14) chapter 14 overheads -presenting the product
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14) chapter 14 overheads -presenting the product

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14) chapter 14 overheads -presenting the product 14) chapter 14 overheads -presenting the product Presentation Transcript

  • PRESENTING THE PRODUCT CHAPTER 14
  • PRODUCT PRESENTATION
    • During this phase, you show the product and tell about it.
    • As you determine the customer’s buying motives, you should display products that match the needs you have discovered.
    • The goal is to match customer need to the product’s features and benefits.
  • SHOW AND TELL
    • The following determinations must be made as you decide to show the products:
      • Which products to show
      • What price range to offer
      • How many products to show
      • What to say
          • Make sure you use layman’s term when in a retail situation.
          • Avoid jargon unless in a business to business situation
          • Avoid slang
  • MAKING THE PRESENTATION COME ALIVE
    • Displaying and Handling the Product
        • Some products need better presentation than others
        • Handle products carefully unless intended otherwise
    • Demonstrating
        • This helps the customer build confidence and understanding of the product.
    • Using Sales Aides
        • These include samples, reprints of articles, audiovisual aides, models, photos, drawings, graphs, charts, spec sheets, testimonials, and warranty info.
    • Involve the Customer
        • Try to get the customer physically involved with the presentation.
        • This keeps the customer’s attention and interest.
  • OBJECTIONS AND REJECTIONS
    • UNDERSTANDING OBJECTIONS
        • Objections are concerns, hesitations, doubts, or other honest reasons a customer has for not making a purchase.
        • Excuses are insincere reasons for not buying or not seeing the salesperson. Not in the mood to buy.
        • Objections should not be viewed negatively, but as a challenge to present more info about the product.
        • Objections can guide your sales presentation productively .
  • COMMON OBJECTIONS
    • Objections are usually based on the following items:
      • NEED—this occurs when a customer may want an item, but may not actually need it.
      • PRODUCT—these are concerns based on construction, ease of use, quality, color, size, or style.
      • SOURCE—based on negative past experience with the firm or brand.
      • PRICE—common with high end, expensive merchandise.
      • TIME—reveal a hesitation to buy immediately. Generally not really interested in buying.
  • FOUR STEP PROCESS FOR HANDLING OBJECTIONS
    • Listen Carefully— let the customer talk
    • Acknowledge the Customer’s Objections— this shows that you understand, even if you disagree. Never say, “You’re wrong.”
    • Restate the Objections— try to paraphrase what the customer has said. This shows you understand and can clarify the situation.
    • Answer the Objections— answer each objection tactfully and knowledgeably.
  • SPECIALIZED METHODS OF HANDLING OBJECTIONS
    • BOOMERANG—brings the objection back to the customer as a selling point.
    • QUESTION—keep questioning the customer to overcome the objection
    • SUPERIOR POINT—offset the objection with a valid reason and offset with other features/benefits.
    • DENIAL—this is based on customer misinformation.
    • DEMONSTRATION—overcome by showing how to use the product.
    • THIRD PARTY—use a previous customer or neutral person to provide a testimonial. Letters or stories exemplify other’s experiences.
    **See pg. 250 for examples of each.**