Beautiful butterflies   2014
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Beautiful butterflies 2014

on

  • 106 views

Talk on how to design a small butterfly garden using California native and other plants.

Talk on how to design a small butterfly garden using California native and other plants.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
106
Views on SlideShare
106
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Beautiful butterflies 2014 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. © Project SOUND Out of the Wilds and Into Your Garden Gardening with California Native Plants in Western L.A. County Project SOUND – 2014 (our 10th year)
  • 2. © Project SOUND More Beautiful Butterflies: food and habitat for our prettiest pollinators C.M. Vadheim and T. Drake CSUDH & Madrona Marsh Preserve Madrona Marsh Preserve July 5 & 8, 2014
  • 3. The garden at 112 Willow St.  “Designing Your New CA Garden’ series – Mother Nature’s Backyard blog - http://mother-natures- backyard.blogspot.com/2013 /07/designing-your-new- california-garden-1.html). © Project SOUND  July, 2013 – Aug/Sept, 2014  Needed an example that was typical of a small S. CA yard
  • 4. The garden at 112 Willow St. © Project SOUND
  • 5. The garden at 112 Willow St. 6 functional areas :  Quiet/meditation  Maintenance  Vegetable Garden  Native Grass Lawn  Shady Seating  Butterfly Garden © Project SOUND
  • 6. Recently been working on hardscape © Project SOUND
  • 7. But our task today is to design the Butterfly Garden © Project SOUND Mowed native lawn Butterfly Garden Apple tree Seating area Porch/patio with roof
  • 8. The photo that inspired our gardeners © Project SOUND http://anythingispossibletravel.com/almost-heaven/
  • 9. What do we like about it?  Relaxed, natural appearance  Small size  Native plants  Butterflies & other pollinators visit  Some color – but natural – not like Disneyland  Sunny  Easy access  Could have seating that allowed enjoying it © Project SOUND Clearly someone really likes being in this garden; ‘Life-friendly’ for humans and others
  • 10. How does our Butterfly Garden stack up? © Project SOUND  Relaxed, natural appearance  Small size  Native plants  Butterflies & other pollinators visit  Some color – but natural – not like Disneyland  Sunny  Easy access  Seating that allows enjoying it  Life-friendly We’ll need to carefully choose our plants to maximize
  • 11. Butterfly Garden  Soil: clay loam  Drainage: good (slight slope; drier on top)  Full sun  Water Zone: 2 (tentative)  Watered with soaker hose  Other:  Afternoon breeze  Nice views behind (to south)  5 ft wood fence behind  Visible from house, porch, ‘shady seating area’, ‘lawn’  Near ‘vegetable garden’  Mulched (if appropriate) © Project SOUND
  • 12. UCR Botanic garden – Butterfly Garden © Project SOUND
  • 13. © Project SOUND https://www.facebook.com/UCRBGfriends UCR Botanic garden – Butterfly Garden
  • 14. Attributes of the Butterfly Garden  Fits overall theme for garden: ‘food for all’  Plants  Provide food for butterfly adults, larva or both  Suitable for clay-loam soil  Tolerate full sun  Tolerate modest slope  Water Zone 2 or less  Purple/blue and yellow flowers (if possible)  Something in bloom early spring through fall  Hardscape  Soaker hose irrigation  Chipped bark mulch (if appropriate for plants)  Bird bath; drinking saucers for butterflies © Project SOUND
  • 15. Butterfly habitat garden: dimensions © Project SOUND 46’ 23’ 8’ 6’
  • 16. Butterfly habitat garden: reality check © Project SOUND 8’ 6’ 4’ 3’ Conclusion: butterfly garden is not wide enough – will look bad
  • 17. Revised garden plan increases its size © Project SOUND 8’ 8’ 46’ 23’
  • 18. Reality check: still not much space © Project SOUND 8’ 6’ 4’2’ Plants will be closely spaced – the Coastal Sage Scrub look
  • 19. Space in the ‘Butterfly Garden’ - limited (1) 8 ft diameter (large shrub) (6) 6 ft diameter (Salvia size) (6-7) 4 ft diameter (Buckwheat size) (5-10+) 3 ft or less (perennial/fill) Annual wildflowers Grass lawn – for skippers  We like the formal look of the borders in the UCR Garden; plants soften the edges © Project SOUND
  • 20. Add a border between garden and grass © Project SOUND B 8’ 6’ 2’ 4’ Border material (stone; man-made) will be semi-formal and same warm gray as rest of path materials
  • 21. © Project SOUND Here’s what it looks like from the porch
  • 22. © Project SOUND Let’s add the largest plant first
  • 23. Qualities of the small tree/large shrub  8-9 ft wide, maximum  Not too tall (8-10 ft) unless narrow  Evergreen  Somewhat neat appearance  Attract the most butterflies (or different from those attracted by smaller plants)  Added points for:  Attractive flowers  Flowering time  Fruits  Scents © Project SOUND Cercocarpus montanus
