d.Maps: Design Cultural Maps Discussion 3 [email_address]
Agenda
Project 1 Results <ul><li>I tried… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned… </li></ul><ul><li>I felt </li></ul>
Testing <ul><ul><ul><li>Ask : What are you thinking? Why? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect : What is their firs...
Transition: Inspiration
 
Prototype (n):  an incomplete representation of an idea that helps answer a question
Prototyping <ul><li>&quot;Prototyping is the iterative development of artifacts – digital, physical, or experiential – int...
Flaring & Narrowing <ul><li>The flaring represents the proliferation of low-resolution prototypes developed as different a...
Why Prototype? <ul><li>Prototyping allows you to fully explore all of those concepts you want to evaluate </li></ul><ul><l...
<ul><li>If a picture is worth a thousand words, a prototype is worth a thousand pictures </li></ul>
Big idea 1 Prototype Early : Fail Early Big idea 2 Big idea 3 color
Prototype Often
Examples
kinds of prototypes function look feel experience
How are prototypes used? inspire  ·  express  ·  test  ·  refine  ·   validate early stage  mid stage  late stage
express an idea without owning it create an opportunity for collaboration hold it, use it, talk about it bring questions t...
mid-stage prototypes rough rapid right
rough <ul><li>build as crude as possible  </li></ul><ul><li>crummy prototypes are ideal   </li></ul>Prototypes aren’t prec...
rapid don’t waste time building non-essentials use what’s available
right create a menu of prototypes prototype one aspect at a time test the riskiest ideas first
how to use prototypes <ul><li>ask a variety of users </li></ul><ul><li>observe, don’t explain </li></ul><ul><li>expect une...
Advice <ul><li>celebrate failure  </li></ul>create a workspace  conducive to prototyping never enter a meeting  without a ...
Prototyping: Principles <ul><li>Isolate your variables: </li></ul><ul><li>Call waiting by standing in line at post office ...
Prototyping: Principles <ul><li>Use what you have </li></ul><ul><li>Bias toward action </li></ul>
Transition <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
House Keeping <ul><li>Blogging, social media, and calendar </li></ul>
Debrief <ul><li>I like </li></ul><ul><li>I wish </li></ul><ul><li>How to </li></ul>
Credits <ul><li>Material adapted from dschool.stanford.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Special thanks to Carly Geehr and David Klaus...
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d.Maps: Discussion 3 Prototyping

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  • Intro Names and 1 artistic or cultural thing you noticed on the way to this course?
  • The act of prototyping implies &amp;quot;building&amp;quot;, testing, and iterating and is, itself, both a flaring and a narrowing process
  • Classic example NASA Challenger
  • separate early and mid stage prototypes a little more. include the differences of focusing on a specific feature/function (looks like/works like) building rough prototypes: brings questions to the surface (learn by doing) gets the idea out there without too much personal investment conversation piece--stand around talking about it.
  • there’s magic in the early stage prototypes. Expressing an idea in physical form is like giving it life. brings questions to the surface (learn by doing) gets the idea out there without too much personal investment conversation piece--stand around talking about it.
  • Asking a variety of users is not necessarily the same as asking a LOT of users. Pick your sample carefully. Give people space to play. Note what they notice first. How they use/misuse something. What comes naturally. Never say, “no, that’s not the way you do it.” (6” piston example). We have to get into the mentality that when someone uses a device in a way that’s incorrect, they’re not the ones that are wrong. It is the designer that is wrong. R.espect the user Give example of people
  • Asking a variety of users is not necessarily the same as asking a LOT of users. Pick your sample carefully. Give people space to play. Note what they notice first. How they use/misuse something. What comes naturally. Never say, “no, that’s not the way you do it.” (6” piston example). We have to get into the mentality that when someone uses a device in a way that’s incorrect, they’re not the ones that are wrong. It is the designer that is wrong. R.espect the user Give example of people
  • start at 10:30 isolate your variables: call waiting by standing in line at post office
  • isolate your variables: call waiting by standing in line at post office
  • d.Maps: Discussion 3 Prototyping

    1. 1. d.Maps: Design Cultural Maps Discussion 3 [email_address]
    2. 2. Agenda
    3. 3. Project 1 Results <ul><li>I tried… </li></ul><ul><li>I learned… </li></ul><ul><li>I felt </li></ul>
    4. 4. Testing <ul><ul><ul><li>Ask : What are you thinking? Why? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect : What is their first impression? What’s working? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask : How would you do [x] task…? (repeat) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect : What new errors, problems, questions have emerged? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask : How would you change [x] task…?(repeat) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect : What unexpected things are happening? </li></ul></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Transition: Inspiration
    6. 7. Prototype (n): an incomplete representation of an idea that helps answer a question
    7. 8. Prototyping <ul><li>&quot;Prototyping is the iterative development of artifacts – digital, physical, or experiential – intended to elicit qualitative or quantitative feedback.&quot; (Geehr, 2008) </li></ul>
    8. 9. Flaring & Narrowing <ul><li>The flaring represents the proliferation of low-resolution prototypes developed as different aspects of the prototype are evaluated and the narrowing represents the refinement of the lower resolution models into increasingly complex and resolved models. </li></ul>
    9. 10. Why Prototype? <ul><li>Prototyping allows you to fully explore all of those concepts you want to evaluate </li></ul><ul><li>You prototype because you need to explore your options -- to try things and fail, further informing your design process </li></ul><ul><li>Prototyping is a way to do your due diligence on the concepts that came out of ideation </li></ul>
    10. 11. <ul><li>If a picture is worth a thousand words, a prototype is worth a thousand pictures </li></ul>
    11. 12. Big idea 1 Prototype Early : Fail Early Big idea 2 Big idea 3 color
    12. 13. Prototype Often
    13. 14. Examples
    14. 15. kinds of prototypes function look feel experience
    15. 16. How are prototypes used? inspire · express · test · refine · validate early stage mid stage late stage
    16. 17. express an idea without owning it create an opportunity for collaboration hold it, use it, talk about it bring questions to the surface early-stage prototypes anything more substantial than arm-waving
    17. 18. mid-stage prototypes rough rapid right
    18. 19. rough <ul><li>build as crude as possible </li></ul><ul><li>crummy prototypes are ideal </li></ul>Prototypes aren’t precious. Learnings are.
    19. 20. rapid don’t waste time building non-essentials use what’s available
    20. 21. right create a menu of prototypes prototype one aspect at a time test the riskiest ideas first
    21. 22. how to use prototypes <ul><li>ask a variety of users </li></ul><ul><li>observe, don’t explain </li></ul><ul><li>expect unexpected insights </li></ul>
    22. 23. Advice <ul><li>celebrate failure </li></ul>create a workspace conducive to prototyping never enter a meeting without a prototype when in doubt, prototype
    23. 24. Prototyping: Principles <ul><li>Isolate your variables: </li></ul><ul><li>Call waiting by standing in line at post office </li></ul>
    24. 25. Prototyping: Principles <ul><li>Use what you have </li></ul><ul><li>Bias toward action </li></ul>
    25. 26. Transition <ul><li>Questions? </li></ul>
    26. 27. House Keeping <ul><li>Blogging, social media, and calendar </li></ul>
    27. 28. Debrief <ul><li>I like </li></ul><ul><li>I wish </li></ul><ul><li>How to </li></ul>
    28. 29. Credits <ul><li>Material adapted from dschool.stanford.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Special thanks to Carly Geehr and David Klaus (AMIO Engineering, July 2007) for allowing shamelessly stolen inspiration </li></ul>

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