The Learning Society - presented at Building Learning Society: from Vision to Actions by UNESCO and Vietnam MoET
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The Learning Society - presented at Building Learning Society: from Vision to Actions by UNESCO and Vietnam MoET

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The Learning Society - presented at Building Learning Society: from Vision to Actions by UNESCO and Vietnam MoET The Learning Society - presented at Building Learning Society: from Vision to Actions by UNESCO and Vietnam MoET Presentation Transcript

  • Building a Learning Society Phan Thanh Son CTO & Partner Director, Cisco Vietnam sonphan@cisco.com www.cisco.com/go/education 1
  • Globalization is Transforming Learning      2
  • Globalization is Transforming Learning  The world isn’t flat, it’s spiky     3
  • Globalization is Transforming Learning  The world isn’t flat, it’s spiky  All countries are in a race to the top of the value chain    4
  • Globalization is Transforming Learning  The world isn’t flat, it’s spiky  All countries are in a race to the top of the value chain  No prizes for second place   5
  • Globalization is Transforming Learning  The world isn’t flat, it’s spiky  All countries are in a race to the top of the value chain  No prizes for second place  Increased need for cultural understanding and personal identity  6
  • Globalization is Transforming Learning  The world isn’t flat, it’s spiky  All countries are in a race to the top of the value chain  No prizes for second place  Increased need for cultural understanding and personal identity  Learning itself (and the education industry) has globalized 7
  • Demographic Change Demands Lifelong Learning     8
  • Demographic Change Demands Lifelong Learning  Aging populations increase dependency ratios  ‘Hourglass’ populations mean large numbers of students, and very few teachers  Faster change and longer working lives mean that multi-jobbing and reskilling will become the norm  A global need for increased workforce participation – a loss of $45bn per year 9
  • Turkey Czech Republic Italy 50 Slovak Republic Mexico Portugal Hungary Austria Germany Greece Poland New Zealand Switzerland OECD average United Kingdom Netherlands Iceland Luxembourg Sweden Finland Australia United States France Spain Denmark Belgium Ireland Norway Korea Japan Canada An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life 60 55-64 25-34 40 30 20 10 0 10
  • An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life Today: A spectrum of educational provision Better Worse 11
  • An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life 1: Catch-Up: Access, quality, equity Today: A spectrum of educational provision Better Worse 12
  • An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life 1: Catch-Up: Access, quality, equity 2: Establish Basic Education Today: A spectrum of educational provision Better Worse 13
  • An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life 3: Quality: 21st Century skills for all 1: Catch-Up: Access, quality, equity 2: Establish Basic Education Today: A spectrum of educational provision Better Worse 14
  • An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life 4. Lifelong learning, retraining, upskilling 3: Quality: 21st Century skills for all 1: Catch-Up: Access, quality, equity 2: Establish Basic Education Today: A spectrum of educational provision Better Worse 15
  • An Endless Demand For Learning Throughout Life 5. Meeting Latent Demand – edutainment, informal learning 4. Lifelong learning, retraining, upskilling 3: Quality: 21st Century skills for all 1: Catch-Up: Access, quality, equity 2: Establish Basic Education Today: A spectrum of educational provision Better Worse 16
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs       17
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process      18
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process  Motivation is critical to effective learning     19
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process  Motivation is critical to effective learning  Learners bring different knowledge to a new learning challenge and follow different routes to the same learning outcome    20
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process  Motivation is critical to effective learning  Learners bring different knowledge to a new learning challenge and follow different routes to the same learning outcome  To be effective, knowledge should be discovered as an authentic, integrated whole   21
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process  Motivation is critical to effective learning  Learners bring different knowledge to a new learning challenge and follow different routes to the same learning outcome  To be effective, knowledge should be discovered as an authentic, integrated whole  What does a truly personalised learning environment look like?  22
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process  Motivation is critical to effective learning  Learners bring different knowledge to a new learning challenge and follow different routes to the same learning outcome  To be effective, knowledge should be discovered as an authentic, integrated whole  What does a truly personalised learning environment look like?  23
  • Meeting Learners’ Changing Needs  Learning is an active, social process  Motivation is critical to effective learning  Learners bring different knowledge to a new learning challenge and follow different routes to the same learning outcome  To be effective, knowledge should be discovered as an authentic, integrated whole  What does a truly personalised learning environment look like?  How do we harness data and technology to build it at scale? 24
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom        25
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere       26
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere  Students only spend 14% of their time in school      27
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere  Students only spend 14% of their time in school  60% is with parents, friends and in the community     28
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere  Students only spend 14% of their time in school  60% is with parents, friends and in the community  At work, employees learn 70% of their job from colleagues    29
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere  Students only spend 14% of their time in school  60% is with parents, friends and in the community  At work, employees learn 70% of their job from colleagues  Every hour of formal training is matched to 4 hours of informal learning   30
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere  Students only spend 14% of their time in school  60% is with parents, friends and in the community  At work, employees learn 70% of their job from colleagues  Every hour of formal training is matched to 4 hours of informal learning  In school: Powerful peer effects for good and ill...  31
