Women Of Green

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GreenHome NYC is pleased to announce their February 17 monthly forum, The Women of Green, at a location to be determined. In this 1.5 hour presentation, attendees will meet 12 women in the green field, established professionals who are trying and succeeding in changing the environmental movement. The presentation will be done in Pecha Kucha format, where each presenter is allowed 20 images, each shown for 20 seconds - giving 6 minutes 40 seconds of fame before the next presenter is up. This keeps presentations concise, the interest level up, and gives more people the chance to present. This is a forum for women (and maybe well-behaved men) to see the breadth of careers in the sustainable field that don’t involve what we like to call the green “bling” (ground source heat pumps, solar, wind, bamboo, green roofs, and the like).

This will be held as the regular monthly forum meeting of GreenHomeNYC (www.greenhomenyc.org) an all- volunteer organization dedicated to helping people in the NYC region green their lives. It is being done in cooperation with Hunter’s CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities;
Admission is free but attendees can make a tax-deductable contribution to GreenHomeNYC at the forum.

The Women of Green
Chris Benedict, Chris Benedict, RA: Doing more with Less
Catherine Bobenhausen, Veridian Energy and Environmental: Greening Professionals
Erica Brabon, Steven Winter Associates: Health and Safety
Mary Brennan, Community Preservation Corporation: Green Lending
Annie Chadwick, Clinton Community Garden: Community Gardening
Sharon Griffith, NYSERDA: 30 + NYSERDA and Weatherization
Maureen Mahle, Steven Winter Assoc.: Green Design and LEED Certification
Ariella Maron, NYC Department of Citywide Administrative Services: Greening a Government
Charlotte Mathews, The Related Companies: Big and Green
Tatiana Morin, NYC Soil and Water Conservation District: The water we waste
Lesley Patrick, Hunter CUNY ISC: Trees or Global Warming

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Women Of Green

  1. 1. Urban Oases: Reclaiming Residential Yard Space Evan Mason, MA January, 2010
  2. 2. Three-Pronged Approach to Reclaiming Open Space 1. Environmental Science 2. Education 3. Public Policy
  3. 3. Urban Open Space Types • Public: Parks, Greenstreets, Plazas, Street Trees • Private – Courtyards and terraces; – Roofs; – Single family and small scale housing— Riverdale, Staten Island, Sunnyside Gardens; – Rowhouse backyards and front area ways; – Apartment building front, rear and side areaways;
  4. 4. How Much Urban Open Space is There? Summary of Open, Private, Yard, and Residential Space in New York City NYC Manhattan Bronx Brooklyn Queens Staten Island Total Area (acres) 194,739 14,581 27,138 45,811 70,166 37,043 Percent of New York City 100.00% 7.49% 13.94% 23.52% 36.03% 19.02% Open Space 113,077 6,145 16,002 22,606 41,713 26,611 Percent of Total Borough Area - 42.14% 58.96% 49.35% 59.45% 71.84% Percent of Total NYC Area 58.07% 3.16% 8.22% 11.61% 21.42% 13.67% Private Open Space (acres) 53,991 1,831 6,343 10,674 20,975 14,167 Percent of Total Borough Area - 12.56% 23.37% 23.30% 29.89% 38.24% Percent of Total NYC Area 27.72% 0.94% 3.26% 5.48% 10.77% 7.27% Yard Space (acres) 68,026 3,027 8,804 13,504 24,061 18,630 Percent of Total Borough Area - 20.76% 32.44% 29.48% 34.29% 50.29% Percent of Total NYC Area 34.93% 1.55% 4.52% 6.93% 12.36% 9.57% Residential Yard Space (acres) 52,236 2,077 6,438 10,674 19,857 13,190 Percent of Total Borough Area - 14.24% 23.72% 23.30% 28.30% 35.61% Percent of Total NYC Area 26.82% 1.07% 3.31% 5.48% 10.20% 6.77% LANDMARKWEST! AND CUNY Institute for Sustainable Cities, 2008
