Design Process and Goal  Setting for FSAE This presentation will discuss the importance of setting appropriate goals for t...
Design Levels <ul><li>Before discussing goals, we must establish some background about design </li></ul><ul><li>There are ...
Level 1:Component Design <ul><li>Level 1 is designing individual components, evaluating how to make a single part better. ...
Level 1, Explained <ul><li>“ Choose the right bolt” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At this level, we’re looking to optimize each co...
Level 2: Vehicle Integration <ul><li>Level 2 is designing how the various components will fit together into subsystems, an...
Level 2, Explained <ul><li>At this level, we’re interested in how one component can benefit others </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E...
Level 2, Example <ul><li>Objective: Maximize tire performance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The tires perform best when hot, so he...
Level 3: Competition Level <ul><li>Competition covers diverse parameters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Racing” (vehicle dynamics...
Level 3, Explained <ul><li>In order to maximize points: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Score points in all events </li></ul></ul><u...
Level 3, Further Thinking <ul><li>A car with more power is faster, but likely heavier to handle the power </li></ul><ul><u...
Level 3, Further Thinking <ul><li>The car which has less power, but weighs less has an advantage for the majority of the p...
Purpose of Goals <ul><li>Establish team direction and focus </li></ul><ul><li>Car is made up of thousands of decisions </l...
Setting Team Goals <ul><li>Team goals should trickle down from level 3 back to level 1 </li></ul>
Setting Team Goals <ul><li>Max points = compete in each event </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overarching goal is to complete every ...
Setting Team Goals <ul><ul><li>As seen in the power vs. weight example, more power helps a small part of the competition. ...
Setting Detail Goals <ul><ul><li>The plan for accomplishing the higher level goals fall to the lower levels </li></ul></ul...
Food Example <ul><li>Cooking a meal can be a metaphor for designing the car for the competition. In cooking a meal, a chef...
Food Example, continued <ul><li>However, if the chef lacks direction, and instead mashes the steak and sears the potatoes,...
Food Example, explained <ul><li>It doesn’t particularly matter that you made steak and potatoes. It doesn’t even matter mu...
Food Example, explained <ul><li>The team whose car best takes advantage of the available ingredients, and makes the most o...
Conclusion <ul><li>In order to design a successful race car for the Formula SAE competition, the team should evaluate what...
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Team goals

