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Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
Law Enforcement Role In Computing
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Law Enforcement Role In Computing

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Law Enforcement Role in Computer Investigations
    • 2.  
    • 3. History of the Computer...
      • UNIVAC
      • UNIVAC evolved into main frame computer
      • Phone Phreaks emerged
      • 1951
      • 1960 – 1970
      • 1954
    • 4. History of the Computer...
      • Popular Science magazine showed plans for a “personal” computer
      • Apple Computer premiered during Super Bowl commercial
      • Progression from 8086 & 8088 chips running from 8 MHz to 450+ MHz
      • 1970 (Mid)
      • 1981
      • 1980-1990
    • 5. First Criminal Case?
      • First computer crime case was reported in what year?…
      1958
    • 6. What are the Crimes?
      • What is the most committed computer crime?
        • Financial Crimes
      • What is the most common case worked by investigators?
      -Child Pornography
    • 7. How Much is Being Report?
      • Less than 10% of computer crimes are reported!
    • 8. Confirmed Intrusions - 1997...
      • 1997 - 1,134 confirmed instances of intrusions…
        • Affected approx 150,000 systems in 1997
        • > 10% of intrusions are detected (?)
    • 9. What If?
      • What if all the intrusions were reported?
        • <200,000 instances of intrusion in 1997
        • How many computers?
    • 10. Impact on Law Enforcement…
      • Automobile accelerated and decentralized crime by creating the mobile criminal
      • The computer chip compounded the problem -
        • remoteness from crime scene
        • anonymity
        • data encryption
    • 11. Computers are Involved in Three Types of Crimes...
      • Target of the Crime -
        • Theft of long-distance service
        • Computer and component theft
        • System Intrusion
        • Cellular phone cloning
        • Software Piracy
        • Software theft
    • 12. Computers are Involved in Three Types of Crimes...
      • Instrument of the Crime -
        • Solicitation of minors
        • Harassment/Stalking
        • Prescription Fraud
        • Credit Card Fraud
        • Counterfeiting
    • 13. Computers are Involved in Three Types of Crimes...
      • Repository of Information -
        • Fraud/Embezzlement
        • Pornography
        • Narcotics
        • Traditional Crimes
    • 14. Unique Electronic Crime Scene..
      • Electronic crime scene is very fragile
      • Electronic evidence can be stored on -
        • Computer
        • Digital answering machine
        • Pager
        • Fax machine
    • 15. Unique Electronic Crime Scene...
      • Traditional Physical Evidence –
        • Spent bullets
        • Broken glass
        • Pry marks
    • 16. Unique Electronic Crime Scene...
      • Electronic Data is Ambient –
        • Static electricity
        • Dust
        • Heat
        • Magnetic fields
    • 17. Hiding the Evidence...
      • Physical evidence may be thrown away but usually is retrievable
      • Computer data can be encrypted
      • Steganography –
      -Allows data to be hidden inside a graphic
    • 18. Transfer Theory of Evidence...
      • A criminal will always take something from and leave something behind, however minute or transitory, from any crime scene
      • How does this apply to a network intrusion?
        • The Key - no PHYSICAL evidence
    • 19. Futurists Predict...
      • “By the year 2000, there will be so much computer related crime, law enforcement will be reduced to taking reports because we will not know how to investigate.”
        • Dr. William Tafoya 1988 and 1997
    • 20. The Future...
      • Electronic devices have lead to a level of New Age Crime.
      • Internet fraud is rapidly expanding
      • Training and equipment become quickly outdated.
    • 21. Forensic Investigators v. Computer Crime Investigators?
      • Analyst v. Forensics
      OR OR OR
      • On-line Investigations v Forensics
      • Pro-active v. Re-active
    • 22. State Statutes...
    • 23. Civilian v. Law Enforcement Officer?
      • Law Enforcement-Positive…
        • Good Training
        • High Case Load (Lots of experience)
      • Law Enforcement-Negative…
        • Poor Training
        • High Case Load (Too much work)
        • Low Pay
    • 24. Civilian v. Law Enforcement Officer?
      • Civilian-Positive…
        • Exciting work
        • Good Pay
      • Civilian-Negative…
        • Poor pay
        • High Stress
        • Equipment/Training Costs
    • 25. How Does Private Industry Keep Up? How Can the Police Keep Up? How Does Anybody Keep Up?
    • 26. Equipment Issues...
      • Hardware - $5000 to $10,000
      • Software - $5000 to $10,000
      $
    • 27. Seizure v. Not Seizing...
      • Time?
      • Environment?
      • Seizure Time?
    • 28. Network v. Desktop
    • 29. Multi-Jurisdictional Issues...
      • City
      • County
      • State
      • Federal
    • 30. Civil V. Criminal...
      • The Hypothetical Widget Company
    • 31. Forensics v. Analyst...
      • What is the best description of a computer forensics unit?
        • Crime Lab?
        • Analyst?
    • 32. Pro-Active Investigative Issues...
      • Were do we start?
    • 33. History of Computer Forensics...
      • DOS Rules!
      • GUI is Best!
      • Stand Alones are the only thing we will touch!
      • MAC – Ouch!
      • LINUX/UNIX – Double Ouch!
    • 34. Search Warrant Issues...
      • What is a container?
      • What is the best description for a computer?
        • Filing Cabinet?