  • 24. Best butterfly choices for tree/large shrub  Lavatera assurgentiflora  Populus spp.  Prunus spp.  Prunus ilicifolia ssp. ilicifolia  Quercus spp.  Quercus berberidifolia/dumosa  Rhamnus spp.  Ribes spp.  *Aesculus californica  Alnus species  *Amorpha californica  *Arbutus menziesii  Arctostaphylos (large forms)  Atriplex lentiformis ssp. breweri  Baccharis salicifolia  *Ceanothus cuneatus var. cuneatus  Cercocarpus spp.  *Chilopsis linearis  *Frangula californica © Project SOUND
  • 25. Best butterfly choices for tree/large shrub  Lavatera assurgentiflora  Populus spp.  Prunus spp.  Prunus ilicifolia ssp. ilicifolia  Quercus spp.  Quercus berberidifolia/dumosa  Rhamnus spp.  Ribes spp.  Salix spp.  *Aesculus californica  Alnus species  *Amorpha californica  *Arbutus menziesii  Arctostaphylos (large forms)  Atriplex lentiformis ssp. breweri  Baccharis salicifolia  *Ceanothus cuneatus var. cuneatus  Cercocarpus spp.  *Chilopsis linearis  *Frangula californica © Project SOUND
  • 26. What’s the CA state butterfly? © Project SOUND
  • 27. California Dogface - Zerene eurydice  State insect since 1972. California was the first state to choose a state insect.  Its endemic range is limited CA from San Diego County north to Sonoma County.  The ‘dogface’ name comes from a wing pattern resembling a dog’s face (some think it looks like a poodle) which is found on the male of the species.  Its wings are an iridescent bluish-black, orange and sulfur-yellow in color. The female has a small black dot on each of its yellow forewings.  Rare/local – primarily in foothill chaparral, woodlands © Project SOUND http://butterflyfarms.org/california-dogface/ female http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/California_dogface_butterfly
  • 28. California Dogface - Zerene eurydice  Larvae feed on Amorpha californica, CA false indigo.  Adults feed on flower nectar – particularly fond of purple flowers.  In the California chaparral and woodlands habitats of the Santa Ana Mountains, the adult California Dogface butterflies can be seen nectaring at thistles: natives (Cirsium occidentale) and introduced invasive species.  They are hard to get close to and hard to photograph because they fly very fast. © Project SOUND http://socalbutterflies.com/pieridae_html/calif_dog.htm
  • 29. © Project SOUND California false indigo – Amorpha californica http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/amorpha-californica
  • 30.  Coastal ranges from N. CA to AZ, Baja  Santa Monica Mtns, San Gabriel mountains, Griffith Park  Dry slopes in Yellow Pine Forest, Chaparral, Mixed Evergreen Forest, Northern Oak Woodland; stream banks © Project SOUND California false indigo – Amorpha californica var. californica http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?3691,3713,3714,3715 ©2011 Aaron Arthur http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/amorpha-californica
  • 31. © Project SOUND False indigo: large shrubby pea  Size: (varies w/ light)  5-8 ft tall  5-8 ft wide  Growth form:  Woody shrub; semi-deciduous  Rather irregular shape  Foliage:  Medium green  Leaves compound, large (1 ft) with simple leaflets  Plant noticeably hairy  Pleasant scent: guava, pineapple, lavender maybe a little pine  Larval food plant for CA State butterfly, the California Dogface (Zerene eurydice). ©2011 Aaron Arthur ©2010 Dee E. Warenycia
  • 32. © Project SOUND Flowers unique  Blooms: in spring; usually April-June  Flowers:  On dramatic, wand-like stalks  Purple-magenta fused sepals give the color  Anthers extend well beyond the sepals  Flower type typical for Amorpha  Seeds: in one-seeded pod; plant fresh seed or pre-chill 3 weeks prior to planting http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/amorpha-californica http://www.smmflowers.org/mobile/species/Amorpha_cal ifornica_californica.htm
  • 33. © Project SOUND Plant Requirements  Soils:  Texture: most  pH: any local [6.0-8.0]  Light:  Needs some shade; light shade to quite shady  Water:  Winter: needs good winter rains  Summer: best with some summer water – Zone 2 probably optimal for appearance  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils  Other: either difficult or easy – needs the right spot. Easy to prune or shape ©2004 Aaron Schusteff
  • 34. © Project SOUND False indigo: shade  Good choice in high or dappled shade under trees; woodsy appearance  To provide Dogface habitat  Back of bed shrub – north-facing  Large containers  In a scented garden http://mamba.bio.uci.edu/~pjbryant/biodiv/plants/Fabaceae/Amorpha%20cali fornica.htm http://www.smmflowers.org/mobile/species/Amorpha_californica_californica.htm http://www.smmflowers.org/mobile/species/Amorpha_californica_californica.htm
  • 35. The only possible place is in the quiet/ meditation area © Project SOUND ©2009 Thomas Stoughton
  • 36. Best butterfly choices for tree/large shrub  Lavatera assurgentiflora  Populus spp.  Prunus spp.  Prunus ilicifolia ssp. ilicifolia  Quercus spp.  Quercus berberidifolia/dumosa  Rhamnus spp.  Ribes spp.  Salix spp.  *Aesculus californica  Alnus species  *Amorpha californica  *Arbutus menziesii  Arctostaphylos (large forms)  Atriplex lentiformis ssp. breweri  Baccharis salicifolia  *Ceanothus cuneatus var. cuneatus  Cercocarpus spp.  *Chilopsis linearis  *Frangula californica © Project SOUND
