d.Maps: Design Cultural Maps Lab 1

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d.Maps: Design Cultural Maps Lab 1

*Material adapted from dschool.stanford.edu
*Special thanks to Carly Geehr, Rich Crandell, Susie Wise, Erica Estrada for allowing shamelessly stolen inspiration

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  • Intro Names and 1 artistic or cultural thing you noticed on the way to this course?
  • Find a “cool” professor willing to give you independent study units
  • Summary will be sent out in private Contact List spreadsheet
  • Private contact list distributed via email, please make sure it’s up to date
  • Results from class dump
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • You should be familiar with the empathy map by now
  • the first way i try to break things down is into spectra - helps you identify themes across users and solutions and call out metrics you might use to make design decisions the way i might try to understand my map /culture/art interviews: speed, franticness, emotional, social, routine
  • the first way i try to break things down is into spectra - helps you identify themes across users and solutions and call out metrics you might use to make design decisions the way i might try to understand my map /culture/art interviews: speed, franticness, emotional, social, routine
  • For example, think of people that have hectic lives and are sleeping in a different place every night – what are the reasons behind that? you’ve just found something that a homeless person, businessman, and prostitute have in common. it’s finding links like those and asking questions that no one has asked before that gets you to exciting insights.
  • How does the safety of use of a map or a artistic cultural experience?
  • How do the affordances of public art change things?
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Print me as a cheat sheet
  • Here is an example process of how you might get to a POV. This can be used in conjunction with (to tee up) the Path to POV Activity.
  • Don’t necessarily take 5 minutes to demonstrate Space Saturation—this is specific for the in-class Path to POV activity. But this is the moment where you quickly demonstrate Space Saturation. Have some pre-printed pictures of the Empathy stages of the Next Gen workforce project ready to post on a rolling whiteboard. Briefly tell each user’s story, and put quotes up on post-its that you want to remember.
  • Next step is to synthesize some of the data to reveal needs and insights.
  • This is the tee up to demonstrate three types of synthesis modes. These are by no means exhaustive, but are three that might be useful to define a POV.
  • Demonstrate what a 2x2 might look like in the context of the NextGen Workforce. See ‘Path to POV Demo’ notes page for ideas.
  • Demonstrate what a Journey/Process Map might look like in the context of the NextGen Workforce. See ‘Path to POV Demo’ notes page for ideas.
  • Demonstrate what user grouping might look like in the context of the NextGen Workforce. See ‘Path to POV Demo’ notes page for ideas.
  • During Synthesis, it is up to the design team to pick what methods to try. I might first try 2x2 and then a Journey/Process map…
  • …or user grouping followed by laddering….it doesn’t matter. The important thing is for the team to be aware of their process and for the facilitator to move onto another method when the need + insight finding has become dry.
  • This might be used as a way to get a group brain dump of all the users, needs and insights they have uncovered. Demonstrate what this might look like.
  • Why can’t a need be a solution? Well, try to ideate and innovate on needs that are solutions. For example, Grover needs a job that starts at 10:30am. Ok, so you make his job start at 10:30am. What’s so innovative about that? Too obvious.
  • How most people frame their problems Usually only include a statement of user and need. User - usually a general and analytical statement Need - usually stated as a solution
  • give your project an anchor
  • we give you a starting point
  • it’s your job to turn that into a vector
  • give your project an anchor – we call this a POV
  • and, if found to be lacking, it has the ability to be re-shaped
  • there’s a danger in being too vague – you don’t to throw your specific insights out the window.
  • say through your needfinding, you've discovered that your user has a terrible mouse problem. they're everywhere, and her mousetraps just aren't working, for whatever reason. you're super proud of yourself for identifying this need, and you might say that your POV is that sue needs a better mousetrap - or if we're being careful to avoid using nouns, as you should, sue needs a better way to deal with her mouse problem.
  • sure that's ok.. but does it give you enough information? how will you know you've hit on something great? how will you start coming up with ideas?
  • point is, there isn't much here to work with. "better" isn't exactly the most meaningful, generative word.
  • what if.... you dug a bit deeper, found a bit more behind the mouse problem – your user’s values, wishes, behaviors… you tried to design the most humane mousetrap? the greenest? the fastest? the easiest to use? the cheapest? the most beautiful? one made entirely of tinkertoys? a child-safe mousetrap?
  • each of these falls under the "better" category but they're all so much juicier - much more inspiring – they give you an anchor, and a nudge in the right direction
  • the best way i've found to keep myself on track is another acronym: Priorities Objectives Vision
  • the best way i've found to keep myself on track is another acronym: Priorities Objectives Vision
  • the best way i've found to keep myself on track is another acronym: Priorities Objectives Vision
  • the best way i've found to keep myself on track is another acronym: Priorities Objectives Vision
  • so, using our mousetrap example, we might say user: sue need: a better way to take care of her mouse problem insight: she feels terrible about hurting them but really wants them gone
  • d.Maps: Design Cultural Maps Lab 1

