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Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
Titletown HDI  May 2009
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Titletown HDI May 2009

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Presentation and notes from the Titletown HDI local chapter meeting for May 2009. Main presentation - "How to talk to customers" by Chuck Tomasi

Presentation and notes from the Titletown HDI local chapter meeting for May 2009. Main presentation - "How to talk to customers" by Chuck Tomasi

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  • Transcript

    • 1. May’s Local Chapter Meeting Titletown HDI May 19, 2009
    • 2. Agenda Time Topic Person 5:30 PM Networking All 6:00 PM Welcome/Introductions All 6:10 PM Review Previous Meeting Notes President 6:20 PM Chapter News VP of Programs 6:30 PM How to Talk to Customers Chuck Tomasi 7:45 PM Q&A/Open Discussion All 8:00 PM Adjourn
    • 3. Welcome/Introductions
      • Your Name
      • Your Company and Position
      • Years of experience
      • SNOHKAY
    • 4. Ground Rules
      • Participation/communication
      • Electronics on “stun”
      • One at a time
      • Start/End on time
      • Agenda
      • Parking Lot
      • Be respectful
    • 5. April Meeting Minutes
      • President Bob Wery showed slides of the Las Vegas HDI National conference he attended April 6-9, 2009.  Two other Titletown HDI members also attended David Beau (AIG Travel Guard) and Holly Dezwark (Sargento Cheese).
      • Heidi Cummings, HDI Midwest Account Manager gave a presentation sharing some history and facts of HDI.  Her discussion continued with the different HDI certifications available and the benefits of certification.  Support center Maturity Assessment is another perk HDI offers showing a gap analysis of your strengths and weaknesses.
      • HDI certification if offered on-line or in the classroom.  One, two and three day class options are offered. Bob Wery anticipates offering the Support Center Analysis and Support Center Team Leader training in the fall and again in December.
      •  
    • 6. April Meeting Minutes Continued
      • Following Heidi's presentation the round table discussion on metrics offered members the opportunity to talk about what they keep track of and how frequent they survey the callers.
      • The second round table topic was on Malware and how it continues to burden most companies as hackers continually get more sophisticated in attempting to overrule firewalls and virus catcher software programs.  The majority agreed Malware Bytes does a pretty good job of catching things and  when not most companies are real good at quickly rebuilding the infected systems in less than an hour. 
      • The final topic of the round table was on scripts and how calls are documented.  Jamie Boucher (VP of Vendor Affairs) and Bob Wery (President) showed an excellent slide on the cost of escalating the call.
    • 7. Chapter News
      • Officer Positions Available
        • Newsletter
      • Local Chapter Officer Summit
        • June 5 – 7, 2009
        • Colorado Springs, CO.
      • Funds Balance = $764
      • No Summer Local Chapter Meeting
        • Officers will meet both June and July
    • 8. Chapter News Continued
      • New Sponsors
        • Fox Laser Toners
        • Environmental Innovations
      • Vendor Fair
        • November
      • Analyst of the Year & Manager of the Year
        • December
    • 9. Presentation
      • How to Talk to Customers
      • Chuck Tomasi
      • VP of Communication
      • Titletown HDI
    • 10. Chuck Tomasi
      • Home: Appleton WI
      • Father and Husband
      • IT Manager
      • Podcaster
      • Author
      • Group leader
    • 11. MAGIC Defined
      • M ake
      • A
      • G reat
      • I mpression on the
      • C ustomer
      • A truly positive and memorable customer experience
    • 12. Five MAGIC Steps
      • M ake a connection: Build the relationship
      • A ct Professionally: Express Confidence
      • G et to the heart of the matter: Listen/Ask
      • I nform and Clarify What You Will Do
      • C lose with the Relationship In Mind
    • 13. What does MAGIC mean?
      • Making the choice to be magic
      • Communicating with the customer in mind
      • Practical to the utmost
    • 14. Benefits Caring Creates Profits Why They Left % Death 1 A move or relocation 2 Salesperson relationship 4 Price and other relevant costs 11 Product dissatisfaction 14 Attitude of indifference from someone representing the company 68
    • 15. The Customer is Always… What?
      • Wrong!