  • 37. Can we eliminate any based on appearance? © Project SOUND Ceanothus cuneatus Cercocarpus montanus Frangula californica Prunus ilicifolia ssp. ilicifolia Rhamnus ilicifolia
  • 38. Comparison of four possibilities Plant Size Requirements Blooms Butterflies/etc. Cercocarpus montanus 6-12 ft tall 4-5 ft. wide Tree-like Sun/well-drained Water Zone 1-2, 2 Insig /Sp Hairstreaks Bees Frangula californica 6-12 ft t/ w smaller cultivars Shrub-like FS/PS Any soil Water 1-2 to 2-3 Insig /Sp Colored fruits Pale Swallowtail Painted Lady Gray Hairstreak Bees Fruit-eating birds Prunus ilicifolia ssp. ilicifolia 10-25 ft t 10-20 ft w Shrub-like FS/PS Any soil Water 1-2 to 2-3 White/Su Colored fruits Swallowtails Bees Humans Rhamnus ilicifolia 12 ft tall 5-6 ft w Shrub-like FS/PS/ FSH Any soil Water 1-2 to 2 Insig /Sp Colored fruits Pale Swallowtail Painted Lady Gray Hairstreak Bees /birds © Project SOUND
  • 39. © Project SOUND Tentative choice – more next month © 2005 James M. Andre
  • 40. © Project SOUND Add the large srub
  • 41. Space in the ‘Butterfly Garden’ - (1) 8 ft diameter (large shrub) (6) 6 ft diameter (Salvia size) (6-7) 4 ft diameter (Buckwheat size) (5-10+) 3 ft or less (perennial/fill) Grass lawn – for skippers © Project SOUND
  • 42. © Project SOUND We’ve got room for six 5-6 ft. shrubs
  • 43. We’ll have to choose the very best native butterfly plants  Eriogonum (Buckwheats)  Salvia (Sages)  Asclepias (Milkweeds)  Sunflower family  Herbs/vegetables (non-native)  Annual wildflowers  Grasses © Project SOUND
  • 44. Choices for 5-6 ft butterfly shrubs (n=6)  Eriogonum species  Eriogonum giganteum  Eriogonum fasciculatum  Eriogonum fasciculatum ‘Dana Point’  Mediterranean herbs  Lavender  Rosemary (bush type)  Salvia species  Salvia leucophylla  Salvia mellifera  Salvia clevelandii  Salvia clevelandii x S. leucophylla ‘Allen Chickering’ © Project SOUND
  • 45. Let’s look at the Salvias first © Project SOUND Salvia leucophylla Salvia clevelandii Salvia clevelandii ‘Winifred Gilman’ Salvia ‘Allen Chickering’
  • 46. Comparing the Salvia choices Name Shape Flowers Other Butterfly habitat Salvia leucophylla 4’ tall 5-6’ wide; spreading Light purple ; earlier Nice scent Gray-green foliage Excellent adult Salvia clevelandii 5’ x 5’; rounded Blue-purple; summer Nice scent Green foliage Excellent adult Salvia clevelandii ‘Winifred Gilman’ 5’ x 5’; rounded Intense blue-purple; Su Lovely scent Green foliage ? short-lived Excellent adult Salvia ‘Allen Chickering’ 4-5’ x 4-6’; spreading Medium lavender; Sp/Su Nice scent - different Gray-green foliage Excellent adult © Project SOUND
  • 47. Comparing the others: buckwheats/herbs © Project SOUND Eriogonum fasciculatum Eriogonum fasciculatum ‘Dana Point’ http://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-rosemary/ Rosemary http://www.addorganicgardening.com/lavender-flower-benefits/ Lavender
  • 48. What’s the deal about native buckwheats (Eriogonum spp)?  Almost all are good nectar/pollen sources for pollinators  Bloom late when other food sources aren’t available.  Eriogonum are used as food plants by larvae of some Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths). Some feed only on native buckwheats:  Apodemia mormo (Mormon metalmark) - feeds exclusively on Eriogonum  Apodemia mormo langei (Lange's metalmark) - only known from Eriogonum nudum ssp. auriculatum  Chionodes dammersi (moth) - feeds exclusively on Eriogonum  Chionodes luteogeminatus (moth) - only known from Eriogonum niveum  Euphilotes enoptes smithi (Smith's blue butterfly) - only known from Eriogonum latifolium and Eriogonum parvifolium © Project SOUND
  • 49. © Project SOUND California Buckwheat - Eriogonum fasciculatum
  • 50. © Project SOUND  var. fasciculatum: Dry slopes and canyons near the coast, coastal sage scrub – primarily Central CA coast  var. foliolosum: Sandy to gravelly flats, slopes & canyons , mixed grassland and chaparral communities, oak and conifer woodlands http://www.cnps.org/cnps/nativeplants/gallery/ingram/index.php var. fasciculatum var. foliolosum
  • 51. © Project SOUND Characteristics of California Buckwheat  Size: similar to Dune Buckwheat  2-5 ft tall  3-5 ft wide  Growth form:  low mounded semi-evergreen shrub  Many-branched ; dense  Neat appearance http://www.newportbay.org/plants/index.html  Foliage:  Leaves alternate, but densely clustered at nodes, evergreen, narrow lanceolate (nearly needle-like when dry)  Somewhat similar to Rosemary in appearance http://www.birdmom.net/wildflowerspink.html
  • 52. © Project SOUND CA Buckwheat: showy for months  Great for summer color: May-Nov. possible  As an alternative to the non- native Rosemary  In perennial beds  On parking strips & bordering paths and driveways  For erosion control  Larval foodsource for Mormon Metalmark, Bramble Hairstreak, Common Hairstreak, Avalon Hairstreak