  5. 5. Historic Preservation + Environmental Benefits = New Approach to Preserving the Built and the Natural Environments
  6. 6. Environmental Benefits • Reducing the amount of water needing treatment by the City’s already overburdened water treatment system; • Reducing temperatures (Urban Heat Island effect) and energy use over the hot summer months; • Air quality improvement and air pollution reduction properties of trees and other vegetation • Habitat
  7. 7. Habitat Ruby-Throated Blue Jay Hummingbird Tufted Titmouse Mourning Dove Downy Woodpecker
  8. 8. Ecological Services and Climate Change Heavy Rains likely to increase precipitation in NYC 7.5-10% Stormwater FACTS: Retain/detain at the Source •27 billion gallons of untreated wastewater flow into our waterways annually; •NYC will have to spend $1.9 billion over the next 10 years to reduce the number of times a year that untreated wastewater flows into our waterways; •1.4 billion gallons of water per inch of rainfall runoff could be captured by the 53,000 acres of residential open space IF it were all covered with permeable surfaces;
  9. 9. Ecological Services Tree, Air Pollution and Urban Heat Island Trees and Vegetation: • Improve air quality; • Reduce temperatures; • Removing pollutants from the air; • Reduce energy consumption where tree canopies shade nearby buildings.
  10. 10. Rowhouse—Garden Core Plunz, R. A History of Housing in New York City
  11. 11. Typical Unclaimed Apartment Building Space Photos: eDesign Dynamics
  12. 12. New York Magazine, 10/19/09
  13. 13. Public Policy • To meet PlaNYC goals, work with property owners to control water from its source, and to encourage owners to plant trees and vegetation; • Tax abatement program to remove concrete; • Consider zoning reform to reduce rear yard additions, limit community facility encroachments into rear yards; • Landmarks Law reform and/or enforcement to protect historic viewshed and city plan
  14. 14. So What can YOU do to help? • Reclaim and Green even small bits of open space to which you have access • Lobby your Building or your Landlord • Be creative—expansive! • Be inspired—encourage others • Develop an affordable, realizable plan that meets your building’s needs
  15. 15. Affordable Strategies to Green your Open Space Sustainably • Rainwater Harvesting—Rain Barrels • Inexpensive timers can be hooked up to hose bibs • Use drought-tolerant plants • Concentrate more maintenance-heavy planting in one area • NYC Council on the Environment— Gardening Fact sheets http://www.cenyc.org/openspace/publications
  16. 16. Affordable Design Drought-tolerant indigenous plants Planters (large and small)
  17. 17. Design for your Building’s Needs •Quiet •Play •Fold Laundry •Exercise •Community Space •Party
  18. 18. Rain barrels for irrigation Permeable Pavements Battery operated irrigation timer Ipe decks over soil
  19. 19. Social Space—Use it! Enjoy it! NY Times 3/13/08
  20. 20. Catherine Bobenhausen Viridian Energy and Environmental, LLC
  21. 21. Erica Brabon Steven Winter Associates, Inc.