      • Everyone is a customer
      • Every communication makes an impression
      • Customers are due respect
      • Do not have carte blanche to be abusive
      • Customers are still customers and have value
    • 16. Creating a Climate
      • Thermostat or Thermometer
      • Focus on what you can control
    • 17. Control Can Control Cannot Control My attitude Corporate policy How I use my time How customers react What I say and how I say it Volume of calls How I manage my workload Other departments My knowledge How I response to customers and collegues What I can do if I see something wrong or inappropriate
    • 18. What You Control
    • 19. First Impressions
      • M: Make a connection- Build the Relationship
    • 20. Exercise: The Greeting
      • Take five minutes
      • Find a partner
      • Exchange roles with your current greeting
      • Write them down
      • Rate them (1-5) on the following:
      Cheerful Good at his/her job Interested Self-assured Educated Trustworthy Friendly Intelligent Enthusiastic Impressive Polite Professional Kind Mature Pleasant
    • 21. Your Greeting Tone and Pace
    • 22. Empathy
      • Important for establishing the connection
      • Recognize and acknowledge their feelings
      • Key phrases:
        • “ I can understand how that could be upsetting”
        • “ I recognize that this is a difficult time for you”
        • “ I appreciate your patience”
        • “ I realize how important this is to you”
        • “ This sounds urgent. I can help you right now”
    • 23. Empathy
      • Not agreement
      • Establish or restore a relationship
      • Help you shorten service interactions
    • 24. Why we don’t empathize
      • It takes too long
        • You’ll take longer if they don’t think “you get it”
      • What if I don’t get it right?
        • Any attempt is generally appreciated
    • 25. Empathy – Unintended Messages Rep Says Subtle message received “ I’m sorry you feel that way.” “ It’s your own fault you feel that way – you really shouldn’t” I’m sorry you don’t understand the process” “ It’s perfectly clear to most people. I don’t know why you don’t get it.” “ I’m sorry to hear that.” Oh great – this means more work for me.” or “Here we go again.”
    • 26. The Name Game
      • Use the person’s name as soon as you hear it
      • If they offer – write it down
        • If it is difficult – ask for spelling or phonetic
      • If they don’t – ask at the first opportunity
      • Take care to use titles if offered (Dr., Rabbi, Mr.)
      • Try to avoid “Sir” or “Ma’am”.
    • 27. Offering Help
      • Particularly useful in a stressful situation
      • Assure the person you are there to help
      • Remember to ask for a name, then use it
      • Key phrases:
        • “ I can help you with that right now”
        • “ I can look in to that for you”
        • “ I’d be happy to help you”
        • “ I will take care of that for you”
      • MAGIC/postive words (happy, glad, etc)
    • 28. “ Help” Defined
      • Help is not the same as solving the problem
      • You are moving closer to a resolution
      • Now you can say “I can help you right now” with confidence
    • 29. Getting More Information
      • Asking permission – sounds like
        • “ To ensure accuracy, I’d like to ask a few more questions. Would that be OK?”
        • “ I’m sure I can help you with that. May I ask you a few questions first?”
        • “ The quickest way to help you is to get a little more information. Would that be alright?”
    • 30. Make a Connection: Build a Relationship
      • Greeting: Offer welcoming words
      • Greeting: Maintain an upbeat tone
      • Greeting: Use an unhurried pace
      • Listen and don’t interrupt
      • Express empathy through words
      • Express empathy through tone
      • Use the customer’s name as soon as you hear it
      • Tell the customer you will help
      • Ask permission to gain more information
    • 31. Acting Professionally
      • Use their name
      • Use “I”, not “we”
      • Use “please” and “thank you”
      • Avoid jargon
    • 32. What Makes it MAGIC?
      • They’re personal
        • Congratuations, offer additional help, names
      • They’re specific
        • Give a time and date and do it!
      • They’re empathetic (positive too)
        • “ You have been very patient. Thank you”
        • “ I’m so glad the software is working so well for you.”
    • 33. Tragic Phrases Tragic Phrase Implied Message As soon as possible When I get around to it I’ll try Not sure I can do it The truth is… I probably shouldn’t tell you this To be honest I was lying up until now Hopefully Who really knows? Maybe or Possibly I really have no idea
    • 34. Tragic Phrases
      • Avoid saying “We”
        • “ We’ll get that out to you.”
      • Slang
        • “ Yeah”, “Gotcha”, “You betcha”, “awesome”.
      • Jargon or acronyms
    • 35. Exercise: Tragic to Magic
      • “ You’ve got the wrong number.”