  • 53. © Project SOUND CA Buckwheat cultivars make good groundcovers  ‘Dana Point’ - brighter green leaf, more mounding than species. Gets to be really large (6+ ft)  'Bruce Dickinson' – good for groundcover; stays close to the ground, spreads nicely, and holds good form throughout the year.  ‘Theodore Payne' – low groundcover (1 ft high; 1-3 ft spread)  'Warriner Lytle' - A sprawling low growing California buckwheat; can grow to 2 feet tall but is often more prostrate, hugging the ground like a mat ‘Dana Point’ ‘Warriner Lytle’
  • 54. Name Shape Flowers Other Butterfly habitat Eriogonum fasciculatum 2-3 ft tall 3-5 ft wide Pink – very pretty Summer Showy rust-color seeds in fall Adults (many) Larva: Morman Metalmark, Bramble Hairstreak, Common Hairstreak, Avalon Hairstreak Bees Pollinators Eriogonum fasciculatum ‘Dana Point’ 2-3 ft tall 5-6+ ft wide Pink – very pretty summer Showy rust-color seeds in fall Adults (many) Larva (see above) Bees Pollinators Rosemary < 2 ft tall spreading White Spring/summer Fragrant cooking herb Bees Hummingbirds Lavender 1-3 ft tall 1-4+ ft wide Size depends on cultivar Lavender flowers Summer Lovely fragrance Adults Bees Hummingbirds © Project SOUND Thyme Adults
  • 55. © Project SOUND We’ve got room for six 5-6 ft. shrubs Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Lavender Thyme
  • 56. Considering foliage color Green  Rhamnus/Frangula  Salvia clevelandii  Ergiogonum fasciculatum  Thyme Silver/white/gray  Salvia leucophylla  ? Lavender (choose appropriate)  ? Eriogonum cinereum (Ashyleaf buckwheat) © Project SOUND
  • 57. © Project SOUND Ashy-leaf Buckwheat – Eriogonum cinereum
  • 58. Plants in the Sunflower family are also good nectar and pollen sources © Project SOUND Early, mid- and late-season bloomers
  • 59. We can’t have a Butterfly Garden without sunflowers Width Early/Spring Summer Fall 5-6 ft Grindelia camporum Hazardia/Isocoma 4-5 ft Encelia californica *Perityle incana Grindelia hirsutula *Perityle incana Solidago spp *Viguiera parishii Ericameria ericoides *Ericameria nauseosa Solidago spp *Viguiera parishii < 3 ft filler Lasthenia spp Layia platyglossa Achillea millefolium Cirsium occidentale Helianthus annuus Heterotheca grandiflora Malacothrix saxatilis Pseudognaphalium canescens *Symphyotrichum chilense Achillea millefolium Pluchea odorata *Symphyotrichum chilense © Project SOUND Extra points for locally native species (in green) and adult/larval (bold)
  • 60. © Project SOUND California/Big Gum Plant Grindelia camporum var. bracteosa
  • 61. Include in your garden because of..  Attractive flowers Mar-Oct  Balsamic aroma  Tolerates any soil – well- drained is best  Drought tolerance  Easy to grow  Highly attractive for  Bees  Butterflies  Other insects (beetles; other unusual insects)  Birds (seeds)
  • 62. CA Gum Plant: big  Erect herbaceous perennial to 4 ft tall by 5+ ft wide  Grows in clay or sandy soil:  Dry stream banks, washes  Rocky fields & plains  Sandy or alkali bottomlands  Along road sides  Grows where it gets full sun  Is stress deciduous – loses leaves during dry periods
  • 63. © Project SOUND Do we have room for Big gum plant? Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 64. Who can resist a sunflower? © Project SOUND
  • 65. CA Bush Sunflower – Encelia californica
  • 66. CA Encelia is a great habitat plant – and it blooms early!  Flower petals (ray flowers)  Insects  Beetles  Butterfly larva: Monarch; Metalmarks;  Ground squirrels  Nectar/pollen  Bees  Butterflies  Seeds  Birds (eat seeds)  Goldfinches  Sparrows  Small mammals (mice)  Spiders (eat insects)  Green lynx spider
  • 67. © Project SOUND * San Diego Sunflower – Viguiera laciniata http://image57.webshots.com/157/1/52/8/2588152080044943617JdrPNe_fs.jpg
  • 68. © Project SOUND *Viguiera parishii – a desert species  Full sun  Very well-drained soils  Low water (Zone 1-2) http://www.delange.org/Viguiera/Viguiera.htm http://www.delange.org/Viguiera/Viguiera.htm http://www.azhikinggallery.com/galleryintro.asp?galleryid=spurcrossranch_042107
  • 69. © Project SOUND *Parish’s goldeneye – Viguiera (Bahiopsis) parishii
  • 70.  Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of CA, NV, AZ, northwestern Mexico  Dry mesas, washes & rocky slopes to 3500 ft.  Areas that get a little bit of extra water © Project SOUND *Parish’s goldeneye – Viguiera parishii http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-taxon=Bahiopsis+parishii http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_IJM.pl?tid=82217 ©2010 Lee Dittmann http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/viguiera-deltoidea-parishii
  • 71. © Project SOUND Parish’s goldeneye – rather Encelia-like  Size:  2-4 ft tall  2-4 ft wide  Growth form:  Half-woody (sub-shrub)  Overall shape mounded; many branches  Fast-growing  Foliage:  Gray green; stiff hairs  Triangular shape; fairly small (typical of desert shrubs)  Spicy sunflower fragrance  May be winter deciduous  Larval food for California Patch (Chlosyne californica)©2010 Thomas Stoughton