  22. 22. Mary A Brennan The Community Preservation Corporation
  23. 23. The Women of Green: Financing Green Retrofits •Refinance Debt •Replace/Upgrade Systems •Investigate Energy Waste •Get all government incentives •Get all utility incentives •Make building more profitable •Also safe, durable, comfortable, efficient February 16, 2010 Mary A. Brennan SVP, Head of Field Offices mbrennan@communityp.com 212-869-5300
  24. 24. Energy Efficiency in 1980 in NYC… • 11,000 buildings owned by the City through tax foreclosure or owner abandonment • Oil increased in price a few hundred percent in five years • NYC Department of Housing Preservation and Development establishes an Office of Energy Conservation
  25. 25. An ad Campaign to teach people how to lower their bills and increase comfort in their apartments! Circa 1982
  26. 26. And for the summer! Circa 1982
  27. 27. HPD Proposed a Prescriptive Energy Code • All multifamily buildings • Phased installation of cost-effective measures • All property tax deductable through J-51 • Assailed by real estate community as government telling owners what to do
  28. 28. The Community Preservation Corporation • Non-profit 501 c(3) Mortgage Finance Company • Founded in 1974 by NY Clearinghouse Banks • Funded via consortium of more than 70 banks and insurance companies • Serving the tri-state region – NY, NJ and CT
  29. 29. CPC Mission – Restoring Urban Communities • Investment in multifamily and mixed use properties in low and moderate neighborhoods • Diversify risk for our participating institutions • Provide an economic platform of investment to spur recovery in distressed communities • Develop and enhance public/private partnerships
  30. 30. The CPC One-Stop Shop Construction & Credit Permanent Enhancement Financing From Participating Banks CPC Public Subsidies & Approvals Technical Assistance Borrower
  31. 31. CPC History and Performance • Since inception more than 136,000 units of low and moderate income housing have been financed • Combined public and private investment of over $7 billion • Loan losses of less than 2% since inception
  32. 32. The CPC Green Initiative • Simple – Access to capital in an illiquid environment – Construction & Permanent Loans for occupied properties • Sensible – Energy retrofits improve property cash flow & increase value – Comply with pending state & federal legislation • Sustainable – Extend efficiency and life cycle of building systems – Contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gases
  33. 33. Target Markets • Existing multifamily housing stock throughout New York State • Occupied cash-flowing rental properties: Must be able to measure energy usage at the beginning so anticipated savings can be measured post retrofit • Gut rehabs and new construction do not qualify for this program.
  34. 34. How does it work? 1. Standard CPC application required with third party reports • Appraisal, Engineering, Environmental 2. Standard credit review of borrower and property 3. Energy Audit - Performed by an Energy Expert • Measure current usage – create a building benchmark • Define retrofit work scope • Monitor the retrofit
  35. 35. CPC buildings - Fuel (#2, #4 & #6) Costs Per Sq. Ft. 30 avg = $1.88 25 20 15 10 5 0 $0.51-1.00 $1.01-1.50 $1.51-2.00 $2.01-2.50 $2.51-3.00 $3.01-3.50 $3.51-4.00 $0-0.50 Outliers Cost/Sq. Ft. ($)
  36. 36. 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 $0-0.50 $0.51-1.00 $1.01-1.50 $1.51-2.00 avg = $1.44 $2.01-2.50 Costs Per Sq. Ft. Cost/Sq. Ft. ($) $2.51-3.00 CPC buildings - Fuel/Gas $3.01-3.50 $3.51-4.00 Outliers
  37. 37. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 $0-.20 $.21-.40 $.41-.60 $.61-.80 $.64 avg = $.81-1.00 $1.01-1.20 $1.21-1.40 $1.41-1.60 $1.61-1.80 Cost/Sq. Ft. ($) Costs Per Sq. Ft. $1.81-2.00 $2.01-2.20 CPC Buildings - Electric (Elevator) $2.21-2.40 $2.41-2.60 $2.61-2.80 $2.81-3.00 Ouliers
  38. 38. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 $0-.20 $.21-.40 $.41-.60 $.61-.80 $.81-1.00 avg = $.68 $1.01-1.20 $1.21-1.40 $1.41-1.60 $1.61-1.80 Cost/Sq. Ft. ($) Costs Per Sq. Ft. $1.81-2.00 CPC Buildings - Water Meter $2.01-2.20 $2.21-2.40 $2.41-2.60 $2.61-2.80 $2.81-3.00 Ouliers
  39. 39. What sort of savings (assume 20%)? • $1.66+ .54 + .58 = $2.78/ft2 • 20% savings = 56¢/ft2 For a 100 unit, 100,000/ft2 property: • $560 savings to owner per apt/year • $56,000 in a 100 unit building annually • Estimated to be between 7-10% of total expenses
  40. 40. Freddie Mac Green PILOT Program • Only available through CPC • Enhanced pricing – 15-30 bps lower for retrofit buildings • Increased Leverage – Up to 80% Loan to Value on Refinances – Added Leverage Used to fund Retrofit • Work done post closing via escrow hold back – Typical scope is $3,000 - $5,000 per unit.
