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The aim of this presentation is to share lessons learned from using a project performance management system that is based on Earned Schedule Management....

The aim of this presentation is to share lessons learned from using a project performance management system that is based on Earned Schedule Management.

Earned Schedule Management is a new method created by Walt Lipke in 2003.

Chris Vizzuett has project management experience in Latin America and Australia. He has been involved in a huge variety of projects (i.e. information technology, process redesign, enterprise architecture, mine expansions and water infrastructure). Chris holds a Master Degree in Project Management by the University of Southern Queensland and he is also PMP Certified.   Chris was the project manager during the implementation of the first Enterprise Architecture in Mexico. He is currently working for Kellogg, Brown and Root as a Deputy Project Manager in a large scale water infrastructure project.
He can be contacted at chris.vizzuett@kbr.com

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  • In the last couple of years, 68% of the projects were cancelled, or faced cost overruns, schedule overruns or were not fit for purpose. If this number is true, this means that every time any of us start a new project, we will only have one in three chances to succeed…that is pretty scary. The project that I will talk about today was part of this statistic , but a new project management team was brought over to turn around the project and deliver it on time.
  • In the next twenty minutes, I will talk about lessons learned from using a new technique called Earned Schedule Management and it was first released in 2003 by Walt Lipke. First I will quickly talk about the challenges we found in the project and the dashboard used. Then I will explain why Earned Schedule Management is a method that delivers better results than Earned Value Management. Finally, I will share some lessons learned. As this a quick 20 minute presentation, I would suggest to go through the presentation and then open a Q&A session.
  • First let me talk about the Northern Network Alliance or NNA NNA is delivering $450 million of water infrastructure, to provide water supply between Noosa and North Pine, as an extension of the South East Queensland water grid. NNA includes design, construction and commissioning of a 48 km water pipeline, pump stations, water quality management facilities. There are three projects under the Alliance: Design Construction Corridor Design and Construction are pretty straightforward. The scope of the Corridor project is to acquire the land needed to build the pipe, obtain the necessary government approvals, ensure all the environmental permits are in place. Additional teams form part of the Corridor project, they provide support such as satellite mapping, community liaison, structural surveys, etc. I will talk about the Corridor project, I was assigned as Deputy Project Manager in early 2009.
  • Back in early 2009, these were the challenges that the new project management team found. First, a detailed scope statement was not available. This does not mean that each team leader did not know what to do, but it means that the project did not have an integrated view of all the effort and verifiable pieces of work Then, a schedule was in place but with not a lot of detail. Level-of-effort bars were put into the programme but with long durations, in my opinion it did not help to identify relevant gates of a sequence of activities. Also, the Construction team had a bunch of dates when they planned to start but there was no way we could forecast whether those target dates could be achieved or not. As a consequence, it was not possible to “marry” progress vs specific deliverables. As you may imagine stakeholders did not have visibility on the progress or problems to tackle…
  • We knew we had to be able to answer these questions in a consistent manner to turn things around. (Make a pause) By doing this, we would be able to gain trust from the client and influence a change of behaviour in the eight teams that formed the Corridor project. So, planning started from scratch using a deliverable-based approach and then we ended up identifying approximately 3 thousand deliverables. Examples of deliverables are: construction licences, tunneling permits, environmental plans, etc. A deliverable-based planning approach was used because the only way to answer these questions was using Earned Value Management...but an additional step was made...we used a very new technique called Earned Schedule Management
  • We knew we had to be able to answer these questions in a consistent manner to turn things around. (Make a pause) By doing this, we would be able to gain trust from the client and influence a change of behaviour in the eight teams that formed the Corridor project. So, planning started from scratch using a deliverable-based approach and then we ended up identifying approximately 3 thousand deliverables. Examples of deliverables are: construction licences, tunneling permits, environmental plans, etc. A deliverable-based planning approach was used because the only way to answer these questions was using Earned Value Management...but an additional step was made...we used a very new technique called Earned Schedule Management
