Auxiliary Review 2.2
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Auxiliary Review 2.2

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Auxiliary Review 2.2 Auxiliary Review 2.2 Presentation Transcript

  • Verb Type
    • • Main verbs
    • – Express action, occurrence or state of being
          • Julie studies English. She is a student.
    • • Auxiliary verbs
    • – Accompany the verb and show person, number, or tense, etc.
        • do, be, have
          • I'm leaving now. I've finished my work. I don't need to stay.
        • modal verbs (must, can, etc.)
          • George can speak French.
          • They must study more.
    • • To do
      • Not normally used in affirmative sentences using simple verb tenses
      • (Simple present and Simple past)
      • I like tennis. I played it yesterday.
      • Used in questions , short answers and negatives of simple verb tenses
        • • Do you speak English? Yes, I do .
        • • Does your sister speak English? No, she doesn’t .
        • • Didn’t she learn it in school? No, she didn’t take English
        • as a foreign language. She studied French.
        • • Did you study French also? No, my sister did but I didn’t .
      • Notice that after the auxiliaries do, does, did ,
      • the base form of the verb is used .
    Auxiliary Verbs
    • To be
      • – Used to form the continuous aspect of verbs.
        • The main verb in the -ing form will come after the auxiliary.
        • (Present continuous, past continuous, present perfect continuous)
            • Jeffrey is coming over for dinner.
            • Sharon was preparing a turkey.
            • They have been working for hours.
      • – Used to form the passive voice .
        • The main verb always appears after the auxiliary,
        • but when forming the passive voice,
        • the past participle form of the main verb is used.
            • Math 101 is taught by Mrs. Zircon.
            • The cake was made this morning.
    • To be
      • Used for affirmatives, questions , short answers and negatives of
      • both continuous and passive forms.
        • Are you going to bed now?
        • What were they doing last night?
        • Are the mistakes made by the students common?
        • What was he given for his birthday?
  • • To have
    • Used to form the perfect aspect of verbs.
    • Used in all perfect sentences:
        • affirmatives, questions , short answers and negatives
        • – Have you ever gone parachuting?
        • – Yes, I have and so has my brother, but my boyfriend hasn’t because he’s scared of heights.
        • – Had you considered parachuting for a long time
        • before you went the first time?
        • – No, I hadn’t. I hadn’t thought about it at all before I went.
          • My brother had gone several times, and he talked me
          • into going with him for lessons.
    • • Notice that after the auxiliary to have,
      • the past participle form of the main verb is used.
    • Modal verbs
      • Used to give meaning to the main verb, related to:
            • Certainty
            • Obligation
            • Necessity
            • Expectation
            • Freedom to act
      • Followed by the base form of the verb
      • Used for affirmatives, questions , short answers and negatives
        • Could you pass me the ketchup?
        • What must you do to get service here?
    • Modal verbs – modal-like expressions
      • Used in the same way as modals:
          • Certainty
          • Obligation
          • Etc.
      • But they are formed with the auxiliary to be:
        • Be expected to
        • Be required to
        • Be supposed to
      • Certain verbs also work like modals in that they add meaning to the verb:
        • Used to
        • Need to
      • In questions, short answers and negative form, they
      • work with the auxiliary do/does/did .