Crafting the Immaterial Materiality

  • 833 views
Uploaded on

CHI 2010 conference presentation on designing interactive behaviors

CHI 2010 conference presentation on designing interactive behaviors

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
833
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Thanks BJORN, WELCOME ALL, MY NAME IS FATIH K. OZENC, TODAY I AM HERE ON BEHALF OF MY TEAM AT CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY AND `I WILL BE PRESENTING OUR WORK TITLE GETTING HOLD OF THE IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY OF INTERACTIVE BEHAVIORS.
  • A QUICK OVERVIEW, I WILL INTRODUCE THE CONCEPT OF CONVERSATION WITH MATERIAL in the design process, TWO WORKSHOPS WE CONDUCTED ON UNDERSTANDING IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY, AND DESIGN IMPLICATIONS FOR SUPPORT TOOLS IN having conversation with material.
  • DESIGNERS develop a tacit knowledge BY ACTIVELY ENGAGING THEMSELVES WITH THEirMATERIAl. They do this through Learning BY DOING in a shop or studio environment.
  • I will give an example of such engagement with material from my own work. This work is part of a bigger project. In this portion of the project I have a brief to design a stage-like display that will house other design elements that will show up on the stage. To Conceive of ideas, I began working with pen and paper, sketching form possibilities. through my conversation with paper I gradually move from a conventional stage idea to a more organic one.
  • first worked with Styrofoam which is a pretty easy material to work with, I got really excited that the material responding back with dynamic flowing curves. With this excitement I got curious how it would work in a more sturdy material, When I moved to the mdf- the wood material, the material pushed me back, told me I cannot create such strong curves with such depth and material. I stepped back and thought that may be I should better lighten the curves. MDF helped me to resolve the details of how 3D would work with the curves. it was now time for moving to the plastic, and begin experimenting with how the actual housing would work and encountered another problem, the depth of the form doesn’t allow me to have a clear plastic end in the form. I again stepped back, went back to the other form factors inside the housing, pushed the other design elements and decreased the depth of the form, plastic began to respond with more clear cuts. It was a big relief, I felt I was close to a resolution
  • Through this active reflecting in and on action and being comfortable with having conversation with material, I accomplished having A RESOLVED DESIGN CONCEPT ready to go to the field and meet the end users.
  • How about interaction designers? Do they have the same breath and depth in their design process? May be they DON’T DESIGN THINGS, and THEY WORK WITH BEHAVIORS but they still work with material to compose form. previous research show that interaction designers ARE NOT COMFORTABLE WORKING WITH developing interactive Behaviors. partly because they cannot develop a healthy CONVERSATION WITH Material due to the immaterial materiality of novel controls and partly because they cannot develop a tacit knowledge with the current software tools expecting designers to implement ideas before they actually conceiving or fully refining them- showing coding instead of this image, JAVA or action script
  • MOREOVER, DESIGNERS WORKING WITH THIS software tools HAVING HARD TIME ADJUSTING THEMSELVES TO THE RAPID CHANGES IN THE SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGIES AND PROGRAMMING PLATFORMS, AND they LACK COMPETENCY TO EFFECTIVELY IMPLEMENT THEIR IDEASTHEY ENDED UP HANDING OFF STATIC SCREEN DESIGNS BEFORE THEY HAVE SUFFICIENTLY CONCEIVE AND REFINED AN IDEA, simply put they don’t know if they get the right design or get the design right, when they are handing out these screens.
  • PRIOR RESEARCH ON SKETCHING TOOLS BROUGHT DIFFERENT ASPECTS OF HOW TO DEAL WITH THIS MATERIALITY. SILK, DENIM, AND DEMAIS SUPPORTS DESIGNERS IN THE CONCEIVING PHASE, WHEREAS DESIGNER’S OUTPOST PARAMETER SPECTRUM AND DESIGN HORIZONS HELP DESIGNERS TO HAVE RICH WAYS FOR REFINEMENTOUR APPROACH BUILDS ON Previous WORK AND BRINGS A more holistic PERSPECTIVE by considering conceiving, refining and communication phases in the process, and brings a design perspective to explore more natural ways of creating tacit knowledge with the future support tools
  • WITH THIS FRAMING WE WANT TO UNDERSTAND THE NATURE OF IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY, AND HOW DESIGNERS HAVE CONVERSATION WITH SUCH MATERIAL TO CREATE A TACIT KNOWLEDGE LIKE THEIR PEERS IN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ARE DEVELOPING. FINALLY WE WANT TO DEVELOP INSIGHTS ON DESIGN OF FUTURE Support TOOLS BASED ON OUR FIRST TWO MOTIVATIONS.
