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Measuring Return on Social Investment - Presentation at @measurementconf 15th Feb 2012

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A presentation given to MeasurementConf at NCIRL, Dublin. ...

A presentation given to MeasurementConf at NCIRL, Dublin.

Including information from "Measuring Return on Social Investment" by BBDO Proximity.

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  • Hello! I'm Dena. \n\nI'm a digital strategist. Which basically means that I help clients to best utilise digital to achieve their business goals\n\nAt least that's the plan anyway. \n\nToday I'm going to talk to you about Return on Social Investment - hopefully helping you get a better understanding of what that is and how to go about it.\n
  • Tracking return on investment for social media, is by no means easy. But tracking return on investment for any element of our marketing campaigns isn't easy either. \n\nJohn Wanamaker made the quote you can see on screen about advertising, and it is still readily banded about meeting rooms when it comes to analysis time. And it's coming up 100 years old.\n\nThe difference between measuring the ROI for our "traditional" comms activity and our social activity is that we're moving out of our comfort zones.\n\nWe understand the terms around traditional media and how to use them for form a picture about the impact that our campaigns have had. \n\nWhen we seek to analyse a campaign, we measure AS MUCH AS WE CAN!\n\nThe problem with social is that we're trying to find a really simple solution. A single thing that we can hang our successes or failures on. \n\nThat isn't the case for most other media, and it isn't the case for social media\n
  • **Question time**\nHands up anyone that has recently run a TV campaign? \n- Keep your hand raised if you only measured the TVRs and OTS?\n\nOK. Hands up anyone that's recently run a display campaign?\n- Keep your hand up if you only measured impressions? \n\nWe’re measuring lots of things for our traditional marcomms, but in social media we seem to be stuck looking at the same two things\n\nSo, hands up everyone who's had a social media brief with they key objective to "get more likes and followers"?\n- We've all been there. Reach is great. Bigger is absolutely better. But on its own "so what?!"\n\nReach isn't necessarily the people that are listening. But more of that in a short while.\n
  • Final question, hands up who's had a social media brief that has had "generate buzz or talkability" as an objective?\n\nWe've all been there. \n
  • But what is it? Getting loads of people to talk about your brand? \n\nOK. Great.\n\nSo, you run some social media activity and you get 100,000 mentions of your brand in a week. ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND.\n\nIs that a good thing? We'd probably say that it was fantastic!\n\nYet what if 93,000 of those mentions are taking the piss out of your campaign and of your brand/product? Is that good? \n
  • Obviously, unless you're this guy you probably think that would be a disaster.\n\nYet, if your metric is just to "get loads of people to talk about us" - i.e. "talkability", then one can arguably say that you've achieved your goal. You got people to talk about you. They’re just not saying what you hoped they would.\n\nThis is a flawed metric. Yet as an industry we're stuck chasing it; and then struggling to justify what it is that social media is doing for our brands. When really we're after word of mouth and advocacy.\n
  • When a culture is changing so fast that it starts to feel foreign to your own, you go into culture shock. \n\nAlso known as, "future shock". The title of this very well-known and influential book that introduced the phenomenon back in 1970. \n\nWe, as an industry are suffering from "future shock". \n\nHow many people here watch Mad Men? We've all noticed that the only real difference between ad agencies and clients then and now is that we're all sitting in front of computer screens. The rest of the industry remains largely the same. Save for the boozing and smoking - the fun police killed that a while ago.\n\nWhy have we struggled to evolve? Well, probably because nobody's ever actually died from exposure to inefficient marketing\n\nThis quote is great - it sums up exactly what’s happening when consumers go online, especially in social media. \n\nBut it’s not a quote from a marketing handbook or some social media guru. No, that's a quote from "War 2.0 Irregular Warfare in the Information Age".\n\nA quote from the US Military. \n\nUnlike ad land, they are not suffering from theory induced blindness. They see the world as it is and react accordingly. If they didn't, they'd die.\n\nIt’s not life or death, but the risks are great for businesses too\n\n