  41. 41. CPC Green Initiative • Simple - One Stop Shop • Sensible - Increase Value and Cash Flow • Sustainable - Better Buildings, Cleaner Environment • Thanks for watching 20 slides…….
  42. 42. Annie Chadwick Clinton Community Garden
  43. 43. Annie Chadwick Clinton Community Garden
  44. 44. Sharon Griffith NYSERDA
  45. 45. The Women of Green Sharon Griffith Project Manager Marketing and Economic Development New York State Energy Research and Development Authority "Some people dream of success while others wake up and work hard at it!"
  46. 46. • In the Beginning – Eco Conscious – Syracuse University – Graduate School – Graduation Day – Bill Moyers reality check
  47. 47. • Recession/Oil Embargo • Energy Conservation • Federal Study: Correlation between Low Income and energy costs. • Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) • No Job Security
  48. 48. • NYS Dept of State, Div. of Economic Opportunity. – CSBG: Community Service Block Grants (shared) • The TEST is the thing. • The Value of a College Degree • Connections to Community Based Organizations – Model Cities • Personal Experience
  49. 49. • Experience • On the Job training – Double paned windows and high dense packed insulation – R value / U value / SIR / SSE – New Diagnostic Technologies • Luck (Right Place/Right time)
  50. 50. • State’s First Energy Auditor exam. • Field Rep exam finally developed • New Director = More technical – Boiler tests, CFL’s, payback, • Affordable Comfort Conferences • Tools of the trade
  51. 51. • Hurdles • Benefits • Continual evolution – Building Science
  52. 52. • Building Science hits its stride • State ethic rules • Harlem Community Development Corp. – Subsidiary of Empire State Development • Director of Weatherization • Management issues (Authorities)
  53. 53. In the interim: • NYSERDA & the Systems Benefit Charge (SBC) • New Residential Director Connects to WAP • NYC office opens
  54. 54. • NYSERDA mission more universal. – Commercial – Residential – Renewables – New technologies: Geothermal/Fuel Cells/ • Multiple Goals – Reduce Energy Use (electricity) – Market Transformation – Increase use of renewables (Solar/Wind)
  55. 55. • Accomplished via – Incentives – Contractor Training – Consumer Education – Technical Support – Marketing programs
  56. 56. • Marketing – Commercial – Residential – Media spokesperson – New York Energy $mart CommunitiesSM • Market Transformation • Economic Development • EE now in Vogue: Green/Climate Change has been the stimulus
  57. 57. • RGGI Funding – Carbon Credit Sales • Green Jobs/Green NY - April 2010 - $112m
  58. 58. • Pathways to a State Gov’t job. • Pathways to a NYSERDA job
  59. 59. • Professional networks • Professional Organizations • Certification Groups
  60. 60. NYC office went from 4 to 6 to 17 • BA in Sociology • BA in Environmental Studies • BA in English Literature • BA in English • MS in Social Work • BA in Psychology • Certificate in Business, • BS in Environmental Science • Administrative Assistant • BA in Physics • BS in Physics • BA in Environmental Design and • BS in Earth, Atmosphere, and Architecture Planetary Sciences • MS in Solid-State Physics • Energy Management • Master’s of Engineering in • Master of Urban Planning Sustainable Energy • MS in City and Regional • BSE in Materials Science and Planning Engineering • M.S.E. in Environmental • BA in Environmental Studies Engineering
  61. 61. • Green Jobs not limited (still confusion) • Challenge of word burnout • Experience • Training
  62. 62. • Proud • Happy • Grateful • Impressed • Scared • Bouyed • Humbled • Willing • Lucky
  63. 63. Energy Efficiency G R E E N
  64. 64. Maureen Mahle Steven Winter Associates, Inc.
  65. 65. Maureen M. Mahle Green Design and LEED® Certification
  66. 66. My company
  67. 67. My job
  68. 68. More on my job Photo: Ken Wyner
  69. 69. Getting Started in Green
  70. 70. “Why learn it wrong?”
