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Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
Commissioner basic part iv - web
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Commissioner basic part iv - web

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  • Have this screen showing as participants enter room.
  • This is session four of the Commissioner Basic Training program
  • Review the learning objectives together.
  • Invite participants to tell of visits to committees or report to Assistant District Commissioner. Ask for responses regarding requests to schedule time with unit leader and committee chair to do a Unit Self Assessment and set/review goals for Journey to Excellence program.
  • Review the learning role of unit commissioners together.
  • Review the roles together. The first level of support (or where to turn for help) for LDS unit commissioners is the their immediate stake leader. If the stake leader needs help or clarification, they may turn to the high councilman over their area. If the need arises, the high councilman may turn to the ADC Chair, or stake presidency member over Scouting, for counsel. The stake leaders are to be the primary sources for recruiting the commissioner staff.
  • Where else can a commissioner go to learn more about his/her role?
  • Where else can a commissioner go to learn more about his/her role?
  • Who is the Membership Chair for your district? Discuss the points made on the slide about membership functions How do we grow Membership in an LDS unit? How do we grow Membership in a Community unit? What ideas would you implement for a Fall and Spring Roundup?
  • How would you suggest reaching out to the non-LDS in our typical Utah communities?
  • What is the most effective way to keep boys in Scouting?
  • Lead a discussion to ensure a thorough understanding of the unit charter renewal process. What could you as a unit commissioner do to help during the month prior to the rechartering?
  • If these steps are undertaken, they will alleviate most of the stress normally felt by those who handle rechartering. The main key to making this work is to have a functioning membership person on each committee. Early preparation is the name of the game here. A systematic contacting of parents regarding subscriptions for Boys’ Life is an easy way to get this invaluable magazine into the hands of the boys. Do you see where you as a unit commissioner could be helping?
  • There are only a few people who are critical to make this a smooth procedure. The unit commissioner is one of them. Work with your COR and Committee Chair to make sure there is a full committee at least by the time of rechartering. This process can be compared to getting ready for an LDS ward conference. Things should already be in place. There should be no need for a last minute crash effort. Adherence to these suggested dates will alleviate a lot of grief on the night the charter is to be turned in. The COR should not have to be directly involved, but he should be comfortable knowing the responsible committee members are taking care of it – in an orderly and timely fashion.
  • Charter be presented to the Institutional Head at a meeting where parents and boys are present .
  • The annual commissioner service plan includes eight specific functions: Membership Inventory Uniform Inspection Quality Unit Goal Setting and Measurement Leadership Inventory Charter Presentation Ceremony Unit program Planning Youth Protection Visit Other Commissioner Functions
  • Do you know the patient’s vital signs? Use the Commissioner Fieldbook to look up the vital signs of a unit we have to be concerned about as a ‘Lifesaving Commissioner.
  • Did you find them all? Is your unit suffering from one or more of these? If yes, what are you prepared to do about it?
  • If your unit is missing any of the Vital Signs, don ’t wait. Go into action now. Prioritize the greatest concerns and allow the highest to receive your most careful attention. Generate a real atmosphere of teamwork – by involving the other people you talk with. Gain commitment to help. Give specific things to do. Organize efforts around tangible activities.
  • Discuss the list of hurry cases and suggested ideas for help. Look on pages 29-30 in the Commissioner Fieldbook for more details.
  • Continue going back to the Commissioner Fieldbook and review as needed. Attend the monthly District Commissioner Staff Meeting.
  • Use the Self –Evaluation for Unit Commissioners prior to your next visit. See Commissioner Fieldbook pg. 56.
  • Review what has been covered in this final section of the training course.
  • Close with the following statement – As a leader, you have made a personal commitment to Scouting. What a fine opportunity for you as a commissioner.” As you take this opportunity, the rewards of Commissioner Service will be yours as you provide meaningful service and see your units build youth of Character, Good Citizenship and Personal Fitness.