  • ToPURSUE these GOALS WE CONDUCTED TWO WORKSHOPS TO envision TOOLS TO HAVE BETTER CONVERSATION WITH MATERIAL.
  • With Our FOCUS ON TOOLS and our challenge of observing people IN DESIGNING OF NOVEL CONTROLS WHICH IS NOT COMMON IN PRACTICE,, WE CHOSE PARTICIPATORY DESIGNWe structure the two workshops based on our framing of design process. So We specifically focused on the conceiving in the first, and refining and communication in the second one.
  • EACH WORKSHOP CONSISTS OF TWO DESIGN EXERCISES, FOCUSING ON THE IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY AND THE TOOLS TO ADDRESS THAT MATERIALITY. First design exercise is on designing of novel controls Second design exercise is on tools to support the previous design exercise
  • THE FIRST WORKSHOP FOCUSEDON NOVEL CONTROLS SINCE THE PROBLEM OF IMMATERIAL MATERIALITY EMERGES AND BECOMES SIGNIFICANT WHEN DESIGNERS ARE DESIGNING CONTROLS THAT DON’T exist and that HAVEN’T BEEN DEVELOPED BEFORE. WITH THIS FOCUS, WE ASSIGNED TWO ACTIVITIES, THE CONCEIVING AND DESIGN OF TOOLS TO SUPPORT CONCEIVING OF NOVEL CONTROLS. WE FOCUS THE PARTICIPANTS ARE 6 PROFESSIONAL INTERACTION DESIGNERS RECRUITED FROM LOCAL DESIGN FIRMS IN PITTSBURGH AREA. WE PAIRED THEM IN teams OF TWO
  • TOINVESTIGATE THE NOVEL CONTROLS WE CRAFTED THREE DESIGN PROJECTS WITH THE SAME CONSTRAINTS. EACH TEAM ASKED TO DESIGN NOVEL CONTROLS ADDRESSING TWO DIMENSIONS OF CONTROL.RADIO TEAM IS ASKED TO DESIGN A SCREEN BASED RADIO-CONTROL FOR A BED SPREAD SHOWER TEAM IS ASKED TO DESIGN A PROJECTED CONTROL INSIDE A SHOWER STOVE TEAM IS ASKED TO DESIGN A PROJECTRED CONTROL ON A STOVE
  • DESIGNERS EXPLORE NOVEL CONTROLS BY SITUATING THEM IN CONTEXT to understand the constraints and possibilitiesRADIO-TEAM FOR INSTANCE EXPLORES THE NOVEL CONTROLS BY ACTUALLY BODYSTORMING AND WORKING OUT POSSIBILITIES IN THE CONTEXT
  • 2. Designers used gestures to conceive of and communicate ideas.RADIO-TEAM for instance WORKS WITH GESTURES, ACTIVELY REFLECTING ON THEIR DRAWINGS USING GESTURES
  • 3. Designers were inspired by examples they recall tomotivate new designs.FOR INSTANCE SHOWER TEAM WHILE EXPLORING THE POSSIBILITY OF USING TILES AS NOVEL CONTROLS REFER BACK TO DDR GAMES AND THINK POSSIBILITIES OF A SIMILAR SOLUTION
  • Based on the takeaways from the first workshop (context, examples, gestures we moved on to second workshop. The second workshop focused on the activities of refining a novel control and communicating the refined idea to developers.Participants included four developers (2 female and 2 male) and four interaction designers (all male) from the local area who all had at least two years of professional experience. None of the participants had taken part in the previous workshop.
  • With the intersection of the findings of the first workshop and the goal of focusing on the refinement in the second workshop, we had carefully CRAFTED two design projects: a plane reservation system and a used car purchasing system.