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Team goals

  1. 2. Design Process and Goal Setting for FSAE This presentation will discuss the importance of setting appropriate goals for the competition, and how to go about accomplishing them.
  2. 3. Design Levels <ul><li>Before discussing goals, we must establish some background about design </li></ul><ul><li>There are three levels of design on which the best teams operate </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Level 1: Component Design </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level 2: Vehicle Integration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level 3:Competition Package Integration </li></ul></ul>
  3. 4. Level 1:Component Design <ul><li>Level 1 is designing individual components, evaluating how to make a single part better. </li></ul><ul><li>This can include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Finite Element Analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Component choice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stress, bending, or vibrational analysis </li></ul></ul><ul><li>“ Choose the right bolt” </li></ul>
  4. 5. Level 1, Explained <ul><li>“ Choose the right bolt” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At this level, we’re looking to optimize each component for its specific purpose. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How strong does the bolt need to be? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How long should the shank/ threads be? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What type of retention does it require? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Could it be lighter? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Picking the bolt that meets all these criteria is effective Level 1 design. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 6. Level 2: Vehicle Integration <ul><li>Level 2 is designing how the various components will fit together into subsystems, and how the subsystems attach to the car </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How do the components interface with each other? Well? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How do we design the suspension to work with our differential choice? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How to mount the engine for easy service? </li></ul></ul>
  6. 7. Level 2, Explained <ul><li>At this level, we’re interested in how one component can benefit others </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Effective level 2 design is not merely bolting together well-done pieces from level 1. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Given the vehicle as a total system, how do the subsystems make the car better? </li></ul></ul>
  7. 8. Level 2, Example <ul><li>Objective: Maximize tire performance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The tires perform best when hot, so heat the tires quickly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A spool differential heats up tires quickly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A spool requires lifting a wheel slightly to reduce under steer. What suspension geometry accomplishes that? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What torque curve suits the power delivery needs for that given set-up? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Good level 2 design balances all these issues </li></ul>
  8. 9. Level 3: Competition Level <ul><li>Competition covers diverse parameters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Racing” (vehicle dynamics, lap times) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Non-racing” (cost, fuel economy) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Each parameter is allotted points </li></ul><ul><li>The winner is the team who designs their car to maximize the opportunity for points </li></ul>
  9. 10. Level 3, Explained <ul><li>In order to maximize points: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Score points in all events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Dynamic events = 700/1000 points </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Static events = 300/1000 points </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Perform better than other teams in each event </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Optimize car for competition scenario </li></ul>
  10. 11. Level 3, Further Thinking <ul><li>A car with more power is faster, but likely heavier to handle the power </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Benefit for acceleration (75 pts) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Benefit for straights of autocross and endurance (~10% of 450 pts) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Detriment to fuel economy (100 pts) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Detriment to skid pad (50 pts) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Detriment to braking and cornering of autocross and endurance (~90% of 450 pts) </li></ul></ul>
  11. 12. Level 3, Further Thinking <ul><li>The car which has less power, but weighs less has an advantage for the majority of the point distribution </li></ul><ul><li>Choosing a design philosophy which maximizes the potential for points is effective level 3 design. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Purpose of Goals <ul><li>Establish team direction and focus </li></ul><ul><li>Car is made up of thousands of decisions </li></ul><ul><li>Every decision should be made in order to meet at least one of the goals, more is better </li></ul>
  13. 14. Setting Team Goals <ul><li>Team goals should trickle down from level 3 back to level 1 </li></ul>
  14. 15. Setting Team Goals <ul><li>Max points = compete in each event </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Overarching goal is to complete every event </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In order to compete in each event, the car must be reliable. More than weight, power, suspension tuning, or any other parameter (except safety) the car must run continuously for the entire competition without failure. </li></ul></ul>
  15. 16. Setting Team Goals <ul><ul><li>As seen in the power vs. weight example, more power helps a small part of the competition. Reducing weight improves performance across the board. Therefore, the strategy for lowering the car’s weight is a team goal. This goal drives vehicle parameters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Engine choice </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Suspension strategy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>After choosing high level strategy, the smaller pieces should fall into place </li></ul></ul>
  16. 17. Setting Detail Goals <ul><ul><li>The plan for accomplishing the higher level goals fall to the lower levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce “x” or increase “y” for a given part (physical parameters: weight, stiffness…) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce the compliance of the stack-up of these parts </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Increase manufacturability, reduce cost </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Improve adjustability or ease of assembly </li></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 18. Food Example <ul><li>Cooking a meal can be a metaphor for designing the car for the competition. In cooking a meal, a chef has ingredients and methods to prepare them. He can start with fine steak and quality potatoes to prepare a meal. With a goal of creating a wholesome plate of meat & potatoes, the chef has direction and a plan for maximizing the ingredients available. A trip to the grill for a sear on the steak and a mixer to mash the potatoes will deliver a successful final product. </li></ul>
  18. 19. Food Example, continued <ul><li>However, if the chef lacks direction, and instead mashes the steak and sears the potatoes, the meal is ruined. The quality of the individual ingredients doesn’t matter if they are not prepared and assembled well. </li></ul><ul><li>But how does this relate to a race car? </li></ul>
  19. 20. Food Example, explained <ul><li>It doesn’t particularly matter that you made steak and potatoes. It doesn’t even matter much if the steak is a bit overdone and the mashed potatoes have a few lumps. What does matter is why you chose to make steak and potatoes (as opposed to say, chocolate cake) and if your strategy to prepare the meal is well founded and works. Why is steak and potatoes the best dish for the competition? Why not cake? </li></ul>
  20. 21. Food Example, explained <ul><li>The team whose car best takes advantage of the available ingredients, and makes the most of them has the best chance to win. The team who sets their goals appropriately, and then accomplishes them, and understands why the processes they used are the correct ones will be the most successful in competition. </li></ul>
  21. 22. Conclusion <ul><li>In order to design a successful race car for the Formula SAE competition, the team should evaluate what dish they think would best suit the parameters of the competition as defined by the rules, and set that as the top level goal. Then they should appropriately design their ingredients to work in harmony to maximize their potential, and make the dish more suited to the palate of competition than all the other competitors. </li></ul>

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