  • When a culture is changing so fast that it starts to feel foreign to your own, you go into culture shock. \n\nAlso known as, "future shock". The title of this very well-known and influential book that introduced the phenomenon back in 1970. \n\nWe, as an industry are suffering from "future shock". \n\nHow many people here watch Mad Men? We've all noticed that the only real difference between ad agencies and clients then and now is that we're all sitting in front of computer screens. The rest of the industry remains largely the same. Save for the boozing and smoking - the fun police killed that a while ago.\n\nWhy have we struggled to evolve? Well, probably because nobody's ever actually died from exposure to inefficient marketing\n\nThis quote is great - it sums up exactly what’s happening when consumers go online, especially in social media. \n\nBut it’s not a quote from a marketing handbook or some social media guru. No, that's a quote from "War 2.0 Irregular Warfare in the Information Age".\n\nA quote from the US Military. \n\nUnlike ad land, they are not suffering from theory induced blindness. They see the world as it is and react accordingly. If they didn't, they'd die.\n\nIt’s not life or death, but the risks are great for businesses too\n\n
  • \n
  • Hold your horses chaps, we’re not quite there yet!\n\nFirst we need to remember the limitations of social media. \n\nTo build an efficient social media strategy that:\n- does what we need it to do for our business;\n- we can apply genuine metrics to;\n- we can demonstrate a return on investment on\n\n…we need to accept what social can and cannot do both to and for us. \n\n
  • First of all, you don't control your brand anymore.\n\nJust ask BP. \n\nThey learned, what we should all learn from them - rather than from our own consumers - that the value of any campaign can quickly be reduced to €0 if it's not genuinely truthful.\n\nThey talked at scale about going Beyond Petroleum and then they flooded the gulf coast in oil and reaped the wrath of their customers.\n\nIf it's all words and no action. All sizzle and no sausage. People can see through that crap.\n\nAnd in the age of social media, consumers will give you exactly what they think you deserve. Make it something good!\n
  • Social media is just a tool \n\nThere's a common misunderstanding these days that you're practicing "social media marketing", when you're not. You're actually practicing "social media tick-list" marketing.\n\nDo I have a Facebook page? Tick! Do I have a Twitter account? Tick? Am I on YouTube? Tick! Does our site have a blog? Tick!\n\nIs that what your social media plans look like? If it does, then stop it. It will not work.\n\nSocial is about stories. Stories that are based on facts. Social media is just a series of tools that enable to you tell your story well.\n\nIf you can’t explain WHY you’re in a particular social media channel then question why you are there. How can you begin to figure out if something’s working for you if you don’t know what your presence is supposed to achieve?!\n
  • Th value of a fan is debatable\n\nThere will be lots of discussion today about what the value of a fan is. I can tell you absolutely, there is NO single answer to that question. \n\nAccording to Millward Brown a fan is likely to give you 4 x the share of wallet than a non-fan. According to a BrandEncounter study for Ogilvy, exposure to social media is can make a customer 7 x more likely to buy your product. According to a recent SocialCode survey, fans purchase at a rate of 7% versus 2% for non-fans. \n\nWhat's the right answer out of all of these? All of them. And none of them.\n\nFans & followers compare to what traditional advertising calls, "eyeballs", "traffic", or "reach". Basically "the audience". \n\nThey have the potential to be more valuable though - they have KNOWINGLY clicked a button that said, "I would like to hear from you". \n\nBUT, don't assume they're listening. They can JUST AS EASILY hit a mute/hide button if you start to annoy them.\n\nThe value of a fan lies in what you do with them. It's not just about gathering as many fans as you can. You should be predominantly occupied with going after and creating advocates.\n
  • But advocates are hard won\n\nGenuine word-of-mouth is (and always has been) the most powerful form of advertising. It's the only form of marketing that can make a consumer change their mind completely or even make them consider brands they wouldn't have considered otherwise.\n\nBut when do consumers start to talk actively about your product or service? When do they become advocates? When you over deliver and give a better experience than they expected. Or, when you under deliver and give them a worse experience than expected.\n\nWhat you have to do is as simple as it is hard - over deliver in order for people to start sharing positive news about you, with the people they socially engage with (online and off). Start to ask yourself, "Why will this excite my consumer? How will this surprise them? How are we over delivering?"\n
