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Fundamentals of
nd
Game Design, 2 Edition
by Ernest Adams

Chapter 3: Game Concepts
Objectives





Take a game idea and add the necessary
material to make it into a design concept
Define the player’s ro...
Objectives (Cont.)





Know how to choose a target audience and
understand the special considerations
associated with ...
Getting an Idea


You can find game ideas anywhere






Dreams of doing something or achieving a goal
From media suc...
From Idea to Game Concept




A game concept is a description with enough
detail to discuss it as a commercial product
A...
The Player’s Role


Define the role





What is the player going to do?
Most important part of the game concept

Make...
Choosing a Genre




A genre is a category of games characterized
by a particular set of challenges, regardless
of setti...
Classic Game Genres







Action games—physical challenges
Strategy games—strategic, tactical, and
logistical challen...
Classic Game Genres (Cont.)






Construction and management games—
economic and conceptual challenges
Adventure games...
Hybrid Games





Games that cross genres
Risky because it might alienate some of your
target audience
The most success...
Defining Your Target Audience



Who will buy the game?
The representative player is a member of
your target audience

©...
The Dangers of Binary Thinking





Binary thinking—assumes that if group A
likes a thing, everyone outside that group
...
The Dangers of Binary Thinking
(Cont.)




Core versus casual—the most significant
method of grouping players
Other grou...
Progression Considerations




Players need to feel they are making
progress when playing long games
Progress can be imp...
Types of Game Machines


Home game consoles





Simpler, bolder graphics than a PC provides
Standard controller
Exce...
Types of Game Machines (Cont.)


Personal computer








Keyboard, mouse, joystick
Very high-resolution graphics
...
Types of Game Machines (Cont.)


Handheld game machines





Very popular and inexpensive
Fewer control mechanisms
Sm...
Types of Game Machines (Cont.)


Mobile phones and wireless devices





Little memory or processing power
No standar...
Types of Game Machines (Cont.)


Other devices




Personal digital assistants
Video gambling machines
Arcade machines...
Summary


You should now understand







Defining a game concept
Creating a high concept document
Defining the pl...
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  • Curiosity and research can help you find and develop a game idea.
  • The publisher must commit funds to game development. The retailer must commit funds and shelf space to selling the game. The customer must commit funds and time to buy and play the game. All of these decisions stem from a game concept with a clear description of the player’s role in the game.
  • Player-centric game design focuses on the representative player.
  • The most expensive console machine will never be as powerful as the most expensive personal computer, because high-end PCs cost about ten times as much as high-end consoles.
  • The biggest disadvantage to developing games for a personal computer is the lack of a standard configuration. Hardware and software can vary from one machine to the next.
  • These devices are niche markets with fewer opportunities for game developers, but they DO provide interactive entertainment .
  • Transcript of "Chapter 7"

    1. 1. Fundamentals of nd Game Design, 2 Edition by Ernest Adams Chapter 3: Game Concepts
    2. 2. Objectives    Take a game idea and add the necessary material to make it into a design concept Define the player’s role or roles in the game Know the different genres of games and think about which one your game may belong to © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 2
    3. 3. Objectives (Cont.)    Know how to choose a target audience and understand the special considerations associated with designing for specialized markets Plan the progress of your game Understand the differences among the kinds of game machines and how these differences affect the way people play on them © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 3
    4. 4. Getting an Idea  You can find game ideas anywhere     Dreams of doing something or achieving a goal From media such as books or movies From other games When evaluating ideas, remember that the game must provide entertainment © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 4
    5. 5. From Idea to Game Concept   A game concept is a description with enough detail to discuss it as a commercial product A game concept should include:       High concept statement Player’s role in the game Proposed primary gameplay mode Genre Target audience Hardware © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc.      Licenses Competition modes General summary of progression Short description of the game world Key characters, if any Chapter 3 Game Concepts 5
    6. 6. The Player’s Role  Define the role    What is the player going to do? Most important part of the game concept Make the definition clear and simple   Help the player understand the goals and rules Help publisher, retailer, and customer decide to buy the game © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 6
    7. 7. Choosing a Genre   A genre is a category of games characterized by a particular set of challenges, regardless of setting or game-world content Many players buy a particular genre because they like the type of challenges it offers © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 7
    8. 8. Classic Game Genres     Action games—physical challenges Strategy games—strategic, tactical, and logistical challenges Role-playing games—tactical, logistical, exploration, and economic challenges Real-world simulations (sports games and vehicle simulations) —physical and tactical challenges © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 8
    9. 9. Classic Game Genres (Cont.)    Construction and management games— economic and conceptual challenges Adventure games—exploration and puzzlesolving challenges Puzzle games—logic and conceptual challenges © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 9
    10. 10. Hybrid Games    Games that cross genres Risky because it might alienate some of your target audience The most successful hybrid is the actionadventure   Mostly action Include a story and puzzles that give them some of the quality of adventure games © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 10
    11. 11. Defining Your Target Audience   Who will buy the game? The representative player is a member of your target audience © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 11
    12. 12. The Dangers of Binary Thinking    Binary thinking—assumes that if group A likes a thing, everyone outside that group WON’T like it Interests overlap among groups Avoid exclusionary material © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 12
    13. 13. The Dangers of Binary Thinking (Cont.)   Core versus casual—the most significant method of grouping players Other groups that exhibit trends in gameplaying preferences:      Men and women Children and adults Boys and girls Players with disabilities Players of other cultures © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 13
    14. 14. Progression Considerations   Players need to feel they are making progress when playing long games Progress can be implemented through    Levels Story Both © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 14
    15. 15. Types of Game Machines  Home game consoles     Simpler, bolder graphics than a PC provides Standard controller Excellent for multiplayer local games Slower computing and less storage space than a personal computer © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 15
    16. 16. Types of Game Machines (Cont.)  Personal computer       Keyboard, mouse, joystick Very high-resolution graphics Intended for a single user Internet connection is common License or special equipment not needed for game development No standard configuration © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 16
    17. 17. Types of Game Machines (Cont.)  Handheld game machines     Very popular and inexpensive Fewer control mechanisms Small LCD screen Less storage space than a PC or console © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 17
    18. 18. Types of Game Machines (Cont.)  Mobile phones and wireless devices     Little memory or processing power No standard specifications Can provide portable networked play License not required for game development  (Apple’s iPhone is an exception) © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 18
    19. 19. Types of Game Machines (Cont.)  Other devices    Personal digital assistants Video gambling machines Arcade machines © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 19
    20. 20. Summary  You should now understand       Defining a game concept Creating a high concept document Defining the player’s role Identifying game genres Choosing the target audience Selecting the game machine © 2009 by Pearson Education, Inc. Chapter 3 Game Concepts 20
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