  • The Power of Informal Learning: Looking Beyond the Classroom Informal learning is everywhere  Students only spend 14% of their time in school  60% is with parents, friends and in the community  At work, employees learn 70% of their job from colleagues  Every hour of formal training is matched to 4 hours of informal learning  In school: Powerful peer effects for good and ill...  How do we harness this to personalise learning and reduce bottlenecks? 32
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Automation Transformation 33
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Transformation Quality of experience Automation Time 34
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Quality of experience Automation Transformation Traditional classroom Time 35
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Quality of experience Automation Transformation Online/ blended learning Traditional classroom Time 36
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Quality of experience Automation Transformation Online/ blended learning Traditional classroom Time 37
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Quality of experience Automation Transformation Online/ blended learning New Technologies • Ubiquitous connectivity • Mobility • Collaboration • Security • Video • Presence Traditional classroom Time 38
  • Technology is (Finally) Ripe for Education Quality of experience Automation Transformation Online/ blended learning New Technologies • Ubiquitous connectivity • Mobility • Collaboration • Security • Video • Presence Traditional classroom Time 39
  • Bigger ≠ Better     40
  • Bigger ≠ Better  Increased ‘schoolification’ cannot succeed Ten million new teachers will be needed to get an additional 260 million students into education systems in China, India, Indonesia, and Nigeria    41
  • Bigger ≠ Better  Increased ‘schoolification’ cannot succeed Ten million new teachers will be needed to get an additional 260 million students into education systems in China, India, Indonesia, and Nigeria  We’re fighting the wrong battle More years in school does not improve economic performance – improved learning does  Internal, incremental reform is challenged by education systems’ complexity and interdependence 42
  • A Learners’ World  A World of Free Content Need to discern, not just know Alternatives to school & teacher      43
  • A Learners’ World  A World of Free Content Need to discern, not just know Alternatives to school & teacher  Living in a Social Network Drawn by the presence of their friends and peers, and the freedom offered by unmoderated, adult-free public spaces    44
  • A Learners’ World  A World of Free Content Need to discern, not just know Alternatives to school & teacher  Living in a Social Network Drawn by the presence of their friends and peers, and the freedom offered by unmoderated, adult-free public spaces  Technology is Pervasive Own several devices (cell phones, music players, etc) One third do not use a landline 45
  • New Roles for Existing Players Government: Become the regulator of The Learning Society School Systems: Move to Education 3.0 and effectively manage innovation Higher Education: Play a full role – Extend reach and preserve quality 46
  • Putting Learners at the Heart of the Learning Society Achieved in Holistic Transformation Education 3.0 Education 2.0 21st Century Learning Education 1.0 Traditional Education Systems Curriculum Leadership High-quality Infrastructure & Technology Leadership, People & Culture Teachers Accountability 21st Century Curriculum, Pedagogy & Assessment Supported by Adapted System Reform 47
  • New Roles for New Players Social innovators: RSA Academy, YF Studio Schools, Pratham, Hole-in-the-Wall Businesses of all sizes Social investors: Major global foundations & philanthropists Informal learning providers and cultural institutions: NMOLP, Smithsonian, British Library 48
  • Opportunity & Challenge  Considerable promise and opportunity Improved results for more people with fewer resources. Re-professionalize teaching Possibility of effective, data-driven decisions  Transforming systems to meet need How does school learning have to change to become a foundation, not an end? Where else do students learn? How do we embrace those modes? How do we safely share physical and virtual spaces? How do we innovate? How do we do this all at once...? 49
  • What Does it Really Take…? 50
  • What Does it Really Take…? 1 Build a new coalition 51
  • What Does it Really Take…? 1 Build a new coalition 2 Embrace a mixture of learning providers 52
  • What Does it Really Take…? 1 Build a new coalition 2 Embrace a mixture of learning providers 3 Provide access to a shared learning infrastructure 53
  • What Does it Really Take…? 1 Build a new coalition 2 Embrace a mixture of learning providers 3 Provide access to a shared learning infrastructure 4 Invest more time and money in learning 54
  • What Does it Really Take…? 1 Build a new coalition 2 Embrace a mixture of learning providers 3 Provide access to a shared learning infrastructure 4 Invest more time and money in learning 5 Develop new funding models 55
  • What Does it Really Take…? 6 Adopt legitimate, standard credentialing systems 56
  • What Does it Really Take…? 6 Adopt legitimate, standard credentialing systems 7 Agree a standard framework for assessing the impact of innovations in learning supported by substantial funding 57
  • What Does it Really Take…? 6 Adopt legitimate, standard credentialing systems 7 Agree a standard framework for assessing the impact of innovations in learning supported by substantial funding 8 Reform global assessment regimes 58
  • What Does it Really Take…? 6 Adopt legitimate, standard credentialing systems 7 Agree a standard framework for assessing the impact of innovations in learning supported by substantial funding 8 Reform global assessment regimes 9 Develop new ways of managing lifelong support relationships with the learner 59
  • What Does it Really Take…? 6 Adopt legitimate, standard credentialing systems 7 Agree a standard framework for assessing the impact of innovations in learning supported by substantial funding 8 Reform global assessment regimes 9 Develop new ways of managing lifelong support relationships with the learner 10 Fund a diversity of innovators 60
  • www.cisco.com/go/education 61
  • The 95-year-old keeping traditional Vietnamese music alive via Internet Source: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-23795983 62
  • Professional training by Stanford Prof. for students from Hanoi and HCMC 63
  • Cisco Webex to power Bridges 2012 by MoET & Bridges One recording: https://cisco.webex.com/ciscosales/ lsr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=6497 4642&rKey=441d13b0e01c0026 64
  • Vietnam NetRider 2011 via Webex between 5 cities for hundreds students 65
  • Havard và MIT lần đầu chấp nhận mở lớp học trực tuyến Harvard and MIT first time open online classes Source: http://duhoc.dantri.com.vn/c734/s734-592314/havard-va-mit-lan-dau-chap-nhan-mo-lop-hoc-truc-tuyen.htm 66
  • 10 months HBS class room for class of Cisco 50 managers from Korea, Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam My Check list: • Absent: 1 • From TP room: 1 • From hotel: 3 • From airport: 2 • From customer sites: 2 • By Mobile Video: > 90% • By 3G modem: 3 • Virtually: 100% ! http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=rI62SOlA6m8 (My Harvard Dream) 67