Spirit in the community
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Spirit in the community

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Exploring the possible use of the principles of motivational interviewing (or multi-logue) in community development

Exploring the possible use of the principles of motivational interviewing (or multi-logue) in community development

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  • 1. A SPIRIT IN THE COMMUNITY
    LESS WRESTLING MORE DANCING
    Ian Healy
  • 2. WITHIN AND ALONGSIDE
    Translating the spirit and principles of MI.
    The ‘expert’ as redundant
    The Community as autonomous
    Collective consciousness
    Free will
  • 3. CEA
    COLLABORATION with community
    EVOCATION what your presence evokes/inspires community to enact
    AUTONOMY community as autonomous collective
  • 4. AFFIRMING NOT RIGHTING
    As an activist your intention is to affirm positive community dynamics
    You are not there to ‘put right’ the community
    The implicit moral agenda as judgemental; denying.
  • 5. MI CORE PHILOSOPHY translated per community context
    Environmental conditions typically evoked by Community resistance
    Activist – Community relationship as collaborative and friendly
    Resolving Community ambivalence prioritised
    Activist as non prescriptive
  • 6. Community as responsible for own progress
    Activist works to assist Community in determining its own locus of effectiveness/efficacy
    Miller & Rollnick {2002} MI as:
    -client centred
    -directive
    - pro intrinsic motivation
    -exploring & resolving ambivalence
  • 7. PRINCIPLES
    Expressing Empathy
    Developing Discrepancy
    Supporting Self Efficacy
    Rolling with Resistance
  • 8. THE INQUIRING COMMUNITY
    Collaborating with the Community to enable its own curiousness about its own change process.
    Modelling empathy.
    Encouraging meaning making.
    Reflections on behaviour and its consequences.
  • 9. STAGES OF CHANGE
  • 10. MI FLOW
  • 11. IN SEARCH OF MOTIVATIONAL DIALOGUE
    MD as a conversational approach.
    Seeking to engage people in change orientation.
    Their lives and within their communities.
    A consciousness of where they are in the change journey.
    Common understanding of what will help.
  • 12. CHANGE WHEEL INTERPRETED
    Non acknowledgement of need for change-lack of community consciousness
    Growing community acknowledgement of such a need
    Conscious community commitment to change
  • 13. Community becomes active-taking responsibility for own change process
    Identifying and acting upon a focus for change-what is needed; what support for process.
    Change orientation as endemic-a focussed and collectively owned change habit
  • 14. RISK
    Relapse can happen at any time
    Exit at any Stage
    Political infighting
    Elitism
    Resistance
  • 15. RETENTION OF COMMUNITY CENTREDNESS
    What is the Community’s agenda for change?
    How was it arrived at?
    The centrality of non directedness.
    Community worker as humble practitioner not seeking to prioritise a discreet agenda.
  • 16. FOR GENUINE CHANGE
    Communities will genuinely change when they are ready and willing.
    Pushing them provokes resistance and dilution of the effectiveness of the change process.
    Interventions to be aimed at community ownership of the process.
  • 17. INTERVENING PURPOSEFULLY
    Skills and dispositions appropriate to the Stage of Change
    How are you enabling the Community to own its own change process?
    How might you be corrupting this process?
    How is the dialogue enabling clarity?
  • 18. REMEMBER YOUR OARS
    Open Ended Questions
    Affirmations
    Reflective Listening
    Summaries
  • 19. TRUST BUILDING
    Constructing a relationship founded on TRUST & ACCEPTANCE {assignment intervention-check}
    Tuning into the Community’s Wisdom {assignment intervention-check}
    Establishing initial Priorities {assignment intervention-check}
  • 20. THE OPEN ENDED PRACTITIONER
    How can we help you with……?
    What can you tell us that will enable us to understand what you need?
    What is it that you want to change?
    What do you want to be different?
    Can you tell us about the pluses of living around here?
    What about the negatives?
    What previous attempts at improvements have your tried/
    Where might you be prepared to start?
  • 21. AFFIRMATIONS
    ‘It’s really useful that you are prepared to meet with us today.’
    ‘That feels like a really constructive suggestion to…..’
    ‘As a team we are feeling very positive at the ideas that you are coming up with to develop this area.’
  • 22. REFLECTIONS AND SUMMARIES
    ‘ We are getting a strong sense that you would like to see quite a change in the facilities here. All of us feel enthusiastic in wanting to work with you. In essence you appear to be suggesting that……’
    Sometimes briefly repeating what’s been said by the Community members
    Summarising
    Paraphrasing
    Reflecting feeling
  • 23. CHANGE ORIENTATION
    Pay particular attention to Community responses suggesting a desire for change.
    Include this emphasis in summaries etc
  • 24. SUGGESTIONS OF THE NEED FOR CHANGE
    ‘We know that if we don’t do something about how the area has become it will be too late soon.’
    ‘If we don’t try to do something ourselves sooner or later they will take the Community Centre off us.’
    ‘At long last there are enough of us who want to make a difference but we are not sure what.’
  • 25. ‘We’ve had enough and feel sure that we can get something done if you are prepared to help.’
    ‘We’ve been talking about this for ages and some days we really feel that we can get started. Other days it all seems a bit too much ; it’s as if the area will always be for losers.’
  • 26. ARE YOU BEING HARND?
    HUMBLE
    AUTHENTIC
    RESPECTFUL
    NON-DIRECTIVE
    How are you doing this; how do you know?
  • 27. INSIDER KNOWLEDGE
    Communities are experts in their own environments!
    They live there!
    Understand.
    Ignore/Avoid.
  • 28. COMMUNITY DIALECTIC
    Certainties .v. Uncertainties
    Aspirations .v. Fears
    Ambivalence-tensions, contradictions
    Degrees of willingness to contemplate
    To change.
  • 29. A PART OF ME IS NOT MD!
    Moral agenda…..maybe confrontational
    Telling
    Urging
    Persuading
    Unsolicited advice
  • 30. REFLEXIVITY IN THE COMMUNITY
    What’s at the root of my/our involvement?
    What is my/our intrinsic motivation in working with this community; sub group?
    Am I being solicitous?
    What function does my concern serve?
  • 31. Is the Community ready and willing to ask itself?
    How do we need to change if we want to enjoy an improved environment?
    What are we looking to improve?
    Why? How? By when?
    With what resources? Within what {whose} boundaries?
  • 32. QUESTIONS FOR OURSELVES
    What assumptions am I/we making?
    How am I challenging my own {colleagues’} assumptions?
    What are my/our expectations of the Community?
    How am I/we sharing them/to what extent?
    Degree of transparency?
  • 33. WHEN A COMMUNITY GETS STUCK
    Resistance………denial
    Problem what problem?
    Change? What’s the point?
    ‘You’ll never change people around here….’
    ‘It’s just the way we are…..’
  • 34. ‘We want things to be the way they used to be….’
    ‘In our day none of this would have been allowed.’
    ‘What’s the point in you lot gettin’ involved? They’ll only go an’ mess it up again.’
    ‘We know you mean well an’ all that but we don’t share your god and in any case what would people think?’