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Gardening sheet   celtis reticulata
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Gardening sheet celtis reticulata

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  • 1. *Netleaf hackberry – Celtis reticulata/ C. laevigata var. reticulata (SEL-tiss ree-tic-cu-LAY-tuh ) Family: Cannabaceae (Hemp Family) Native to: Scattered through western N. America from KS and WA to CA. Locally in foothills of Riverside & San Bernardino Counties, Mojave Desert; usually in bottomlands, washes, ravines, arroyos or rocky canyons, with scattered individuals in desert shrubland/grassland communities. Growth characteristics: woody shrub/tress mature height: 10-30+ ft. mature width: 20-30 ft. Deciduous woody shrub or small tree. Short trunk and open wide spreading crown with crooked branches forms rounded or weeping shape. Bark gray, cork-like. Leaves simple, dark green with toothed margin, prominent veins beneath and a sandpapery texture. Moderate to slow growth; long-lived (at least 100 years). Attractive even in winter, when it loses its leaves. Blooms/fruits: Blooms March-May. Flowers small, yellow-green, inconspicuous. Fruits are fleshy, dark red when ripe and sweet. Edible raw or cooked and make nice jelly, syrup or sauces. Uses in the garden: Mostly used as a water-wise shade tree throughout West. Nice size for yards, patios. Fine with winter flooding, so a candidate for rain gardens. Excellent habitat plant. Tough but pleasing appearance: tolerates heat, cold, garden conditions. Leaves/branches for redbrown dye. Sensible substitute for: Non-native shade trees. Attracts: Excellent bird habitat: provides cover, nest sites and fruits that persist on tree in winter. Requirements: Element Requirement Sun Full sun to part-shade. Soil Likes well-drained soils; tolerant of alkali soils. Water Tolerant of wide range but drought-tolerant once establish. Water infrequently, but deeply, in summer (Water Zone 1-2 or even 2). Fertilizer Not needed. Fine with light fertilizer. Other Inorganic or thin organic mulch layer is best. Management: Prune when young to raise canopy, produce interesting shape. Other than that, pretty easy to manage. Some fruit drop and leaf drop in fall/winter. Propagation: from seed: fresh best (120 day cold/moist for stored); slow by cuttings: yes Plant/seed sources (see list for source numbers): 5, 8, 10, 16, 19, 30, 31, 45 3/30/14 * not native to western Los Angeles County, but a CA native © Project SOUND

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