  71. 71. Green feels good
  72. 72. Residential green certification LEED for Homes LEED for New Construction National Green Building Standard ENERGY STAR Green Communities
  73. 73. How do you build green?
  74. 74. No, REALLY…
  75. 75. Roles and responsibilities
  76. 76. More roles and responsibilities
  77. 77. Green building is still dirty work
  78. 78. Tackle the technical
  79. 79. Building science still rules
  80. 80. Reasons projects go green
  81. 81. Why certify?
  82. 82. Why certify?
  83. 83. Certification equals motivation
  84. 84. Great LEED Buildings
  85. 85. Charlotte Matthews Related Companies
  86. 86. Big and Green Charlotte Matthews Vice President – Sustainability Related Companies Time Warner Center Columbus Circle, NYC
  87. 87. Roots of Green Countryside Drive Summit, New Jersey
  88. 88. Roots of Big Hong Kong 2005 Hong Kong 1985
  89. 89. Getting to Work Giancarlo Laboratories Brown University Architect: Payette Associates
  90. 90. Planting Seeds for Change A Heat Wheel Source: www.datacenterknowledge.com
  91. 91. Relationships Follow You Café across the street Summer Street, Boston
  92. 92. Directing the Work Bank of America Tower LEED® CS Platinum anticipated The Durst Organization Cook + Fox
  93. 93. Big and Green Tribeca Green Battery Park City, NYC LEED® NC Gold Related Robert A.M. Stern
  94. 94. Executing the Work Construction Waste Management (Done Right, from the Inside)
  95. 95. Managing the Work Archstone Clinton Hells Kitchen, NYC The Lucida LEED® NC Certified UES, NYC The Dermot Company LEED® NC Certification anticipated FXFowle Extell Corporation Cook + Fox
  96. 96. Previous Labors Bearing Fruit The Brompton Upper East Side, NYC LEED® NC Silver anticipated Related Robert A.M. Stern
  97. 97. Entry into “Corporate” Sustainability
  98. 98. Bigger and Green National September 11th Memorial and Museum LEED® NC Gold anticipated
  99. 99. Bigger Target: Industry
  100. 100. Environmentalist as Owner/Developer Snowmass Base Village, Colorado LEED® ND Certification for neighborhood anticipated LEED® NC Silver for individual buildings anticipated
  101. 101. Creating a Corporate Sustainability Strategy https://www.related.com/ourcompany/businesses/16/Sustainability/
  102. 102. Really Big and Green Hudson Yards Planned development of 26-acre Manhattan rail yards LEED® ND Certification for neighborhood committed LEED® NC Silver for individual buildings committed Related Companies
  103. 103. Codifying Green Building
  104. 104. Leading by Example W42nd Street Planned development of 1.2M SF condo, rental, hotel and theatre LEED® NC Silver anticipated Related Companies Arquitectonica and SLCE with Frank Gehry Theatre
  105. 105. Past to Present foretells Open Future The Clarendon / One Back Bay Boston LEED® NC Silver anticipated Related Companies Robert A.M. Stern
  106. 106. Tatiana Morin NYC SWCD
  107. 107. Waste or Resource
  108. 108. 8.25 million New Yorkers + millions of workers and tourists that visit NYC each day PHOTO COURTESY OF:  http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/4nz8PLMyvPRgPpGVyoqQqA
  109. 109. ….stormwater picks up everything off the streets, roofs, sidewalks parking lots and construction sites.. …and takes it down the drain where it combines with sewage
  110. 110. ¼” rain + Combined Sewers + inadequate infrastructure + high % impervious surface = CSOs
  111. 111. CSOs Separate Sewer Outfalls 
  112. 112. Newtown Creek (Courtesy of Riverkeeper) St. Nevin’s Street.
  113. 113. Source:http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/galleries/ Source: Final Report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on Sustainability and the MTA Croton Filtration Plant
  114. 114. Why all this Waste?