  • 72. © Project SOUND Sunflower heads with yellow disk flowers  Blooms:  After rains from Feb-June  After summer monsoon (or water) from Sept-Oct  Flowers:  In typical sunflower heads – 2 inches across  Disk flowers (center) are primarily yellow  Pretty as only sunflowers can be  Seeds:  Small and hairy; birds love them ©2010 Thomas Stoughton
  • 73. © Project SOUND Plant Requirements  Soils:  Texture: well drained- sand to clay  pH: any local  Light:  Full sun to very light shade  Water:  Winter: adequate  Summer: is drought tolerant (Water Zone 1-2 or 2) but best if given some water in August (monsoon)  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils  Other:  Cut back hard (to 6-8 inches; like CA Encelia) in winter dormant period  Inorganic or light organic mulch http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bahiopsis_parishii_3.jpg
  • 74. © Project SOUND Gardening with Parish’s goldeneye  As an attractive pot plant  Sunny slopes, rock gardens, desert-themed gardens  For habitat value (attracts many pollinators), fragrance and pretty flowers in mixed beds  Good on banks for erosion control ©2010 Neal Kramer http://www.abdnha.org/pages/03flora/family/asteraceae/viguiera_parishii.htm
  • 75. © Project SOUND We’ve still got room for 4-5 ft. shrubs Encelia californica; Viguiera parishii Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 76. Plenty of green foliage color… Green  Rhamnus/Frangula  Salvia clevelandii  Ergiogonum fasciculatum  Thyme  Encelia californica  Viguiera parishii Silver/white/gray  Salvia leucophylla  ? Lavender (choose appropriate)  Eriogonum cinerium (Ashyleaf buckwheat) © Project SOUND
  • 77. Nevin’s Wooly Sunflower/Catalina Silverlace Constancea (Eriophyllum) nevinii
  • 78. © Project SOUND * Guadalupe Island Rock Daisy – Perityle incana
  • 79. © Project SOUND * Guadalupe Island Rock Daisy – Perityle incana  Endemic to Guadalupe Island, Baja CA  Southernmost extent of California Floristic Province; similar to the Channel Islands of California  At least 35 species endemic to island; practically denuded by feral goats. http://www.sdsharkdiving.com/images/GuadRte.jpg http://www.people.carleton.edu/~mcass/Pangea/GIsland.JPG
  • 80. © Project SOUND The genus Perityle – the Rock Daisies  In Asteraceae (Sunflower family); native to western North America.  Commonly known as Rock daisies  Highly variable genus, including small herbs to spreading shrubs  Most have yellow or white ‘daisy’ flower heads.  The fruit is generally a flat seed with thickened margins which may or may not have a pappus or scales.  Perityle emoryi – annual  Other Perityles (Ca shrubby) from Desert Mountains (chiefly the White, Inyo Mountains) Perityle emoryi http://www.calflora.net/bloomingplants/rockdaisy.html
  • 81. © Project SOUND Somewhat similar to Catalina Silverlace  Size:  2-3 ft tall  3-5+ ft wide  Growth form:  Half-woody (sub-shrub); woody base  Mounded to irregular shape  Moderate growth rate  Foliage:  Silvery green (less white than Catalina Silverlace); hairy  Leaves incised; open appearance – very attractive  Frost tender Catalina Silverlace
  • 82. © Project SOUND Flowers provide a life-friendly treat  Blooms: spring into summer; April to July, intermittently  Flowers:  Small; in ‘heads’ somewhat like Mule Fat (minimal/no ray flowers)  Inflorescence above the foliage – very attractive  Lovely gold-yellow color  Attract many insects: pollinators, butterflies  Seeds:  Eaten by song birds
  • 83. © Project SOUND Drought tolerant  Soils:  Texture: best in sandy/rocky, but does fine in clay  pH: any local  Light:  Full sun coast; some afternoon shade in hot inland gardens  Water:  Winter: adequate; supplement if needed  Summer: occasional water – likes ‘summer monsoon’ in Aug. (will bloom after ‘rain’)  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils  Other: Cut back to 4-6 inches above wood after peak bloom for best shape http://www.sdnhm.org/research/guadalupe/p-perityle.html
  • 84. © Project SOUND Many ways to use  As a shrub in mixed beds with Salvias, Eriogonum, Encelia  Nice against a dark wall or shrubs  Good habitat plant  Useful as groundcover, fill  Even works in a container http://plantexplorer.longwoodgardens.org/weboi/oecgi2.exe/INET_ECM_DispPl?NAME NUM=15062&DETAIL=1 http://www.nativegardeningla.com/shrubs/perityle.html
  • 85. © Project SOUND Consider foliage/flower contrast ?? Where to place the Perityle incana Encelia californica; Viguiera parishii Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 86. We need some more fall bloomers © Project SOUND http://camissonia.blogspot.com/2010/09/treks-on-santa-rosa-plateau-august.html