    1. 1. d.Maps: Design Cultural Maps Lab 1 [email_address]
    2. 2. House Keeping <ul><li>Units </li></ul><ul><li>Skillsets </li></ul><ul><li>Logistics </li></ul><ul><li>Equipment Access </li></ul><ul><li>Tech- Blog and Backlight </li></ul>
    3. 3. Units <ul><li>Contact [email_address] if you need units under another department </li></ul>
    4. 4. Skillsets <ul><li>Post Its Exercise </li></ul>
    5. 5. Logistics <ul><li>We may need to meet in d.school on Monday depending on class size </li></ul><ul><li>Stay tuned for d.school handout with guidelines etc. </li></ul>
    6. 6. Tech <ul><li>Blog login culturalmaps.org/wp-admin/ </li></ul><ul><li>Username/Password via email </li></ul><ul><li>Sign up for Backlight.org ASAP using primary Stanford email address listed on our contact list </li></ul>
    7. 7. Equipment Access <ul><li>You can check out equipment from Bruce Boyd at the d.school anytime you can catch him in addition to Meyer </li></ul><ul><li>Depending on our needs we may have a dedicated set of equipment </li></ul><ul><li>Submit any wishes to Enrique asap! </li></ul>
    8. 11. Synthesize Empathy Learnings <ul><li>3 Biggest Learnings </li></ul><ul><li>Quotes & Defining Words </li></ul><ul><li>Actions & Behaviors </li></ul><ul><li>Thoughts & Beliefs </li></ul>
    9. 18. Synthesis Methods Summary <ul><li>2x2 </li></ul><ul><li>Empathy Map </li></ul><ul><li>Grouping </li></ul><ul><li>Journey map </li></ul><ul><li>Why laddering </li></ul>
    10. 19. Synthesis: Methods
    11. 20. Synthesis: Methods speed: slow fast
    12. 21. Synthesis: Methods franticness: calm totally frazzled
    13. 22. Synthesis: Methods emotion: stoic embroiled
    14. 23. Synthesis: Methods social: anti- hyper-
    15. 24. Synthesis: Methods routine: consistent dynamic
    16. 25. Synthesis: Methods Safety: Safe Risk
    17. 26. Synthesis: Methods Public Art: Non-Interactive Interactive
    18. 27. Synthesis: Next Step? <ul><li>Once you've organized your information, what's the next step? </li></ul>
    19. 28. DEFINE
    20. 30. What is DEFINE? <ul><li>The goal of this mode is to come up with at least one actionable problem statement. This actionable problem statement (often referred to as a POV) is the guiding statement that focuses on the insights that you uncovered from real users. </li></ul>
    21. 31. Goal of DEFINE <ul><li>To expose new innovation opportunities by looking at problems differently </li></ul><ul><li>To guide innovation efforts </li></ul><ul><li>To help a team confirm that what they've identified is something worth working on </li></ul>
    22. 37. Define Methods Summary <ul><li>Metaphor </li></ul><ul><li>Mad lib </li></ul><ul><li>Personal ads </li></ul>
    23. 39. Let’s go through an example… REDEFINE THE MAP EXPERIENCE FOR THE NEXT GENERATION
    24. 43. SYNTHESIS METHODS Tools to draw out NEEDS, INSIGHTS and SURPRISES
    25. 44. <ul><li>Label Axes </li></ul><ul><li>Try Placing Elements w/ Post-its </li></ul><ul><li>See what insights, needs, surprises are discovered </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat! </li></ul>SYNTHESIS METHODS
    26. 45. <ul><li>Pick an artifact/process </li></ul><ul><li>Make a timeline of it’s life </li></ul><ul><li>See what needs, insights, are discovered </li></ul><ul><li>Repeat! </li></ul>SYNTHESIS METHODS
    27. 46. <ul><li>Objective: To find patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Group users in as many ways as you can </li></ul><ul><li>Keep a list of the groupings (these are your user groups) </li></ul><ul><li>See what needs, insights, surprises are discovered </li></ul>SYNTHESIS METHODS
    28. 51. Grover needs NOUN a job that starts at 10:30am. to be allowed flexibility. VERB ✔
    29. 52. User + Need + Insight Empathetic language Deep! Emotions! Surprise! Only know from observations/conversations
    30. 53. Why POV? <ul><li>Provide focus/Frame the problem </li></ul><ul><li>Inspire your team </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a reference for evaluating competing ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Empower your team to make decisions independently in parallel </li></ul><ul><li>Fuel brainstorms by suggesting “how might we” problem statements </li></ul><ul><li>Capture the hearts and minds of people you meet </li></ul><ul><li>Save you from the impossible task of developing concepts that are all things to all people </li></ul><ul><li>Be something you revisit and reformulate as you learn by doing </li></ul>