  • You’re going to need some basic maths skills.\n\nWord-of-mouth is an index of a brand's power to generate messages that influence a consumer's decision to purchase.\n\nBasically a formula - volume x impact.\n\nVolume is easy - are there few or many messages that may influence my purchase decision?\n\nImpact is slightly more complex & determined by the following factors:\n> Where: Messages shared within a closed or trusted network create more impact compared to messages shared within a large or dispersed network\n> What: if the message addresses important product or service features, it is more likely to influence consumer decisions\n> Who: is the sender a trusted person and is he/she influential?\n> Source: is the message based on one's own experience or hearsay?\n\nResearch by McKinsey showed that a high-impact recommendation is up to 50 times more likely to trigger a purchase than a low-impact recommendation\n\n\n
  • WOM is not a panacea\n\nWith all of the hype around social media over the last few years we have all felt pressure to "get social" when in reality it might not be the right thing to do.\n\nIf your product/service isn't up to par, don't rush to spend money on social media thinking it'll fix your problem - instead, go away and invest in fixing your product/service.\n\nThe best way to eradicate a bad product/service is to advertise it. Certainly true today - our empowered and cynical consumers trust anonymous peers more than they trust advertisers. Systematic negative WOM will put a stop to your business.\n\nPositive WOM however, can be equally powerful and can bring great rewards. You need to understand what kind of WOM it is that you're going to generate though\nExperiential WOM - results from consumer's direct experience with a product/service, if that experience deviates from what's expected\nConsequential WOM - occurs when consumers directly exposed to traditional marketing campaigns pass on messages about them or the brand that they're publicising\nIntentional WOM - e.g. when marketers use celebrity or big-name blogger endorsements to trigger positive WOM for product launches.\n\n
  • Social media WILL cost you\n\nIf you stay away from SM it will cost you. \n\nBut getting involved on social media will cost you as well - it may be free to set up a Facebook account but you need to invest.\n\nThere are three ways to invest in social media:\n1 Culture\n> SM is about trust and engagement. Build your company on these pillars and your 1st & best advocates will be your employees.\n\n2 Good Ideas\n> You don't have to be Coca-Cola to come up with a good idea that everyone starts talking about\n> Look at #Tweetseats from Crackbird - an independent restaurant that got great awareness (AND BUSINESS) from a simple idea.\n\n3 Data\n> No matter what your company does, you should start seeing your activities as an "information based service"\n> You have to know your customers better in order to deliver them better experiences.\n> It is these better experiences that will turn each and every one of your customers into advocates\n\n\n
  • Social media WILL cost you\n\nIf you stay away from SM it will cost you. \n\nBut getting involved on social media will cost you as well - it may be free to set up a Facebook account but you need to invest.\n\nThere are three ways to invest in social media:\n1 Culture\n> SM is about trust and engagement. Build your company on these pillars and your 1st & best advocates will be your employees.\n\n2 Good Ideas\n> You don't have to be Coca-Cola to come up with a good idea that everyone starts talking about\n> Look at #Tweetseats from Crackbird - an independent restaurant that got great awareness (AND BUSINESS) from a simple idea.\n\n3 Data\n> No matter what your company does, you should start seeing your activities as an "information based service"\n> You have to know your customers better in order to deliver them better experiences.\n> It is these better experiences that will turn each and every one of your customers into advocates\n\n\n
  • Social media WILL cost you\n\nIf you stay away from SM it will cost you. \n\nBut getting involved on social media will cost you as well - it may be free to set up a Facebook account but you need to invest.\n\nThere are three ways to invest in social media:\n1 Culture\n> SM is about trust and engagement. Build your company on these pillars and your 1st & best advocates will be your employees.\n\n2 Good Ideas\n> You don't have to be Coca-Cola to come up with a good idea that everyone starts talking about\n> Look at #Tweetseats from Crackbird - an independent restaurant that got great awareness (AND BUSINESS) from a simple idea.\n\n3 Data\n> No matter what your company does, you should start seeing your activities as an "information based service"\n> You have to know your customers better in order to deliver them better experiences.\n> It is these better experiences that will turn each and every one of your customers into advocates\n\n\n
  • FIIIIIINALLY, I hear you cry\n