      • “ She’s not here right now.”
      • “ Our system can’t do that”
      • “ I’ll try to find the file”
      • “ Who’s calling?”
      • “ Obviously, you missed the deadline”
      • “ I’ll have to check with my supervisor”
    • 36. Act Professionally: Express Confidence
      • Express sincerity and helpfulness through tone
      • Maintain an appropriate pace
      • Speak clearly with proper volume
      • Use “I”, not “we”, when appropriate
      • Use “please” and “thank you” to show courtesy
      • Avoid tragic phrases and jargon
      • Use MAGIC phrases to build confidence and trust
    • 37. Voice Mail – Greeting
      • Standard message is fine
      • “ Hello, this is *. I’m in today by am unable to answer my phone right now, but if you leave your name, number and a message after the tone, I’ll return your call as soon as I can. If you would prefer to speak to an attendant, please press zero. Thank you and have a nice day.”
      • Set your personal greeting!
      • Use the temporary message
      • “ Please listen to the following message carefully. You have reached the voice mailbox of *. I am out of the office from/on (date), returning (date). I will (will not) be checking voice mail while I’m away. If you need immediate assistance, please press zero and have the operation page (alternate) at extension x, otherwise leave a message at the tone and I’ll get back to you when I return. Thank you and have a nice day.”
    • 38. Voice Mail – Leaving a Message
      • It’s still a conversation!
        • State your name and when you called
        • Briefly explain why you are calling
        • Say when it’s best to call back
        • Close like a pro
      • Example:
        • “ Hello, my name is Chuck Tomasi, from the IT Service Desk. It’s currently September 16 th , 2008 9:45 central. I’m calling to follow up on a ticket number 133456 you opened yesterday. I’d like to get a little more information about your printer options. Please call me at 555-123-4567 before 6:00PM. I look forward to helping you. Thank you.”
    • 39. Listening
    • 40. Listening
      • Most of us are at level 1 and 2
      • How to get to level 3?
        • Take a step back and recognize the customer
        • Listen for the meaning/big picture not the words
        • Be attentive: don’t interrupt, let them vent
        • Don’t judge
      • Why get to level 3?
        • Less stress
        • Helps move things along
      No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care
    • 41. Get to the Heart
    • 42. Ask Probing and Clarifying Qs
      • “ What are you specific concerns about the new software?”
      • “ What are you really looking for in a new laptop?”
      • “ Are you more concerned about saving time or reducing cost?”
      • “ Tell me exactly what’s happening with that tool and why it’s not working for you.”
      • “ Help me understand the impact of the challenge you’ve had with our services.”
    • 43. Rephrase and Repeat
      • Confirm or correct the understanding
      • Ensure accuracy of information
      • Repeat these:
        • Email addresses
        • Numbers with >3 digits or characters
        • New contact info (phone numbers, addresses)
        • Spelling of names
      • Don’t restate if you already have correct information.
    • 44. Transfers
      • Lead with a benefit (why)
      • Ask permission and wait for a response
      • Provide the name and number being contacted
      • Give the connecting party relevant information
      • Introduce the two parties if possible
      • Close with a professional phrase
        • “ I’m sure Sally can take care of you.”
        • “ It was a pleasure speaking with you.”
    • 45. Hostile Example
      • Express empathy
        • “ Mr. Adams I understand the urgency, and I will help you right now.”
      • Ask permission
        • “ Mr. Adams, to help you quickly, I will need to ask a few questions. Is that OK?”
      • Ask probing and clarifying questions
        • “ Mr. Adams, what did you order and when did you expect to receive it?”
      • Rephrase and repeat
    • 46. Hold Please
      • Lead with a benefit (why)
      • Ask permission and wait for a response
      • After the hold, say the person’s name and thank them for holding
      • Example:
      • “ I’m going to need to look up some records. This may take a minute. Do you mind while I put you on hold for just a minute?”
      • “ David, thank you for holding. I have the information now. Are you ready?”