  • We knew we had to be able to answer these questions in a consistent manner to turn things around. (Make a pause) By doing this, we would be able to gain trust from the client and influence a change of behaviour in the eight teams that formed the Corridor project. So, planning started from scratch using a deliverable-based approach and then we ended up identifying approximately 3 thousand deliverables. Examples of deliverables are: construction licences, tunneling permits, environmental plans, etc. A deliverable-based planning approach was used because the only way to answer these questions was using Earned Value Management...but an additional step was made...we used a very new technique called Earned Schedule Management
  • We knew we had to be able to answer these questions in a consistent manner to turn things around. (Make a pause) By doing this, we would be able to gain trust from the client and influence a change of behaviour in the eight teams that formed the Corridor project. So, planning started from scratch using a deliverable-based approach and then we ended up identifying approximately 3 thousand deliverables. Examples of deliverables are: construction licences, tunneling permits, environmental plans, etc. A deliverable-based planning approach was used because the only way to answer these questions was using Earned Value Management...but an additional step was made...we used a very new technique called Earned Schedule Management
  • We knew we had to be able to answer these questions in a consistent manner to turn things around. (Make a pause) By doing this, we would be able to gain trust from the client and influence a change of behaviour in the eight teams that formed the Corridor project. So, planning started from scratch using a deliverable-based approach and then we ended up identifying approximately 3 thousand deliverables. Examples of deliverables are: construction licences, tunneling permits, environmental plans, etc. A deliverable-based planning approach was used because the only way to answer these questions was using Earned Value Management...but an additional step was made...we used a very new technique called Earned Schedule Management
  • We knew we had to be able to answer these questions in a consistent manner to turn things around. (Make a pause) By doing this, we would be able to gain trust from the client and influence a change of behaviour in the eight teams that formed the Corridor project. So, planning started from scratch using a deliverable-based approach and then we ended up identifying approximately 3 thousand deliverables. Examples of deliverables are: construction licences, tunneling permits, environmental plans, etc. A deliverable-based planning approach was used because the only way to answer these questions was using Earned Value Management...but an additional step was made...we used a very new technique called Earned Schedule Management
  • So this is the way the five fundamental questions are answered on a weekly basis. Every week, I sit down individually with each of the eight team leaders to check progress on the activities finished and, if necessary reforecast. Then, the dashboard is produced. The next day, Friday morning, the team leaders, myself and the Corridor project management discuss progress, performance and next steps.
  • (SHOW SNAPSHOTS) Real progress: This section in the dashboard shows this week’s progress vs. planned progress (or EV vs PV)
  • (SHOW SNAPSHOTS) Performance: This is SPI(t), the project manager defined that underperformance of more than 20% was enough to enter into the “red zone” and take corrective action.
  • (SHOW SNAPSHOTS) Weeks ahead/behind: this is SV(t) using earned schedule. The “red zone” starts whith a delay of three weeks.
  • (SHOW SNAPSHOTS) Forecast duration: this calculates completion date based on current performance.
  • (SHOW SNAPSHOTS) This section shows specific deliverables we want to follow up
  • (SHOW SNAPSHOTS) Please note that this section of the dashboard is calculated using Earned Schedule
  • Ok, so we talked about the five fundamental questions we have been answering using Earned Schedule Management. Now it is time to take a look at Earned Schedule Management and how it is different from Earned Value Management.
  • So, how is Earned Schedule Management different from Earned Value Management and how does it work? First, I need to take a quick look to Earned Value Management As you may remember, there are always three parameters present in EVM: Planned Value, Actual Cost and Earned Value With these three parameters a series of indexes and ratios can be obtained (show CV, CPI, EAC, ETC, SV, SPI) It has been documented that CV, CPI, ETC, EAC (all these are indexes from the cost side of the project) are very accurate but there is a problem with the schedule side.
  • Problem 1 is that schedule indexes are not clear: in this example EV is $4M vs a PV of $5M. Using the “traditional technique” (SV= EV-PV), Schedule Variance is $1M. So, the project is $1M behind schedule…I guess it is confusing because it uses “cost language” to explain schedule.
  • Problem 2 is that SPI becomes irrelevant when a project faces serious delays. In the second example, the project should have finished but is running late with a SPI of 0.6.
  • Then the problem appears in the following reporting periods because SPI shows performance is improving. How can performance improve if the project is already late? The answer is in the way the “traditional” SPI is calculated…because it always tends to 1.0
  • These problems are not new, they have even been acknowledged in PMI’s EVM Standard…. ” These SV and SPI measures are useful indicators…. But because they are based on work and not time, they can behave in ways that are not normally expected of schedule indicators and predictors”
  • Additionally, the Standard says SPI and SV are “…fine if the work is being accomplished according to plan, but problematic if not” I guess with this evidence we can say that EVM works fine for cost but not for the schedule dimension of the project.