    31. 54. Define <ul><li>distill it even further </li></ul>
    32. 55. Define <ul><li>distill it even further </li></ul>
    33. 56. Define <ul><li>distill it even further </li></ul>
    34. 57. Define <ul><li>distill it even further </li></ul><ul><li>(we call this a POV) </li></ul>
    35. 58. Define <ul><li>What do you think makes for a good point of view? </li></ul>
    36. 59. Define <ul><li>What do you think makes for a good point of view? </li></ul><ul><li>generative </li></ul>
    37. 60. Define <ul><li>What do you think makes for a good point of view? </li></ul><ul><li>generative </li></ul><ul><li>suggests evaluation criteria </li></ul>
    38. 61. Define <ul><li>What do you think makes for a good point of view? </li></ul><ul><li>generative </li></ul><ul><li>suggests evaluation criteria </li></ul><ul><li>testable (and reshapable) </li></ul>
    39. 62. Define <ul><li>What do you think makes for a good point of view? </li></ul><ul><li>generative </li></ul><ul><li>suggests evaluation criteria </li></ul><ul><li>testable (and reshapable) </li></ul><ul><li>doesn't imply specific solution - PRESERVES AMBIGUITY </li></ul>
    40. 63. Define <ul><li>What do you think makes for a good point of view? </li></ul><ul><li>generative </li></ul><ul><li>suggests evaluation criteria </li></ul><ul><li>testable (and reshapable) </li></ul><ul><li>doesn't imply specific solution - PRESERVES AMBIGUITY </li></ul><ul><li>but narrow enough that it focuses your project </li></ul>
    41. 64. Define: Mousetrap
    42. 65. Define: Mousetrap Sue needs a better way to deal with her mouse problem.
    43. 66. Define: Mousetrap Sue needs a better way to deal with her mouse problem.
    44. 67. Define: Mousetrap What if…?
    45. 68. Define: Mousetrap Sue needs a better way to deal with her mouse problem.
    46. 69. Define P O V
    47. 70. Define Priorities O V
    48. 71. Define Priorities Objectives V
    49. 72. Define Priorities Objectives Vision
    50. 73. Define: Quick Formula USER + NEED + INSIGHT
    51. 74. Define: Activity Time!!
    52. 75. EXPERMENT 2- STEP BY STEP <ul><li>Empathy : Observe and interview follow ups from Experiment 1 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Refine your observation and question strategy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Try different perspectives and roles </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Define : Synthesize data from empathy work and create POV(s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Use new synthesize and define techniques covered in this presentation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ideate : Brainstorm ways to solve the needs of your POV(s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Share your POV(s) with someone outside of the seminar </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Prototype : Create at least 1 non-digital prototype </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Feel free to use any material at the d.school! </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>I’ll be prototyping on Sunday night </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Test: Show your prototype to your POV(s) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Try to iterate and be prepared to discuss in our seminar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>* Don’t worry if you’re unsure how to brainstorm or prototype, we’ll cover this in our next seminar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>*Document the process by uploading any inspirations to culturalmaps.backlight.org in the Experiment 2 Gallery </li></ul></ul>
    53. 76. Credits <ul><li>Material adapted from dschool.stanford.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Special thanks to Carly Geehr, Rich Crandell, Susie Wise, Erica Estrada for allowing shamelessly stolen inspiration </li></ul>

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