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Thinking about placeSocial, Change and Communities        starting at the end
Thumbnail• A client (fictional)                   Task   – Motivate to change• A place (Corby)                            ...
This module is ‘soft’
Whatever is true for space and time, thismuch is true for place; we are immersed in itand could not do without it. To be a...
Space and Place• Often ‘space’ is understood as something hollow or exterior: a container  for place.• In common usage (ev...
Space and PlaceWhat begins as undifferentiated space becomes place as weget to know it better and endow it with value… The...
Sensing place   ‘There is no knowing or sensing a place except by   being in that place, and to be in place is to be in a ...
‘Just as there are no places without the bodiesthat sustain and vivify them, so there are no livedbodies without the place...
Senses of PlaceYou inhabit a spot which before you inhabit it is as indifferentto you as any spot upon the earth, & when, ...
So where are you going??   What place will you be in   (in a few months time)?Social, change & communities
Experiential               11
Whole Module• We start with SELF• Then we look at OTHER• Then we look at the intersection of SELF and  OTHER• SELF/OTHER• ...
Starting with YOU• Being, working, relating and learning within  the context of uncertainty• Uncertainty as threat• Uncert...
Motivation• The pressure to change, continuous  improvement• Both as a student and your (future) clients.• Intrinsic v ext...
Self as social- the SELF:OTHER intersection• Herbert Mead- I/Self: generalised OTHER• Identity work: the effort in maintai...
Graffiti – constructing the OTHER• Our identity informed in  relation to OTHERNESS• NOT ME• Others are ‘constructed’ by  w...
Who am I, Sam?• I am not who I think I am  I am not who you think I am  I am who I think you think that I am• its not "You...
Community        and MeAnd my interviewee….
A client- how to change behaviour?• i.e. ASBO• Options  – criminalisation  – fine parents  – create a community centre   E...
If one client is difficult enough?• What about entire communities?• What about problem estates?• What about Kingswood in C...
All of social & community work  Is now subject to the wider policy of     ‘Sustainable Communities’  Or ‘Big Society’Susta...
Response to a ProblemToo many urban neighborhoods have been blighted by oversized housing projectsand centralized redevelo...
Living with complexity   Chapter 1 of Dialogue Mapping: Building Shared Understanding         of Wicked Problems, by Jeff ...
Wicked Problems1.  There is no definite formulation of a wicked problem.2.  Wicked problems have no stopping rules.3.  Sol...
Tame ProblemsChapter 1 of Dialogue Mapping: Building Shared Understanding      of Wicked Problems, by Jeff Conklin, Ph.D.,...
BUT, change?   Physical infrastructure is easyCommunity infrastructure is neglected
Exploring the Community                   Infrastructure•   Community profile- rational•   Rich picture- lived experience ...
Utopian Corby     Or will you     visit THIS     Corby?
Carnival (Bakhtin)                                  Hetero                                  glossiaMultiplicity of Languag...
Descriptor of Academic Level 6•   a systematic understanding of key aspects of their field of study,•   including acquisit...
Assessing• Portfolio of Engagement 25%   – Runs from now, and proves your engagement with, and     reflection on the WHOLE...