  • Lets take a look at how Earned Schedule management works and how, combined with EVM, can be a very powerful tool for project managers. First, I need to say that Earned Schedule Management can not exist without the three basic parameters discussed previously. So if you hear someone saying that ESM will eliminate the need for EVM, you can tell that person he is wrong. Earned Schedule Management is an alternative and more accurate way to measure and forecast the schedule dimension of a project. It was created by Walk Lipke in 2003. ESM uses two concepts: Actual time and Earned schedule. These two concepts are the basis for measuring performance and forecasting duration. Actual time is easy, it reflects how many weeks have passed since the beginning of the project. There may be cases where a project is updated monthly, so Actual Time will represent the number of months since the project started Earned schedule is also easy, it represents the number of weeks that, according to the plan, would have taken to achieve the current progress…or Earned Value…
  • This technique also calculates Schedule Variance. So in order to differentiate Schedule Variance from the EVM technique, a (t) is added to SV(t). Schedule variance is calculated subtracting actual time less earned schedule SV(t)=ES-AT. If SV(t) shows a negative result, it means the project is weeks behind schedule, if the number if positive it means the project is ahead of schedule. Schedule Performance Index also has a (t) and tells us how productive we are in terms use of time. Similar to EVM, it is possible to determine Estimate To Complete ETC(t) and Estimate At Completion EAC(t) using time units rather than cost units.
  • Ok, so we talked about how Earned Schedule Management provides better results than Earned Value Management when we need to calculate the schedule side of the project. The next step is to talk about some lessons learned during the last year with the use of the dashboard and Earned Schedule Management. But first, let me ask you something: Please raise your hands those who have worked in a project that used a dashboard to monitor performance? Ok, now please raise your hand those who found the dashboard useful and reliable source of information? You know? I believe one of the reasons of this is that reporting project performance can be too complicated...
  • The first lesson I learned is to keep it simple The first versions of the dashboard had all these data…and more than one team leader looked at the dashboard and gave me the “what are you talking about” look. For people like us, project managers who like project performance, all these metrics are very interesting….but the rest of the people do not care. The Corridor team was formed by accomplished environmental scientists, intelligent urban planners, experienced engineers, etc…the weekly dashboard had to be customised to suit their needs. We kept is simple by only using the essential information…but the “aha!” moment came when the team leaders started developing their own language to these metrics.
  • The first lesson I learned is to keep it simple The first versions of the dashboard had all these data…and more than one team leader looked at the dashboard and gave me the “what are you talking about” look. For people like us, project managers who like project performance, all these metrics are very interesting….but the rest of the people do not care. The Corridor team was formed by accomplished environmental scientists, intelligent urban planners, experienced engineers, etc…the weekly dashboard had to be customised to suit their needs. We kept is simple by only using the essential information…but the “aha!” moment came when the team leaders started developing their own language to these metrics.
  • Transparency leads to accountability and some people will be happy and some people will not be happy because underperformance can not be hidden anymore…so expect some pushback. I remember when a team leader said his scope could not be measured because his process was too complex…but if you think about it, massive military projects use these techniques to measure performance. Project managers need to be willing to really read between the lines to understand why a person is resisting. It turned out that that he was worried because part of his scope was to obtain approvals from local and federal agencies and in some cases it could take between 3 weeks and 3 months to get the decision. He was worried about how his performance would look like if the worst case scenario happened. In my experience, everybody is happy if numbers show a good performance, but project managers need to be prepare to demonstrate that metrics are solid because when performance goes to the “red zone” the honeymoon is over.
  • It takes time, patience and a huge team work effort to put together the necessary pieces to set up a project performance management system. So, project managers, if you want to implement something like this you must be willing to invest the time at the beginning to define scope up to a deliverable level, define and challenge assumptions, resource the schedule of works, and to constantly challenge the numbers…
  • It took weeks, between 3 and 4, to set up the project performance system with the following architecture (show architecture).
  • The only way a performance management mechanism like this can work is through hands-on, active managerial support. In my view, what I would expect from a project manager like you is the following: Communicate early in the project the way you plan to monitor performance. This will define expectations. Help to define the scope and provide input to build sound assumptions. Be involved when explaining to team members how project performance management works. If team members perceive that you understand and value this method they will feel it is not only fancy graphs and nice colors. Be consistent when reviewing performance. If you defined weekly reviews, attend the weekly reviews and use the information. (Lead by example) Be prepared to challenge constantly the assumptions, numbers, and trends…this will help to strengthen the project performance measurement system.