  • The nature of projects were a little different than the first one. In these projects the focus was on the refinement, which means that we need to have a roughly ready design concepts that will allow designers to work with. With that intention We carefully prepared support materials to communicate designs with controls that needed to be refined.
  • WE ALSO wanted to include materials that matched with the activities we had observed in the first workshop. TEXTURE, MOTION, GESTURE AND INTERACTION EXAMPLES ARE THE ONES THAT WE DERIVED FROM THE FIRST WORKSHOP. WE GAVE THIS EXAMPLE FOR THE CAR-DEALER TEAM RELATED TO THE BEHAVIORS THAT THEY NEED TO DESIGN WITH TIMELINE BUBBLES
  • WE GAVE THIS INTERACTION EXAMPLE, AND ASK THEM TO THINK OF THIS WHILE DESIGNING DYNAMIC AND MULTIPLE-VIEWS OF A CAR
  • THERE IS A NEED FOR TOOLS THAT CAN SUPPORT ROUGHING OUT MOTION, AND REFINING THOSE MOTIONS BY CHANGING THEIR PROPERTIES. WHEN IT COMES TO PROPERTIES THERE IS ALSO A NEED TO DERIVE PROPERTIES FROM THE GIVEN EXAMPLES. SUCH AS ROTATION SPECS OF A BALL.
  • WE HAVE THREE GOALS AT THE BEGINNING, WE WANT TO UNDERSTAND THE IMMATERIAL MATERIAL OF SOFTWARE, AND HOW DESIGNERS HAVE CONVERSATION WITH THIS MATERIAL. AND OUR EVENTUAL GOAL IS TO DEVELOP INSIGHTS ON FUTURE SUPPORT TOOLS FOR INTERACTION DESIGNERS WORKING WITH THIS MATERIAL
  • WE FOUND FUTURE TOOLS BECOME MORE RELEVANT FOR REFINING AND COMMUNICATION PHASES IN THE DESIGN PROCESSSUCH TOOLS SHOULD ALLOW DESIGNER TO CAPTURE AND REFINE MOTION THEY SHOULD WORK WITH SCENARIO-BASED DESIGN RIGHT FROM THE BEGINNING AND ALLOW DESIGNER EXPLORE THE NOVEL CONTROLS IN CONTEXTTHEY SHOULD WORK WITH EXAMPLES. THEY SHOULD KEEP, LINK EXAMPLES THROUGH THE PROCESS AND DERIVE PROPERTIES FROM EXAMPLES IF POSSIBLETHEY SHOULD ALSO SUPPORT MULTIPLE VARIATIONS AND EASY TRANSFERRING OF VISUAL ELEMENTS AND CODE
  • Communicative artifacts supporting the dialogue and consensus building between people comingfrom different perspectives (areas of expertise)Boundary object allowing different stakeholders having continuous conversation with each other, making design a co-creative endeavor
  • I WOULD LIKE TO THANK NSF and our participants FOR THEIR SUPPORT AND CONCLUDE MY TALKBY OPENING THE SPACE FOR QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS.
  • I WOULD LIKE TO THANK NSF and our participants FOR THEIR SUPPORT AND CONCLUDE MY TALKBY OPENING THE SPACE FOR QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS.