    • 35. Legal Issues...
      • Case Law is being written as we speak
        • Don’t be apart of bad-case law
      • Child Pornography v. Nudist Camp
      • Is viewing actually possession?
      • Can we take a business down because of a bad employee?
    • 36. State Issues to Pro-Active Investigations...
      • Two-party consent
      • E-Mail
      • Voice Mail
    • 37. Federal Issues...
      • WHERE’S THE MONEY?
    • 38. Defense Issues…
      • Evidence Seized
      • Training of police at search warrant
      • Training of computer forensic examiner
    • 39. Report Types...
    • 40. COMPUTER FORENSICS UNIT
    • 41. History of the Computer Forensics Unit
      • 1987 - Crime Analysis Unit
        • 6 Full Time Employees
      • 1993 - Technical Support Unit
        • 3 Full Time Employees
        • 1 National Guard Employee
    • 42. History of the Computer Forensics Unit
      • 1995 - Investigative Support Unit
        • 2 Full Time Detectives
        • 1 National Guard
      • 1997 – Computer Forensics Unit
        • 2 Full Time Detectives
        • 1 National Guard
    • 43. History of the Computer Forensics Unit
      • 1998 - Computer Forensics Unit
        • 1 Full Time Detective
        • 1 National Guard Employee
    • 44. History of the Computer Forensics Unit
      • Today - Computer Forensics Unit
        • 1 Full Time Detective
    • 45. The Future...
      • Renamed to the Computer Crimes Unit
        • 1 Full Time Sergeant
        • 2 Full Time Detectives
    • 46. Case Load - 1998
      • 40 Forensic Examinations
      • 63 Computers (83 Partitions)
      • 1200 Diskettes, Tapes & CD’s
      2.5 GB Per Case (HD Only)
    • 47. Case Load - 1999
      • 55+ Forensic Examinations to Date
      4.8 GB Per Case (HD Only)
    • 48. Case Type
      • Homicide
      • Suicide
      • Arson
      • Stalking
      • Fraud
      • Narcotics
    • 49. Case Type
      • Child Pornography
      • Child Solicitation
      • Administrative Investigations -
        • Deleting files
        • Personal Use
        • Misuse of State/County/City Equipment
        • Pornography
    • 50. Cases of Interest
      • Embezzlement Case
        • $750,000 found in deleted file
      • Child Pornography Investigations
        • 44,000+ Images
    • 51.  
    • 52.  
    • 53.  
    • 54. Equipment
      • Computers
        • 5 - 266 to 450 MHz, Pentium II Machines
          • 20 SCSI Hard Drives
        • 3 - Lap Tops
    • 55.  
    • 56. Equipment
      • Peripherals
        • 4 - Zip Plus Drives
        • 2 - Two GB Jaz Drives
        • 1 - One GB Jaz Drive
        • 2 - Syjet Drives
        • 1 - Ezflyer Drive
    • 57. Equipment
      • Tape Drives
        • 2 - Wangdat Drives
        • 3 - Conner Drives
        • 1 - Ditto Drive
    • 58. Equipment
      • CD Drives
        • 5 - CD ROM’s
        • 1 - CDR
    • 59. Equipment
      • 1/2 Terabytes of storage capacity
    • 60.  
    • 61. Summary Slide
      • How Much is Being Report?
      • Computers are Involved in Three Types of Crimes...
      • Transfer Theory of Evidence...
      • Forensic Investigators v. Computer Crime Investigators?
      • Civilian v. Law Enforcement Officer?
    • 62. Experts?
      • Civilians
      • Police
        • What about reports?
    • 63. Scenario 1
      • Kid Missing!
    • 64. Scenario 2
      • Pro-active Internet Investigation
    • 65. How it Works...
    • 66. What is Needed?
      • Search Warrant
      • Affidavit
      • Key Words
      • CPU
      • Diskettes
      • CD’s
      • Zip/Jaz Disks
    • 67.  
    • 68.  
    • 69. Duplicate Image... Suspect’s Computer WSP Computer
    • 70.  
    • 71.  
    • 72.  
    • 73.  
    • 74.  
    • 75.  
    • 76.  
    • 77.  
    • 78.  
    • 79.  
    • 80.  
    • 81.  
    • 82.  
    • 83.  
    • 84.  
    • 85.  
    • 86.  
    • 87. Liability...
      • Police officers must execute search warrants to avoid unnecessary destruction of property. Departments risk liability for failing to properly train officers proper procedures for searching and seizing computer evidence.
        • Ginter v. Stallcu, 869 F 2d 384 (1998)
        • Tarpley v. Green, 684 F.2d 1 (1982)
    • 88. Evidence Handling
      • Look for hidden passwords!
    • 89. Resources on the Internet...
      • Federal Guidelines for Searching and Seizing Computers
        • www.usdoj.gov/criminal/cybercrime
    • 90. Other Resources...
      • Training
        • City U
        • CTIN
        • IACIS
        • SEARCH
        • National White Collar Crime Center
    • 91. On Going Issues...
      • Staffing
      • Education
      • Equipment
      • Training
    • 92. Where Are We Going?
      • WSP – Computer Crime Unit
      • Federal Task Forces
    • 93. Who to Contact...
      • Sergeant Jim Faust
      • Detective Steve Beltz
      360-753-3277
    • 94.  
    • 95.  

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