  • The only way a performance management mechanism like this can work is through hands-on, active managerial support. In my view, what I would expect from a project manager like you is the following: Communicate early in the project the way you plan to monitor performance. This will define expectations. Help to define the scope and provide input to build sound assumptions. Be involved when explaining to team members how project performance management works. If team members perceive that you understand and value this method they will feel it is not only fancy graphs and nice colors. Be consistent when reviewing performance. If you defined weekly reviews, attend the weekly reviews and use the information. (Lead by example) Be prepared to challenge constantly the assumptions, numbers, and trends…this will help to strengthen the project performance measurement system.
  • The only way a performance management mechanism like this can work is through hands-on, active managerial support. In my view, what I would expect from a project manager like you is the following: Communicate early in the project the way you plan to monitor performance. This will define expectations. Help to define the scope and provide input to build sound assumptions. Be involved when explaining to team members how project performance management works. If team members perceive that you understand and value this method they will feel it is not only fancy graphs and nice colors. Be consistent when reviewing performance. If you defined weekly reviews, attend the weekly reviews and use the information. (Lead by example) Be prepared to challenge constantly the assumptions, numbers, and trends…this will help to strengthen the project performance measurement system.
  • The only way a performance management mechanism like this can work is through hands-on, active managerial support. In my view, what I would expect from a project manager like you is the following: Communicate early in the project the way you plan to monitor performance. This will define expectations. Help to define the scope and provide input to build sound assumptions. Be involved when explaining to team members how project performance management works. If team members perceive that you understand and value this method they will feel it is not only fancy graphs and nice colors. Be consistent when reviewing performance. If you defined weekly reviews, attend the weekly reviews and use the information. (Lead by example) Be prepared to challenge constantly the assumptions, numbers, and trends…this will help to strengthen the project performance measurement system.
  • The only way a performance management mechanism like this can work is through hands-on, active managerial support. In my view, what I would expect from a project manager like you is the following: Communicate early in the project the way you plan to monitor performance. This will define expectations. Help to define the scope and provide input to build sound assumptions. Be involved when explaining to team members how project performance management works. If team members perceive that you understand and value this method they will feel it is not only fancy graphs and nice colors. Be consistent when reviewing performance. If you defined weekly reviews, attend the weekly reviews and use the information. (Lead by example) Be prepared to challenge constantly the assumptions, numbers, and trends…this will help to strengthen the project performance measurement system.
  • The only way a performance management mechanism like this can work is through hands-on, active managerial support. In my view, what I would expect from a project manager like you is the following: Communicate early in the project the way you plan to monitor performance. This will define expectations. Help to define the scope and provide input to build sound assumptions. Be involved when explaining to team members how project performance management works. If team members perceive that you understand and value this method they will feel it is not only fancy graphs and nice colors. Be consistent when reviewing performance. If you defined weekly reviews, attend the weekly reviews and use the information. (Lead by example) Be prepared to challenge constantly the assumptions, numbers, and trends…this will help to strengthen the project performance measurement system.