  • 87. We’ve got several choices among the Sunflowers Width Early/Spring Summer Fall 5-6 ft Grindelia camporum Hazardia/Isocoma 4-5 ft Encelia californica *Perityle incana *Perityle incana Solidago spp *Viguiera parishii Ericameria ericoides *Ericameria nauseosa Solidago spp < 3 ft filler Lasthenia spp Layia platyglossa Achillea millefolium Cirsium occidentale Grindelia hirsutula Helianthus annuus Heterotheca grandiflora Malacothrix saxatilis Pseudognaphalium canescens *Symphyotrichum chilense Achillea millefolium Pluchea odorata *Symphyotrichum chilense © Project SOUND Extra points for locally native species (in green) and adult/larval (bold)
  • 88. © Project SOUND * Rubber Rabbitbush – Ericameria nauseosa ssp. nauseosa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus) © 2003 Michael Charters
  • 89. © Project SOUND  Occurs in deserts & shrublands in much of the west  In CA, in foothills from 3,000-8,000 ft  Favors sunny, open sites including disturbed areas in chaparral, desert foothills  Has been cultivated since 1886 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysothamnus_nauseosus http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/Yellow%20Enlarged%20Photo %20Pages/chrysothamnus%20nauseosus.htm http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?Chrysothamnus+nauseosus * Rubber Rabbitbush – Ericameria nauseosa ssp. nauseosa (Chrysothamnus nauseosus)
  • 90. © Project SOUND Rabbitbush is a bush Sunflower  Size:  2-5 ft tall (usual); some populations up to 10 ft tall  2-4 ft wide  Growth form:  Most commonly a mounded sub- shrub  Many long branches from a woody base  Foliage:  Narrow, aromatic leaves  May be medium green or more blue-green  Overall has a feathery appearance  Roots: deep taproot with laterals© 2005 Christopher L. Christie
  • 91. © Project SOUND  Blooms: early fall - usually Aug-Sept. in western L.A. Co.  Flowers:  Small & golden yellow  In dense clusters – either flat or more pyramidal  Extremely showy  Attract tons of weird & wonderful insects  Seeds:  Fluffy appendages like Goldenbush/Mock Heather  Wind disbursed  Must germinate that fall – do not persist in seed bank © 2003 Michael Charters http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com/Yellow%20Enlarged%20Photo%20Pages/chrysothamnus%20nauseosus.htm Flowers are like Goldenbush
  • 92. © Project SOUND Easy to grow, reliable  Soils:  Texture: just about any  pH: just about any, incl. alkali  Light: full sun  Water:  Winter: needs good winter/ spring rains; supplement in dry years  Summer: looks best with occasional water – Zones 1-2 or 2 are fine.  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils. But light fertilizer probably wouldn’t hurt it.  Other: prune back heavily after flowering – late fall
  • 93. © Project SOUND Garden uses for Rabbitbush  In a habitat garden – a real winner  For fall color  As a tough plant for commercial plantings, parking strips, etc.  As an informal hedge  Good choice for erosion control  As a smaller substitute for the Goldenbushes http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/chrysothamnus-nauseosus http://bugguide.net/node/view/40653/bgimage
  • 94. © Project SOUND We’re out of room for shrubs Ericameria nauseosa; Perityle incana Encelia californica; Viguiera parishii Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 95. Need some ‘fillers’ that increase habitat value Adult food (nectar)  Sunflowers  Cirsium occidentale  Grindelia hirsutula  Helianthus annuus  Heterotheca grandiflora  Malacothrix saxatilis  Solidago species  *Symphyotrichum chilense  Buckwheats  Several annual species Larval food  Sunflowers  Cirsium occidentale (Painted Lady)  Pseudognaphalium canescens (Ladies)  Mallows  *Sphaeralcea ambigua © Project SOUND
  • 96. © Project SOUND Cliff Aster – Malacothrix saxatilis
  • 97. © Project SOUND Desert Mallow – Sphaeralcea ambigua
  • 98. © Project SOUND Flowers remind one of Hollyhocks  Blooms:  Spring is usual bloom season (Mar-May), following rains  May bloom off and on throughout year in garden  Flowers:  Showy mallow blooms along the stems  Color- usually ‘apricot’ (another name is Apricot Mallow), but differs with variety  Nectar & pollen attract butterflies, hummingbirds, any other insects http://farm1.static.flickr.com/149/430082786_0b30a88eee.jpg?v=0
  • 99. © Project SOUND Desert Mallow is versatile in the garden  Lovely addition to mixed beds – place appropriate for size  Excellent for water-wise garden, particularly in sandy/rocky soils; most drought-tolerant Sphaeralcea  Good choice for containers  Great on dry slopes, hot gardens; not for very foggy areas  Larval food for Checkered Skipper, Common Hairstreak http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/sphaeralcea-ambigua http://www.bridgerlandaudubon.org/wildaboututah/090407xeri-garden.htm
  • 100. © Project SOUND Cultivar ‘Louis Hamilton’ Nice habitat plant – and accent color for spring/summer http://www.calflora.net/losangelesarboretum/whatsbloomingmar07E.html