  115. 115. The Cost of Water For municipal water you pay 2X: (1) water supplied + (1) sewer costs (Whether the water actually goes down the sewer or not) $5-$7 per 1000 Gallons
  116. 116. The Near Future…..Your wallet Stormwater Rate Structure Study •This would establish a separate pricing structure for stormwater generation characteristic of specific land uses •Potential credit programs are being reviewed to incentivize intallations of stormwater BMPs and water conservation measures
  117. 117. Developments in the Croton Watershed
  118. 118. Marcellus Shale Formation 2008 Production
  119. 119. The Bright Side: plaNYC Opportunities Sustainable Stormwater Management Plan 2008  DDC Construction Code, Local Law 86  of 2005, Design Consulting Guide  2003 DEP Long Term Control Plan, JBWPP Green Roof Tax Abatement Legislation •LIDs •Water Conservation •Smart Use
  120. 120. Principles of LID
  121. 121. Private Development •Urban/suburban/exurban •Residential •Commercial •Industrial Government Facilities •State/local government buildings •Public schools •Public Housing Public Works/ •Public transit Infrastructure •Streets •Highways •Sidewalks •parks
  122. 122. Why Be Water-Efficient? Potable water Stormwater, CSOs & Climate Change sewage flow via water conservation and capturing stormwater flow wastewater = better treatment and less nitrogen loading
  123. 123. The Three Rules of Water Conservation and Efficiency Reduce Repair Retrofit Non-conserving home 72.5 Conserving home 49.6 Savings 32%
  124. 124. I Rent. Why Should I Care? • Increased operating costs provide a basis for landlords to receive larger rent increases under the rent stabilization system • NYC RGB studies operating costs, including water utility costs, each year as part of the rent guidelines process • Ultimately, if you waste, you pay.
  125. 125. Toilets Switch to 1.6 GPF Dual-flush or low-flush toilets Waterless Urinals ~0.8 GPF Washing Showers Standard washing machines use 1.6GPM 40-50 GPL Source: www.farm2.static.flickr.com/1127/55124177 0_e9e9f5.. • 18-25 GPL 12 GPM BAD! Source: Home Depot • 40% less energy Average: 4-7 gpm • Reduced drying Low flow ≤ 2.5 gpm time.
  126. 126. The Bathroom Sink • Hand-washing and tooth-brushing • Do these activities really require high volumes of water? 0.5 gpm The Kitchen Sink • Average  1.5 – 5.0 gpm • Should flow < 2.2 gpm Water temperatures should be reduced to 120o F at point of delivery
  127. 127. Water ↔ Energy = $ •Water regulated the temperature on earth •Vegetation can act to move heat out of the lower atmosphere in the form of vapour phase water •Energy and Water costs are increasing worldwide •Urban Heat Island Effect pronounces these costs
  128. 128. Carina Molnar CUNY ISC
  129. 129. 2006 An Inconvenient Truth  2008 47% of Americans believe that  climate change is caused  by human activity.  2009 36% 
  130. 130. Life In A Laboratory Is  Non‐stop Adventure.  Image drawn by Patsy Chen. 
  131. 131. College level Environmental Studies students  had never read Walden… or even heard of Henry David Thoreau.  I almost cried.  And then I made them read it.  And then they didn’t want to take my class. 
  132. 132. Treating the environment as a “thing,” located in one specific geographic location, that needs your attention for protection,  has not worked. 
  133. 133. Source: Marda Kern
  134. 134. Source: Mary Miss and Marda Kern
  135. 135. Cities can be solutions.  But only if we do them right. 
  136. 136. human behavior and the city Culturally, we love the city. Neurologically, we have a hard time in this place.  Painting: Nancy Weber
  137. 137. “…when people say: ‘As a scientist, would you  say…that we know that people need nature?’ I say: ‘As a scientist I can’t tell you. I’m not  ready to say that,’ ”Kuo said.  “ ‘But as a mother who knows the scientific  literature, I would say, yes.’ ”
  138. 138. This city is what it is because our citizens are what they are. ‐Plato   cmolnar@hunter.cuny.edu
  139. 139. The End Can we have a big hand for our presenters?

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