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Swk3017 Thinking About Place Sept 2012

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Transcript of "Swk3017 Thinking About Place Sept 2012"

  1. 1. Thinking about placeSocial, Change and Communities starting at the end
  2. 2. Thumbnail• A client (fictional) Task – Motivate to change• A place (Corby) Theory – Major intervention• A student Epistemology – Reflexive practitioner• (Dare I say it?) An epistemology – Social constructivism
  3. 3. This module is ‘soft’
  4. 4. Whatever is true for space and time, thismuch is true for place; we are immersed in itand could not do without it. To be at all – toexist in any way – is to be somewhere, and tobe somewhere is to be in some kind of placeEdward Casey, The Fate of Place: A Philosophical History (Berkeley:University of California Press, 1998), p. ix
  5. 5. Space and Place• Often ‘space’ is understood as something hollow or exterior: a container for place.• In common usage (even by many geographers), ‘spaces’ are transformed into ‘places’ by naming *claiming+ and filling them. In this sense space and place are treated as a duality, even as opposites.• But this is overly simplistic.• Rather than think of space as hollow or as an absence, we might understand ‘space’ as a broader and more abstract concept than ‘place’.• Yi Fu Tuan (1974) describes space as ‘movement’ and place as ‘pause’.• Space as possibility, openness, the sublime, the ‘beyond’• Some geographers (e.g., Henri Lefebvre 1974) use ‘space’ where others might use ‘place’ 5
  6. 6. Space and PlaceWhat begins as undifferentiated space becomes place as weget to know it better and endow it with value… The ideas‘space’ and ‘place’ require each other for definition. From thesecurity and stability of place we are aware of the openness,freedom, and threat of space, and vice-versa. Furthermore, ifwe think of space as that which allows movement then placeis pause; each pause in movement makes it possible forlocation to be transformed into place.Tuan, Space and Place: The Perspective of Experience (Minneapolis:University of Minnesota Press, 2003), p. 6
  7. 7. Sensing place ‘There is no knowing or sensing a place except by being in that place, and to be in place is to be in a position to perceive it.’ Casey, ‘How to get from Space to Place, p. 18‘How to get from Space to Place in a Fairly Short Stretch ofTime’, in Senses of Place, ed. by Steven Feld & Keith H.Basso (Santa Fe: School of American Research,1996)Cf your ‘community profiles’ from last year- did you manage to convey ‘place’?
  8. 8. ‘Just as there are no places without the bodiesthat sustain and vivify them, so there are no livedbodies without the places they inhabit andtraverse.’Casey,‘How to get from Space to Place’, p. 25
  9. 9. Senses of PlaceYou inhabit a spot which before you inhabit it is as indifferentto you as any spot upon the earth, & when, persuaded bysome necessity you think to leave it, you leave it not, - it clingsto you & with memories of things which in your experience ofthem gave no such promise, revenges your desertion.Percy Bysshe Shelley, from The Letters of Percy Bysshe Shelley, ed.Frederick L. Jones, 2 Vols (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1964), II, p. 6.
  10. 10. So where are you going?? What place will you be in (in a few months time)?Social, change & communities
  11. 11. Experiential 11
  12. 12. Whole Module• We start with SELF• Then we look at OTHER• Then we look at the intersection of SELF and OTHER• SELF/OTHER• COMMUNITY and PLACE
  13. 13. Starting with YOU• Being, working, relating and learning within the context of uncertainty• Uncertainty as threat• Uncertainty as opportunity• Resilience• “Personal Construct Psychology-inc. ‘we can challenge certain myths about ourselves.’• Being true to the person not the system
  14. 14. Motivation• The pressure to change, continuous improvement• Both as a student and your (future) clients.• Intrinsic v extrinsic motivation• Your role to facilitate the interplay• Ambivalence Miller and Rollnick {2002} Preparing People for Change.
  15. 15. Self as social- the SELF:OTHER intersection• Herbert Mead- I/Self: generalised OTHER• Identity work: the effort in maintaining identity• Constructing, deconstructing, reconstructing• MANIPULATING identity• Frantz Fanon-race and otherness, white man in black skin• Edward Said, Orientalism- imagining geographies
  16. 16. Graffiti – constructing the OTHER• Our identity informed in relation to OTHERNESS• NOT ME• Others are ‘constructed’ by what I don’t like in myself – scapegoat• How do I ‘construct’ my clients? •Graffiti does not make a• Am I being true to their own place worse, it highlights places that have already identities? been neglected •Dialectic of claiming ownership in the context of ownership being abrogated
  17. 17. Who am I, Sam?• I am not who I think I am I am not who you think I am I am who I think you think that I am• its not "You are what you eat," its "You eat what you think you are."• WHO ARE YOU? If you are to ‘fix’ other people, is your identity(ies) stable?
  18. 18. Community and MeAnd my interviewee….
  19. 19. A client- how to change behaviour?• i.e. ASBO• Options – criminalisation – fine parents – create a community centre Express Empathy – give him a job/skills Support Self-Efficacy Roll with Resistance Develop Discrepancy• All external motivators• What about the internal motivation?