Transcript

  • 1. Getting hold of the immaterial materiality of interactive behaviors
    Fatih K.özenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad MyersCarnegie Mellon University
  • 2. Overview
    Conversation with Material
    Workshops
    Design Implications
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 2 of 31
  • 3. Conversation with material
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 3 of 31
  • 4. Conversation with material
    Learning by doing
    Developing tacit knowledge by actively engaging in the design activity and materials
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University |4 of 31
  • 5. Conversation with material
    In conceiving of a new idea or refining the details of an existing idea,materials ‘talk back’, revealing new opportunities and challenges for designers
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 5 of 31
  • 6. Conversation with material
    In conceiving of a new idea or refining the details of an existing idea, materials ‘talk back’, revealing new opportunities and challenges for designers
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 6 of 31
  • 7. Conversation with material
    Reflection in+onaction
    By thinking about what the person is doing when she is doing it (Schön)
    Pausing to think back on what the designer has done to reframe the problem (Schön)
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 7 of 31
  • 8. Problem: conceiving of immaterial material
    Difficulty of developing tacit knowledge and conversation with material due to the immaterial materiality
    Rapid changing nature of the software platforms with the development of new technologies
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 8 of 31
  • 9. Problem: refining & communicating
    Lacking the competency to effectively implement their ideas in software
    Handing off static, annotated, screen designs before they have sufficiently refined the ideas to know this is what they want
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 9 of 31
  • 10. Support tools
    Sketching
    Silk, Denim
    DEMAIS
    K-Sketch, Sketch-flow
    Iteration
    Designer’s Outpost, Parameter Spectrum, Design Horizons, Parallel Paths
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 10 of 31
  • 11. Goal: Understanding…
    The nature of immaterial materiality
    How designers have conversation with the immaterial material
    How future tools could support conversation with material
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 11 of 31
  • 12. Workshops
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 12 of 31
  • 13. Approach: participatory design
    Participatory design
    Workers designing their own tools
    Design as conceiving, refining and communication
    Conceiving: Workshop I
    Refining and Communication: Workshop II
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 13 of 31
  • 14. Approach: participatory design
    Introduction and warm-up
    Design exercise on novel controls
    Sharing of selected concepts
    Design exercise on tools
    Discussion
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 14 of 31
  • 15. Workshop I: overview
    Focus: Novel controls
    Activity
    Conceiving of novel controls
    Design of tools to support conceiving
    ParticipantsInteraction designers
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 15 of 31
  • 16. Workshop I: projects
    Motive
    To have participants to conceive a novel control
    Projects
    Radio control in a bed
    Projected controls inside a shower
    Projected controls on a stove
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 16 of 31
  • 17. Workshop I: findings
    Context
    Gestures
    Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 17 of 31
  • 18. Workshop I: findings
    Context
    Gestures
    Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 17 of 31
  • 19. Workshop I: findings
    Context
    Gestures
    Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 19 of 31
  • 20. Workshop II: overview
    Focus
    Novel controls
    Activities
    Refining a designer’s conceived design
    Communicating refined design to a developer
    Designing tools for refinement and communication
    Participants
    Interaction designers
    Software developers
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 20 of 31
  • 21. Workshop II: projects
    Motive
    Refinement of novel controls,
    not conceiving of new ones
    Projects
    Airline flight reservation system
    Online car-dealer
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 21 of 31
  • 22. Workshop II: materials
    Interface
    Storyboard
    Motion Examples
    Interaction Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 22 of 31
  • 23. Workshop II: materials
    Interface
    Storyboard
    Motion Examples
    Interaction Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 23 of 31
  • 24. Workshop II: materials
    Interface
    Storyboard
    Motion Examples
    Interaction Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 24 of 31
  • 25. Workshop II: materials
    Interface
    Storyboard
    Motion Examples
    Interaction Examples
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 25 of 31
  • 26. Workshop II: findings
    Roughing out and refining the properties of motion
    Keeping and linking examples as inspirations and deriving properties for interactive behaviors
    Working with the underlying user scenarios
    Supporting multiple versions for iterative cycles & creativity
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 26 of 31
  • 27. Discussion
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 27 of 31
  • 28. Design Implications
    Tools for refining & communication
    Motion (capturing and refining)
    Scenario-based design
    Examples
    Storing multiple variation
    Transferring visual elements and code
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University |28of 31
  • 29. Design Implications
    Tools as Boundary objects
    Communicative artifacts supporting the dialogue and consensus building between people coming
    from different perspectives (areas of expertise)
    Boundary object allowing different stakeholders having an ongoing conversation, making design a co-creative endeavor both in refinement and communication
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University |29of 31
  • 30. Questions
    Thanks!
    kursat@cmu.edu
    www.kursatozenc.com
    Acknowledgment
    We thank the designers and developers who participated in the workshops.
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 30 of 31
  • 31. Questions
    Thanks!
    kursat@cmu.edu
    www.kursatozenc.com
    Acknowledgment
    This research was supported by the NSF under grant IIS-0757511.
    Fatih K. Ozenc, Miso Kim, John Zimmerman, Stephen Oney, Brad Myers | Carnegie Mellon University | 31 of 31