  • 101. © Project SOUND Can we fit in any more? Malacothrix saxatilis; Sphaeralcea ambigua Ericameria nauseosa; Perityle incana Encelia californica; Viguiera parishii Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 102. Smaller perennial ‘fillers’ for habitat value Adult food (nectar)  Annual wildflowers  Tidytips  Goldfields  Globe gilia  Cirsium occidentale (thistle)  Sub-shrubs/perennials  Achillea millefolium (Yarrow)  Asclepias spp (Milkweeds)  Eriogonum grande var. rubescens  Lobelia dunnii var. serrata  Garden herbs/vegetables  Garlic Chives Larval food  Annual wildflowers  Lupinus succulentus (Painted Lady, West Coast Lady, Common Sulfur)  Cirsium occidentale (Painted Lady)  Sub-shrubs/perennials  Asclepias spp. (Monarch; Queen)  Garden herbs/vegetables  Parsley (Anise Swallowtail)  Borage (Painted Lady) © Project SOUND
  • 103. Narrow-leaf Milkweed - Asclepias fascicularis
  • 104. © Project SOUND Island Buckwheat – Eriogonum grande var. rubescens
  • 105. © Project SOUND Island Buckwheat – Eriogonum grande  Channel Island endemic:  var. grande (Island Buckwheat)  Channel Islands; Santa Cruz, Anacapa, Santa Catalina, San Clemente Islands  Bluffs and cliffs, coastal sage scrub and chaparral  var. rubescens (Red Buckwheat; San Miguel Island Buckwheat )  n Channel Islands; San Miguel, Santa Cruz, and Santa Rosa islands  Cliffs and bluffs, coastal grassland and scrub communities  AKA: Eriogonum grande ssp. rubescens; Eriogonum grande var. dunklei; Eriogonum latifolium var. rubescens; Eriogonum rubescens http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi- bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?5936,5994,6063,6 064 var. rubescens var. grande
  • 106. © Project SOUND Special features of Red Buckwheat  Size:  1-2 ft tall  2-4 ft wide  Growth form:  Low-growing, dense mounded form  Spreads slowly  Relatively short-lived – 3-5 years – but re-seeds  Foliage:  Neat, spoon-shaped leaves in rosettes; medium-large for buckwheat  Attractive bright to gray-green with wooly white backs
  • 107. © Project SOUND Red buckwheat: one of the showiest!  Blooms:  Primarily in summer  Any time from May to Aug – depends a bit on moisture  Flowers:  On stalks 2-3 ft tall  Color range from medium to dark pink; one of showiest CA natives  All the insects love it – good pollen and nectar source!!!  Seeds:  Attracts seed-eating birds  Re-seeds well; naturalizes  Hybridizes with other buckwheats  Vegetative reproduction: mound slowly increases in size
  • 108. © Project SOUND Plant Requirements  Soils:  Texture: best in well-drained soils; fine in dryish clay  pH: any local including alkali  Light:  Full sun near coast  May appreciate afternoon shade in hot gardens  Water:  Winter: needs normal amount  Summer: little needed – Water Zone 1-2 probably best; can kill with too much in clay  Fertilizer: none; likes poor soils  Other: thin organic mulch, if any http://santacruz.nrs.ucsb.edu/natural-resources/endemic-vascular- plants/red-buckwheat
  • 109. © Project SOUND Garden uses for Red Buckwheat  As an unusual accent plant  Super as a pot plant  Lovely massed; ground cover  Makes a pretty smaller border plant  For a ‘silver’ (moonlight) garden  In a habitat/pollinator garden  In narrow beds & planters  Pair with dudleyas, salvias, yarrow, Catalina Silverlace, larger buckwheats
  • 110. © Project SOUND Management of smaller perennial Buckwheats  In general, need very little care, as long as they are given proper soils and watering  Prune lightly in fall to stimulate next season’s growth, but avoid cutting deep into woody material
  • 111. © Project SOUND *Dunn’s Lobelia – Lobelia dunnii var. serrata http://www.laspilitas.com/plants/397.htm
  • 112. © Project SOUND *Dunn’s Lobelia – Lobelia dunnii var. serrata  CA endemic; also in N. Baja  Found in Coastal and Transverse ranges; locally in Santa Monica and San Gabriel Mountains  Found in mossy seeps, cliffs and rocky stream banks  Moist canyons below 4500 ft, coastal sage scrub, chaparral http://ucjeps.berkeley.edu/cgi-bin/get_JM_treatment.pl?Lobelia+dunnii+var.+serrata
  • 113. © Project SOUND Characteristics of Dunn’s (Blue) Lobelia  Size:  to 1 ft tall  2+ ft wide; spreading  Growth form:  Herbaceous perennial  Winter dormant; usually dies back entirely  Stems semi-woody; reclining  Foliage:  Light green  Small leaves http://www.calflora.net/bloomingplants/dunnslobelia.html
  • 114. © Project SOUND Flowers are fantastic  Blooms: summer; usually July-Aug. in S. Bay; may last into Sept.  Flowers:  Lobelia-shaped  Bright blue to lavender-blue  1 inch size  On upright spike; open sequentially  Long-blooming – at least 1 month with some water  Seeds: many little seeds; self-sows if happy  Vegetative reproduction: can be divided http://www.laspilitas.com/plants/397.htm