    • 47. Tragic Hold Phrases Avoid These Hold on… Hang on a sec… Hold please… Mind if I put you on hold? I’m going to have to put you on hold
    • 48. Getting to the Heart of the Matter
      • Ask questions to find the catchpoint (what/why)
      • Listen and rephrase appropriately
      • Repeat numbers (>3) and new contact info
      • Explain why and get permission before a hold or transfer
      • After the hold: Use the customer’s name, wait for a response, and thank him/her
      • Keep the interaction to an appropriate length
    • 49. Inform and Clarify
    • 50. Inform and Clarify
      • If you get anything other than positive agreement:
        • Hear them out
        • Restate your next step and why you feel it’s best
        • Explore other options and time frames
    • 51. Inform and Clarify
      • Be proactive: Offer options and solutions
      • Set a deadline or time frame before the customer asks
      • Educate with relevant information
      • Be knowledgeable and accurate
      • Summarize the next step(s)
      • Get the customer’s agreement on the next step(s)
    • 52. Close with the Relationship in Mind
      • Make a last offer to help
        • “ Is there anything else I can help you with today?”
        • May not be appropriate if you’ve transferred the call
        • You were unable to help for whatever reason
      • Use the customer’s name
      • End with a MAGIC phrase
        • “ Thank you for calling, Jeff. Have a nice day.”
      • Close with a sincere tone.
      • Did you lead the interaction closer to resolution?
    • 53. Follow Through
      • Review your notes
        • Critical points
        • Important pieces of information
        • Action items
      • Identify what you and the caller agreed would happen next
      • Note the time frames and next steps
      • Set your schedule accordingly
      • Keep the caller informed as necessary
    • 54. Follow Through
      • Let the caller know if problems arise
      • Keep the caller informed if things move faster than anticipated
      • Remain proactive
      • Look for opportunities for additional service
    • 55. Complaints
      • At least their saying something!
        • 96% just leave
      • Dissatisfied customers tell ~10 people
      • Merely listening boosts chances of retention
      • 95% of satisfied complainers remain loyal
    • 56. Exercise: Identify your Hot Buttons
      • Examples:
        • Someone rolling their eyes
        • Demanding words and tone
        • Condescending manner
        • Someone snapping at you
        • Someone blaming you
        • Someone who insists on speaking to a supervisor
        • Someone who needs extensive help
        • Someone who tells you their life story
      • How do you react?
        • Angry, upset, worried, sad, defensive, frustrated?
    • 57. Emotional Response
    • 58. Changing Your Responses
      • Auto Pilot/Conditioned Responses
      • Fight: It’s not your fault, shifting the blame.
      • Flight: You check out. It doesn’t matter to you.
      • Freeze: You do nothing at all.
    • 59. Internal Stop Signs
    • 60. Putting Choice in to Practice
      • Start upbeat and helpful
      • Remember empathy
        • “ I can hear how upset you are, Bob. I’m here to help.”
      • Use the customer’s name as soon as possible
      • Make it clear that you intend to help
    • 61. Defusing Irate and Abusive Callers
      • Don’t take it personally
      • Watch the tone of your voice – BE RATIONAL
      • If they continue, use their name and explain what you can do
        • “ Sara, I know this is difficult. I assure you that I’m here to help.”
      • If the abuse continues, explain you can’t do anything if they continue to behave in that manner.
        • “ Mr. Letterbaum, I’d like to help you. If you continue to yell and use profanity, I’ll have no choice, but to end this call.”
    • 62. Rambling Callers
      • Politely Interrupt
      • Ask how you can help
      • Be specific to address the catchpoint
      • Summarize, then say what you’ll do
      • Remember, interrupting is not only suitable, but a must.
    • 63. Delivering Bad News
      • The Bad News Burger
        • Top bun: Empathize appropriately given the situation
        • Meat: Deliver the bad news
        • Bottom bun: End on a positive note, such as additional empathy or help.
    • 64. Bad News: Example
      • “ Mr. Rodriguez, I understand how important it is for you to get your login ID.
      • Unfortunately, I reviewed our regulations policy and found that we cannot issue you one.
      • I know that’s not the answer you were looking for. Perhaps at some point in the future this policy will change.”
    • 65. Bottom Line: Restoring the Relationship
      • You’ll gain (or regain) control of the situation
      • You’ll shorten and focus your interactions with the caller
      • You’ll lower the stress associated with the call
      • You’ll boost your own confidence in the service you provide as well as in your ability to handle challenging callers.
    • 66. Thank You
      • Reference Material:
        • How to talk to customers
          • Diane Berenbaum/Tom Larkin
        • 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
          • Steven R. Covey
    • 67. Open Discussion
      • What’s on your mind?
    • 68. Adjourn
      • Thank you!

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