  • The Challenge is to be presented in a meaningful way. Give out graduation certificates and Trained Patches
  • Commissioning Ceremony by District Executive
  • Transcript

    • 1. Commissioner Basic TrainingPage 1 GCR 2005
    • 2. Commissioner Basic Training Part IV of IV: How to Help a Unit (Cont)Page 2 GCR 2005
    • 3. Session Learning Objectives Four At the end of this session, you should be able to: • Be familiar with the roles of unit and administrative commissioners. • Understand membership management. • Know the unit charter renewal process and your role in it. • Explain the annual commissioner service plan. • Know how to use commissioner lifesaving techniques to resolve serious unit problems. • Make a meaningful visit to a unit.Page 3 GCR 2005
    • 4. Unit Visitation Reports Reports on 1) visits to unit meetings, committees, and youth planning meetings; 2) visits with unit leader and committee chair; 3) requests to do a Unit Self- Assessment; and 4) set/review goals for Journey to Excellence. Commissioner Challenge: Continue developing familiarity with resource material and your understanding of the total situation in the unit. Continue developing your relationships with the unit leaders and committee. Continue making the monthly visits. Review “Unit Contacts” section in Commissioner Fieldbook – pg. 15-16Page 4 GCR 2005
    • 5. Role of Unit Commissioners • Youth experience Scouting in units. Generally, the “healthier” the unit, the more wonderful things will happen for them in Scouting. • To help make this occur, the Boy Scouts of America provides unit service in which the commissioner is a key figure. • The commissioner helps chartered organizations and the leaders of their units achieve the objectives of Scouting. • The primary objective is to make good Scouting happen in the lives of youth members.Page 5 GCR 2005
    • 6. Role of Administrative Commissioners • Administrative commissioners include the council commissioner, assistant council commissioners, the district commissioner, and assistant district commissioners. • In the Zion District, ADCs include those serving as 2nd C. in stake presidencies; high councilmen over primary and young men; stake primary presidents and counselors over cubs; and stake young men presidencies. • The primary responsibilities of ADCs are recruiting, guiding, and evaluating the commissioner staff. • They are also to coach unit commissioners through unit problem solving situations.Page 6 GCR 2005
    • 7. Continuing Education • All commissioners should be involved in regular efforts to learn more about how they can best serve the units.Page 7 GCR 2005
    • 8. Continuing Education • Fast Start, Basic Training, and monthly District Commissioner Staff Meetings are a point of beginning. • National Commissioner Newsletter has useful ideas. • Local College of Commissioner Science in September of each year offers a variety of classes of your choosing.Page 8 GCR 2005
    • 9. Membership Management Discuss how to get boys and young men. Getting them initially • Membership in LDS units comes primarily from ward members. • Reaching out to friends and neighbors who are of a different faith is another way to expand the unit’s numbers. • An organized Fall and Spring Recruitment Rally to invite the non LDS is also within our reach. • If they are uncomfortable with an LDS unit, then we can offer to help the membership of the Community units.Page 9 Also see membership section of Commissioner Helps for packs, troops, teams, and crews. GCR 2005
    • 10. Membership Functions Under direction of Dist. Membership Chair • Fall & Spring Roundups of non-LDS Elementary Schools Intermediate and Middle Schools Special outreach to families in community - using ward mission leaders to identify candidates Offer them a choice of an LDS or Community unit • Spring and fall comparison of Church MLS list with BSA Registration list Register them as neededPage 10 GCR 2005
    • 11. Membership Management Discuss how to keep boys and young men. If they don’t like the program, they vote with their feet. • Quality program – This is the key to attracting and keeping them.  When the boys ask if they can bring a friend, you know a good program is being delivered. • Camp opportunities – Specific invitations to attend:  Cub and Webelos day camps  Scout & Varsity long-term camps  Venturing high adventure activities Also see membership section of Commissioner Helps for packs, troops, teams, and crews.Page 11 GCR 2005
    • 12. Unit Charter Renewal Process Discussion of rechartering process Note: Unit Commissioner should be involved in a majority of the steps, several weeks prior to rechartering. More information in Commissioner Fieldbook, pg. 38-47Page 12 GCR 2005
    • 13. Unit Charter Renewal Process Steps Involved How can the Unit Commissioner be of help? • By August 1: Council prepares rechartering packet. • By August 15 the Renewal Processors (Cub & Scouting Membership Chairs) should begin reviewing unit records for accuracy. • By September 1: Cub & Scouting Leaders hold separate Charter Renewal Meetings. A. Commissioner, Unit Committee Chair, and Membership Coordinators conduct membership inventories – contacting less active boys and inviting them to participate. B. Identify which adult positions need to be filled to be able to complete rechartering process. (Meet District Requirements) C. Identify which adults and boys need to register. D. Identify which adults require updating youth protection. E. Identify adults requiring completion of leader specific training. F. Begin contacting parents of 8-13 year olds for Boys Life subscriptions.Page 13 GCR 2005