  • As online marketers we know how easy it is to become overwhelmed by the number of metrics available through free web analytics software. It's easy to suffer from "measure everything" syndrome .\n\nBut just because you can measure something, it doesn't mean that you should. \n\nFocus on a small subset of metrics that align closely with clearly-defined business or campaign goals. \n\nNot all metrics will be equally relevant to all marketers. Not all metrics are equally relevant to all campaigns or social activities.\n\nThe key is this - set your goals, assess the measurement tools that you have to hand, define what you're measuring and how, and understand what the results mean.\n\nSo, what can you measure?\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • **Measuring social platform activity**\n\nWe can easily classify all available metrics into four categories:\n1. User Reach: how far and wide your messages spread\n2. Volume of participation: how many consumers interact with your social initiatives\n3. User impact: how your social efforts change consumers' actions or opinions\n4. Quality of participation: the strength and depth of consumers' interactions with your social initiatives\n\n*Reveal diagram*\n\nReach\n> Easy but imperfect\n> So easy, that it's the most used metric\n> Facebook likes, twitter followers, blog subscribers etc gives an insight into how many consumers you're reaching\n> Not everyone that follows or likes you in social media will see every post you make.\n> CTRs on the links you post - measured via traditional web analytics - can begin to tell you what portion of your social media audience are effectively reached\n\nVolume of participation\n> Tells you how engaged your consumers are\n> No. comments on a blog post, @replies you receive on Twitter, like and comments on Facebook page quantify how many consumers are interacting with your efforts\n> As marketers we have tended to fixate a little on this category, but it's not the best way to measure success for any social media objectives\n\nBoth of these metrics should be complimented with qualitative metrics, to assess the full impact of your social media investments.\n\nUser Impact\n> When measuring impact we might look for returning visitors each month or active visitors per month, as an indirect indication of user impact.\n> If Direct Response is our main objective, conversions such as subscriptions, leads or sales derived from social should be the focus\n> If you're hoping to make a brand impact, an online survey is your best option to measure the effect\n> Even better, compliment this with sentiment tracking via social listening platforms.\n\nQuality or participation\n> Really, this is a subjective metric\n> You'll know high-quality participation when you see it\n> In a support forum this means that your customers are satisfied and support call volumes drop\n> If the video/photo entries that you received in your latest UGC competition are good enough to put on your website, or even on TV, then you've succeeded.\n\nTo have a holistic view of the impact of your social activity, it is best to measure across both axes - quality vs quantity. and users vs. usage. \n\nThat means going beyond the tools that social platforms themselves offer and looking at listening tools and focus groups etc.\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • So, there's a lot there to get our heads around. \n\nBut it still only measures the first-degree of social platform(s). \n\nIt doesn't yet measure the all-encompassing impact, taking into account the reach and influence of these users. Engagement.\n\nSo, how can we measure this?\n\nWe have to put people at the centre of the two axes\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • As before, engagement measurement encompasses both quant and qual metrics\n\nFour components make up the engagement framework:\n\n1. Involvement\nThe presence of a person at various touch points.\nMetrics include website visitors, time spent per page and pages viewed\nThe main data source is web analytics\n\n2. Interaction\nThe social actions people take while present at these touch points\nMetrics include comments, reviews, ratings, uploaded photos or videos etc\nData sources include mainly social media platforms\n\n3. Intimacy\nThe affection or aversion that a person holds for a brand\nMetrics include sentiment measurement in blog posts, blog comments, discussion forums etc. \nData sources include brand monitoring services, survey responses etc\n\n4. Influence\nThe likelihood that a person is to advocate on behalf of the brand\nMetrics include Net Promoter, satisfaction ratings, forwarded content etc\nData sources include market research services, surveys, web analytics etc\n\nSource: BBDO Proximity - Measuring Return on Social Investment\n\n
  • Measurement of individual engagement is complex. It requires a set of tools\n\n1. Most fundamental tool is a central customer data repository providing a consolidated view of an individual customer or prospect's relationship with your brand\n\n2. Analytics tools work off this central database, such as web analytics to map individual research, browse and purchase behaviour.\n\nBut online isn't just about transactional behaviours\nConsumers use social channels to share feedback, content and opinions\nYou'll need more sophisticated monitoring tools to capture this these.\n\n3. Social monitoring tools help marketers understand how consumers perceive and interact with the brand so that we can answer the questions like, "What are consumers saying about us?" or "Who's influencing their peers in a positive or negative manner?"\n\n4. Finally, the often neglected but utterly invaluable customer surveys are extremely important in providing additional insight into the brand affinity and influence of customers\n\n