  • 115. © Project SOUND Dunn’s Lobelia needs moist conditions for optimal bloom…  Soils:  Texture: any; prefers soil heavy in organics (leaf mulch)  pH: 6.0-8.0  Light:  Full sun only in coolest gardens  Best flowering (and flower color) in partial or filtered shade. Fine under trees  Water:  Winter: tolerates winter flooding  Summer: like a moist soil; Zone 2-3 to 3, although quite drought tolerant  Fertilizer: use a leaf mulch  Other: quite problem-free© 1999 John Game
  • 116. © Project SOUND Garden uses for Blue Lobelia  In the butterfly garden – nectar is irresistible for many butterflies  Nice addition to bog garden, pond edge - even in shallow water ; Lovely with Juncus, Mimulus, Goldenrods  Late season color for gardens, hanging baskets, patio pots, window boxes, planters  Shady-moist ground cover; fine textured http://www.laspilitas.com/plants/397.htm
  • 117. © Project SOUND http://www.laspilitas.com/nature-of-california/plants/lobelia-dunnii-serrata We’ll have to put the Dunn’s Lobelia in the moist shade under the apple tree
  • 118. © Project SOUND Our shrubs & perennials are in place Eriogonum grande var. rubescens; annuals Malacothrix saxatilis; Sphaeralcea ambigua Ericameria nauseosa; Perityle incana Encelia californica; Viguiera parishii Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 119. Smaller ‘fillers’ that increase habitat value Adult food (nectar)  Annual wildflowers  Tidytips  Goldfields  Phacelia spp  Globe gilia  Sub-shrubs/perennials  Achillea millefolium  Asclepias spp (Milkweeds)  Eriogonum grande var. rubescens  Lobelia dunnii var. serrata  Garden herbs/vegetables  Garlic Chives Larval food  Annual wildflowers  Lupinus succulentus (Painted Lady, West Coast Lady, Common Sulfur)  Cirsium occidentale (Painted Lady)  Sub-shrubs/perennials  Asclepias spp. (Monarch; Queen)  Garden herbs/vegetables  Parsley (Anise Swallowtail)  Borage (Painted Lady) © Project SOUND
  • 120. Annual wildflowers © Project SOUND Tidy-tips Goldfields Globe gilia Arroyo lupine
  • 121. © Project SOUND White Everlasting – Pseudognaphalium canescens
  • 122. © Project SOUND White Everlasting is great for an ‘Evening Garden’  Most people include this species as a butterfly plant – larval food for American Lady  Excellent choice for an ‘Evening Garden’ – looks nice during the day but very striking in low-light situations  Makes an attractive pot plant; place where you can watch the butterflies American Lady larva http://www.theodorepayne.org/plants/ plants_for_butterflies.htm
  • 123. © Project SOUND Cobwebby Thistle – Cirsium occidentale http://www.ubcbotanicalgarden.org/potd/2006/01/cirsium_occidentale_var_occidentale.php
  • 124. © Project SOUND Garden uses for Cobwebby Thistle  As an attractive pot plant  In the annual wildflower garden, mixed beds  In the vegetable garden; stem may be eaten raw or cooked  Great addition to the wildlife garden: butterflies, bees, birds, hummingbirds, and more! Remember: plant where the spiny leaves won’t be a hazard
  • 125. © Project SOUND Whew! I think we’re almost there Eriogonum grande var. rubescens; annuals Malacothrix saxatilis; Sphaeralcea ambigua Ericameria nauseosa; Perityle incana Encelia californica; Viguiera parishii Salvias: S. leucophylla (2); S. clevelandii (3) Eriogonum fasciculatum (?1) Eriogonum cinerium Lavender Thyme
  • 126. 2014: Bringing Nature Home - Lessons from Gardening Traditions Worldwide © Project SOUND
  • 127. Final nectar plant list: impressive Spring Summer Fall Trees/Large shrub Amorpha californica Rhamnus illicifolia Smaller shrub (4-6 ft) Encelia californica Perityle incana Salvia leucophylla Eriogonum cinereum Eriogonum fasciculatum Perityle incana Salvia clevelandii Viguiera parishii Eriogonum cinereum Ericameria nauseosa Viguiera parishii Other (fillers) Annual wildflowers Garlic Chives Gilia capitata Sphaeralcia ambigua Asclepias fascicularis Cirsium occidentalis Eriogonum grande rubescens Gilia capitata Lavender Lobelia dunnii var. serrata Malacothrix saxatilis Thyme Sphaeralcia ambigua © Project SOUND
  • 128. We’ve provided larval food for ~ 20 species  Pale Swallowtail (Rhamnus illicifolia)  Anise Swallowtail (Parsley)  California Dogface (Amorpha californica)  Cabbage White (vegetable garden)  Common Checkered White (vegetable garden)  Gray Hairstreak (Amorpha spp.; Eriogonums ; Lupinus)  Marine Blue (Amorpha spp.; Eriogonum spp.; Lupinus)  Acmon Blue (Eriogonum spp.; Lupinus)  Mormon & Dusky Metalmarks (Encelia california; Eriogonum fasciculatum)  Painted & American Ladies (Cirsium occidentalis; Lupinus succulentus ; Pseudognaphalium spp.)  West Coast Lady (Lupinus succulentus; Borage)  Monarch & Queen (Asclepias spp.)  Skippers (grass) © Project SOUND
  • 129. © Project SOUND https://www.facebook.com/UCRBGfriends UCR Botanic garden – Butterfly Garden
  • 130. We’ve met our goals  Relaxed, natural appearance  Small size  Native plants  Butterflies & other pollinators visit  Some color – but natural – not like Disneyland  Sunny  Easy access  Seating that makes it easy to enjoy the plants/pollinators  A Life-friendly garden © Project SOUND
  • 131. Next month we’ll convert a yard into ‘Hummingbird Heaven’ © Project SOUND