  • Finally, I would like to add that I believe Earned Schedule Management will continue as an emerging trend and will become a very powerful tool for all of us. IF we embrace this technique, it will give us a competitive advantage over the rest of the project practitioners. Please feel free to send me an email to talk about this topic, consulting opportunities, or whatever you want to discuss. Thank you for your time

Earned Schedule Management - lessons learned Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Project performance management – Chris Vizzuett PMP © If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 2. 68% 1 The Chaos Report 2009, Standish Consulting Group 1 1 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 3. Performance dashboard Earned Schedule vs Earned Value Mgmt Lessons learned 2 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 4. Northern Network Alliance $450M water infrastructure 48km pipeline, pump stations and water management facilities Design, Construction, Corridor 3 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 5. Corridor project - challenges Scope statement Integrated schedule Forecasting and status Progress vs deliverables 4 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 6. Five fundamental questions 5 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 7. What is the current progress? (…I mean, real progress) Five fundamental questions 5 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 8. What is the current progress? (…I mean, real progress) How productively are we using our time ? Five fundamental questions 5 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 9. What is the current progress? (…I mean, real progress) How productively are we using our time ? How many weeks is the project ahead/behind plan? Five fundamental questions 5 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 10. What is the current progress? (…I mean, real progress) How productively are we using our time ? How many weeks is the project ahead/behind plan? How are key deliverables going? Five fundamental questions 5 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 11. What is the current progress? (…I mean, real progress) How productively are we using our time ? How many weeks is the project ahead/behind plan? How are key deliverables going? Will the project need more time to finish? Five fundamental questions 5 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 12. Current progress Schedule Performance Forecast duration Weeks ahead/behind Key deliverables 6 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 13. Current progress Performance Forecast duration Weeks ahead/behind Critical path (key deliverables) 7 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 14. Current progress Schedule Performance Forecast duration Weeks ahead/behind Critical path (key deliverables) SPI (t) 8 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 15. Current progress Performance Weeks ahead behind Critical path (key deliverables) 9 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 16. Current progress Forecast duration Critical path (key deliverables ) 10 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 17. Current progress Key deliverables Performance Forecast duration Weeks ahead/behind 11 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 18. Current progress Key deliverables Performance Forecast duration Weeks ahead/behind Earned Earned Schedule Management 12 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 19. Performance dashboard Earned Schedule vs Earned Value Mgmt Lessons learned 13 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 20. PV AC EV CV= EV-AC CPI= EV/AC ETC= (BAC-EV)/CPI EAC= AC+ETC SV= EV-PV SPI= EV/PV A quick look at Earned Value Mgmnt… 14 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 21. Problem 1: cost language explains schedule PV $5M EV $4M SV=EV-PV “ The project is $1M behind schedule” 15 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 22. Problem 2: SPI may be misleading PV $10M EV $6M 16 0.6 SPI= EV/PV If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 23. PV $10M 0.6 1.0 0.7 0.8 0.9 SPI= EV/PV EV $10M “ Schedule Performance is improving” 16 Problem 2: SPI may be misleading If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 24. “ SV and SPI measures are useful indicators … but because they are based on work and not time, they can behave in ways that are not normally expected of schedule indicators and predictors” 17 The PMI acknowledges that… If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 25. [SPI and SV are] “…fine if the work is being accomplished according to plan, but problematic if not” pp. 18 Practice Standard for Earned Value Management, PMI 2005 17 “ SV and SPI measures are useful indicators … but because they are based on work and not time, they can behave in ways that are not normally expected of schedule indicators and predictors” The PMI acknowledges that… If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 26. Earned Schedule Management Actual Time Earned Schedule 18 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 27. SV (t) = ES-AT 5 weeks behind schedule SPI (t) = ES/AT 0.5 (underperforming) ETC (t) = (TD-ES)/ SPI (t) If current performance persists, it is likely that it will take 20 weeks to finish the remaining scope EAC (t) = AT+ETC Likely total duration of the project is 25 weeks Earned Schedule Management Actual Time Earned Schedule 18 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 28. Performance dashboard Earned Schedule vs Earned Value Mgmt Lessons learned 19 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 29. Lesson learned 1 Keep things simple PV EV CV CPI EAC SPI (t) SV(t) EAC (t) ETC(t) Schedule adherence 20 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 30. Lesson learned 1 Keep things simple PV EV CV CPI EAC SPI (t) SV(t) EAC (t) ETC(t) Schedule adherence SPI (t) SV (t) EAC (t) Key deliverables 20 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 31. LL #2 Transparency leads to accountability … expect some pushback 21 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 32.
    • LL #3 it takes time and patience
    22 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 33.
    • LL #3 it takes time and patience
    Architecture 22 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 34.
    • LL#4 Active support from the top
    23 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 35.
    • LL#4 Active support from the top
    Communicate 23 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 36.
    • LL#4 Active support from the top
    Communicate Help 23 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 37.
    • LL#4 Active support from the top
    Communicate Help Be involved 23 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 38.
    • LL#4 Active support from the top
    Communicate Help Be involved Be consistent 23 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 39.
    • LL#4 Active support from the top
    Communicate Help Be involved Be consistent Challenge 23 If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]
  • 40. Happy to discuss, anytime… Chris Vizzuett Deputy Project Manager, Corridor Project Northern Network Alliance [email_address] www.nnalliance.com.au If you wish a transcript of the presentation email me [email_address]