  • So there you go. I'm sorry that I can't tell you that measuring engagement is dead simple; it's not. \n\nYou might need to take the first steps alone, but speak to your agency partners though, and work more closely together at sharing data.\n\nSilos are the enemy of digital - in creative terms and absolutely in data and insight terms.\n\nGet started and consider the payoff for your hard work:\n
  • Deeper Insight - Get a much deeper insight into the behaviours and beliefs of your customer. This should be translated into marketing strategies that target customer segments with more relevant and persuasive messages as well, or maybe even for NPD!\n\nLearn from things you currently ignore - Social media makes it easier for customers to offer their opinion and as a result all of that data is sitting out there waiting to be mined. \n\nIdentify customers who influence others to buy - A person who contributes content, such as a product review or a video of the product in use, may be far more valuable than the average purchaser. Initiate programmes to encourage these customers to contribute more content.\n\n
  • \n
  • I can't tell you that. There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. \n\nThink about what you're trying to achieve, and what you want to say, then build your social strategy around that. But build it with results in mind - results that you can measure and track.\n\nRemember: What you don't measure, you can't improve.\n
  • I'll be around during the break but I have to shoot off at 1 o'clock as duty calls. However, if you want to pick my brains or chat to me about any of what I've just said then feel free to get in touch.\n\nAlso note that I like Tea & Cake so, er, bear that in mind.\n\nThank you.\n\n
  • I'll be around during the break but I have to shoot off at 1 o'clock as duty calls. However, if you want to pick my brains or chat to me about any of what I've just said then feel free to get in touch.\n\nAlso note that I like Tea & Cake so, er, bear that in mind.\n\nThank you.\n\n

Measuring Return on Social Investment - Presentation at @measurementconf 15th Feb 2012 Measuring Return on Social Investment - Presentation at @measurementconf 15th Feb 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • Return on Social Investment Dena Walker Digital Strategist at Irish International
  • “Half the moneyI spend onadvertising iswasted. Troubleis, I don’t knowwhich half”John Wanamaker Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wanamaker
  • Source: An Untrained Eye on Flickr
  • Source: Earthworm Jim on FlickrWhat even is that?!
  • “Once in front of a screen,be it a desktop, laptop, orincreasingly a handhelddevice, we ‘log in’ - not intoa system, but into acommunity”
  • “Once in front of a screen,be it a desktop, laptop, orincreasingly a handhelddevice, we ‘log in’ - not intoa system, but into acommunity” War 2.0, Irregular Warfare in the Information Age by Thomas Rid and Marc Hecker
  • Ok, I get it. So what the hellshould I be measuring?
  • Whoa there!You don’t get away THAT easily...
  • Source: noqontrol on Flickr
  • Source: frscspd on Flickr
  • Word of mouth equity =S volume x impact
  • Investment in culture
  • Investment in cultureInvestment in good ideas
  • Investment in cultureInvestment in good ideasInvestment in data
  • Let’s get measury!
  • Just because you can,doesn’t mean you should
  • User Reach
  • Volume ofUser Reach Participation
  • Volume ofUser Reach ParticipationUser Impact
  • Volume ofUser Reach Participation Quality ofUser Impact Participation
  • Quantity User Reach Volume of Participation How far and wide do How many user interactions my messages spread? with my social initiatives?Users Usage Social Platform What’s the strength and depth of How do my social efforts change the user interactions with my consumers’ actions or opinions? social initiaitves? Quality of User Impact Participation Quality
  • Source: Simon Verrall on Flickr
  • Quantity Involvment - the presence of a Interaction - the actions the consumer at various touchpoints consumer takes at those touchpoints (ex. online behaviour stats...) (ex. posts or uploads...)Users Usage Engagement Intimacy - the affection or aversion a Influence - the likelihood a consumer consumer holds for a brand (ex. is to avocate on behalf of your brand conversation, sentiment...) (ex. NPS...) Quality
  • Source: Selasasare on Flickr
  • What’s the payoff?
  • Gain much deeper insight into customerbehaviour and beliefsMeasure and learn from things that youcurrently ignoreIdentify consumers who influence othersto buy
  • But how do I measureMY campaign?
  • There is no “one size fits all”Design something that works for you
  • DenaWalker @curlydena denawalker@irishinternational.com
  • DenaWalker @curlydena denawalker@irishinternational.com