  20. 20. If one client is difficult enough?• What about entire communities?• What about problem estates?• What about Kingswood in Corby? – http://news.bbc.co.uk/player/nol/newsid_445000 0/newsid_4457200/4457238.stm?bw=bb&mp=w m&news=1&bbcws=1• Or Shadsworth Estate in Blackburn? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABp3rCllJjM& feature=related
  21. 21. All of social & community work Is now subject to the wider policy of ‘Sustainable Communities’ Or ‘Big Society’Sustainable communities are placeswhere people want to live and work,now and in the future.They meet the diverse needs of existingand future residents, are sensitive totheir environment, and contribute to ahigh quality of life.They are safe and inclusive, wellplanned, built and run, and offerequality of opportunity and goodservices for all.
  22. 22. Response to a ProblemToo many urban neighborhoods have been blighted by oversized housing projectsand centralized redevelopment schemes. You will visit Corby
  23. 23. Living with complexity Chapter 1 of Dialogue Mapping: Building Shared Understanding of Wicked Problems, by Jeff Conklin, Ph.D., Wiley, October 2006.
  24. 24. Wicked Problems1. There is no definite formulation of a wicked problem.2. Wicked problems have no stopping rules.3. Solutions to wicked problems are not true-or-false, but better or worse.4. There is no immediate and no ultimate test of a solution to a wicked problem.5. Every solution to a wicked problem is a "one-shot operation"; because there is no opportunity to learn by trial-and-error, every attempt counts significantly.6. Wicked problems do not have an enumerable (or an exhaustively describable) set of potential solutions, nor is there a well-described set of permissible operations that may be incorporated into the plan.7. Every wicked problem is essentially unique.8. Every wicked problem can be considered to be a symptom of another [wicked] problem.9. The causes of a wicked problem can be explained in numerous ways. The choice of explanation determines the nature of the problems resolution.10. [With wicked problems,] the planner has no right to be wrong.
  25. 25. Tame ProblemsChapter 1 of Dialogue Mapping: Building Shared Understanding of Wicked Problems, by Jeff Conklin, Ph.D., Wiley, October 2006.
  26. 26. BUT, change? Physical infrastructure is easyCommunity infrastructure is neglected
  27. 27. Exploring the Community Infrastructure• Community profile- rational• Rich picture- lived experience & gaps• Express Empathy • Contributes to change for a peaceful, just and sustainable future. •Develops anti-discriminatory analyses that• Support Self-Efficacy reach from local tostories are political the ways in which personal global, identifying • Builds practical local projects with people in• Roll with Resistance community to question their reality •Teaches people •Forms strategic alliances for collective action,• Develop Discrepancy local to global to its radical agenda, with social •Remains true and environmental justice at its heart •Generates theory in action, practical theory based on experience which contributes to a unity of praxis. Ledwith (2007) reclaiming the radical agenda
  28. 28. Utopian Corby Or will you visit THIS Corby?
  29. 29. Carnival (Bakhtin) Hetero glossiaMultiplicity of Languages Multiplicity of Places
  30. 30. Descriptor of Academic Level 6• a systematic understanding of key aspects of their field of study,• including acquisition of coherent and detailed knowledge, at least some of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of defined aspects of a discipline• an ability to deploy accurately established techniques of analysis and enquiry within a discipline• conceptual understanding that enables the student:• to devise and sustain arguments, and/or to solve problems, using ideas and techniques, some of which are at the forefront of a discipline• to describe and comment upon particular aspects of current research, or equivalent advanced scholarship, in the discipline• an appreciation of the uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge• the ability to manage their own learning, and• to make use of scholarly reviews and primary sources (for example, refereed research articles and/or original materials appropriate to the discipline).• critically evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts and data (that may be incomplete), to make judgements, and to frame appropriate questions to achieve a solution - or identify a range• the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility and decision-making in complex and unpredictable contexts
  31. 31. Assessing• Portfolio of Engagement 25% – Runs from now, and proves your engagement with, and reflection on the WHOLE module• By Dec 25% Person-centred social change – A group based exercise with a (fictional) welfare resident of Corby and your attempt to motivate for change• By May- Case-study report 50% – The groups will be required to investigate a social development situation (i.e. Corby and sustainable communities) and devise a portfolio of interventions. – Each group member will then write a detailed report of the processes of investigation, describing their proposed project, providing full justification for its implementation
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