    • 14. Unit Charter Renewal Process Additional Steps • In September Roundtable: training provided for Committee Chairs, and Membership Coordinators (Renewal Processors). • By October 1: A. Unit leaders, Unit Committee Chairs, and Unit Commissioners meet to determine the level of achievement with the Journey to Excellence program. • By October 15: Membership Coordinators (Processors) meet with Cub and Scout Unit Leaders, Committee Chairs, and Unit Commissioners, to go over rechartering details, provide answers to Membership Coordinators’ questions, and print out rechartering forms. • On Rechartering Night: A. CORs to join group from above for submittal of charter. B. Turn in packets, forms, & money for Boys’ Life. C. Turn in Journey to Excellence forms.Page 14 GCR 2005
    • 15. Charter Presentations • Receipt of Charter A. Usually available by February 1. • Cubs A. Presented at the next Pack Meeting to the Institutional Head. • Scouts/Varsity/Venturers A. Presented at the next Court of Honor to the Institutional Head.  To be presented simultaneously to all three units of each ward.  Should be presented by the Unit Commissioners as they are the only ones commissioned to interact with the unit.Page 15 GCR 2005
    • 16. Annual Commissioner Service Plan Gives specific purpose for some of your regular and supportive contact with unitsPage 16 See pg. 17 in Commissioner Fieldbook for more details GCR 2005
    • 17. The Lifesaving Commissioner • Sometimes a commissioner is called on to save the life of a unit. A. What are the ABCs of CPR?  Airway, Breathing, Circulation B. What are vital signs of a Scouting unit?  See Commissioner Fieldbook, pg. 28.Page 17 GCR 2005
    • 18. The Lifesaving Commissioner Watch for Vital Signs • No planned program • No youth leaders • No discipline UNIT • Unit stops meeting • Charter lapses • Only one adult active • No involvement of parents • Adult conflicts/poor communication These are the advanced stages of the Early Warning Signals which, had they been addressed, could have been corrected.Page 18 GCR 2005
    • 19. The Lifesaving Commissioner Specific things you can do: Consult your Asst. Dist. Comm. or Dist. Commissioner What are some basic questions to be asked? What must be solved? Possible alternatives? Which strategy first? Who to involve? Go into Be enthusiastic Action Apply “first aid” Fast Generate teamworkPage 19 GCR 2005
    • 20. The Lifesaving Commissioner Typical Hurry Cases and Possible Solutions New Leader lacks Training Help orient and provide information. Unit with Weak Leadership Counsel with unit leader. Counsel/encourage Chartered Organizational Rep. Unit with No or Insufficient Committee Work with Chartered Organizational Rep. to help him understand a committee’s importance. Unit Not Meeting Move quickly to salvage remaining leadership and membership. Unit with No New Members More information in Have patience. Move ins and convert families happen. Commissioner Fieldbook Neighborhood recruiting efforts have appeal. pg. 29-30 Ward boundaries do change.Page 20 GCR 2005
    • 21. Meaningful Unit Visits We have learned about dealing with units, their adult organization & functions, and the quality program. Visit Guidelines: •Wear your uniform when visiting a meeting with youth – be an example. •Stay in the background. •Alternate meetings visited. Unit meeting. Committee meeting. Youth planning meeting. Unit MeetingPage 21 GCR 2005
    • 22. Meaningful Unit Visits Additional Guidelines: •Visit with unit leaders & committee members. Make time for one-on-one. Establish two-way communications. Unit Committee Help should be made available with proper coaching by the unit commissioner in such a way that the unit leaders solve their own problems. •Attend unit events. •Promote: Training and Roundtables. District events. •Keep BSA goals and purposes in mind.Page 22 GCR 2005
    • 23. Review We have learned about: Different Commissioner Roles Membership Management Unit Charter Renewal Process Annual Commissioner Service Plan Commissioner Lifesaving Techniques Meaningful Unit VisitsPage 23 GCR 2005
    • 24. Summary As a leader, You are being asked to make a personal commitment.. …to Scouting ...of time, effort, and knowledge …of patience and understanding …to be a living example for unit leaders …to lend a helping hand to fellow Scouters.Page 24 GCR 2005
    • 25. Closing The Challenge- You now see your task: Training is just beginning – continue to gain knowledge (i.e. College of Commissioner Science each September). A Commissioner must be a friend to units – helpful, etc. The goal is more boys with a better Scouting experience. Help get the intended program delivered to the boys and young men.Page 25 GCR 2005
    • 26. Commissioning Ceremony As new Commissioners you have been duly selected and trained in Commissioner Basic Training. You are now to be Commissioned by Ken Marshall, Zion District Executive.Page 26 GCR 2005
    • 27. Thank you for completing the course!Page 27 GCR 2005

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