing your experiences and your views on the society within the story after your visit. "The personal voice makes this one harder, but not too hard. I could probably do it mainly by changing pronouns with the find and replace function in Word and with a bit of formatting. Most teachers wouldn't catch on."
  • 63. Rethinking Assignments Use unlikely comparisons
  • 64. Rethinking Assignments Use unlikely comparisons Write an essay comparing “Harrison Bergeron” to the story “The Lottery.”
  • 65. Rethinking Assignments Use unlikely comparisons Write an essay comparing “Harrison Bergeron” to the story “The Lottery.” "Done. Took me about a minute. Do you want that double-spaced?"
  • 66. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron”
  • 67. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron” In groups or as a class, brainstorm topics and connections
  • 68. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron” In groups or as a class, brainstorm topics and connections Choose an individual topic
  • 69. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron” In groups or as a class, brainstorm topics and connections Choose an individual topic Find textual evidence, write a thesis
  • 70. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron” In groups or as a class, brainstorm topics and connections Choose an individual topic Find textual evidence, write a thesis Share thesis statements and discuss
  • 71. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron” In groups or as a class, brainstorm topics and connections Choose an individual topic Find textual evidence, write a thesis Share thesis statements and discuss Draft a first paragraph, outline
  • 72. Rethinking Assignments Read the story “Harrison Bergeron” In groups or as a class, brainstorm topics and connections Choose an individual topic Find textual evidence, write a thesis Share thesis statements and discuss Draft a first paragraph, outline Write an essay
  • 73. In eighth grade, I was an A student, but I hated my English teacher; the homework seemed dull and pointless. The assignment was to write summarie Andrew’s Story In eighth grade, I was an A student, but I hated my English teacher; the homework seemed dull and pointless. The assignment was to write summaries of each chapter; no analysis, just summary for the sole express point of making sure we read the book. I decided I could outsmart the system. I went to a lesser-known website and turned in the chapter summaries completely plagiarized. About halfway through To Kill a Mockingbird, the teacher caught me and another student who had decided the cheat in the same way.
  • 74. I was totally embarrassed, and still deeply regret my decision to plagiarize. However, I view that day as a turning point in my academic career; I started to work harder and have never really plagiarized again (apart from minor offenses from copying textbook material). I feel my decision to cheat was not because I lacked moral judgment or because I was not aware of what I was doing. I viewed the assignment as busywork and above all else, the teacher failed to reward individual students who put effort into the assignment, which eliminated the incentive to work harder to get a better grade. . . . I think that if the school had decided to punish me more, the real reason not to cheat would have been lost to me. It would turn an offense that is illegal because it is stealing into an offense that is wrong only if you are caught by your school.
  • 75. Puck: If we shadows have offended, Think but this and all is mended, That you have but slumber'd here While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend: If you pardon, we will mend. And, as I am an honest Puck, If we have unearned luck Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue, We will make amends ere long; Else the Puck a liar call: So, good night unto you all. Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends. (A Midsummer Night’s Dream V.i.)
  • 76. Puck: If we shadows have offended, Think but this and all is mended, That you have but slumber'd here While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend: If you pardon, we will mend. And, as I am an honest Puck, If we have unearned luck Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue, We will make amends ere long; Else the Puck a liar call: So, good night unto you all. Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends. (A Midsummer Night’s Dream V.i.)
  • 77. Puck: If we shadows have offended, Think but this and all is mended, That you have but slumber'd here While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend: If you pardon, we will mend. And, as I am an honest Puck, If we have unearned luck Now to 'scape the serpent's tongue, We will make amends ere long; Else the Puck a liar call: So, good night unto you all. Give me your hands, if we be friends, And Robin shall restore amends. (A Midsummer Night’s Dream V.i.)
  • 78. Sample student-generated questions (prompts) • Does the play suggest it is okay to lie? • Why is it called a “dream?” • Why do both Theseus and Puck use the word “shadow”? • Why are some people “pardoned” in the play? • Why do only Puck and Bottom break the fourth wall? • Is Puck ultimately benevolent or malicious?
  • 79. A process for developing prompts (without the need to plagiarize) • Create topics • Go back to the text—find examples • Discuss in pairs or groups • Write a thesis • Share and discuss (PINE) • Write an essay
  • 80. Sample student introduction 2 (Spencer) When Puck asks us to “pardon” him at the end of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, he points out the deep irony of the play: there is no justice in Shakespeare’s comedy, poetic, legal, or otherwise. We have no more power over Puck than the humans have over the fairies, their own fates, or love itself. Shakespeare’s world seems to include justice, but it can be seen that events in MSND are decided by power, not right and wrong.
  • 81. Rethinking Research Assignments 65% of students wrote a research paper for English class 38% of students wrote a research paper for social studies classes Of English research papers, 67% were on a historical/biographical topic 75% used all internet sources
  • 82. Rethinking Research Assignments Participant Responses
  • 83. Rethinking Research Assignments Are students invested? Offer choices, make topics relevant
  • 84. Rethinking Research Assignments Are students invested? Offer choices, make topics relevant The discipline problem: what should research look like for each discipline? Connect content to course content and skills
  • 85. Rethinking Research Assignments Are students invested? Offer choices, make topics relevant The discipline problem: what should research look like for each discipline? Connect content to course content and skills Digital literacy: are students using the internet wisely? Discuss research strategies
  • 86. Citation? Note taking? Collaboration?
  • 87. Rethinking Research Assignments S.E.A.R.C.H. (searching for reputable sites) C.A.R.S. (evaluating web material) C.A.P.I.T.A.L. I.D.E.A. (citation information)
  • 88. Rethinking Research Assignments Are students invested? Offer choices, make topics relevant The discipline problem: what should research look like for each discipline? Connect content to course content and skills Digital literacy: are students using the internet wisely? Discuss research strategies What’s the point of the research paper? Discuss, specify audience and purpose
  • 89. Resources www.barrygilmore.com Free teacher study guide: www.heinemann.com/gilmore

×