Ken Lohento - Presentation of ARDYIS Activities

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  • 1. Presentationof ARDYIS activitiesby Ken Lohento, ICT ProgrammeCoordinator, CTA Johannesburg, 20 May 2012
  • 2. CTA : Who we are• 50 staff from 27 countries • 26 years of commitment to• CTA is a joint institution of the advancing agriculture and ACP and the EU (Cotonou rural communities in ACP Agreement). • Key role for partners26 years of commitment to advancing agriculture and rural communities in ACP
  • 3. CTA’s Mission• To  advance food and nutritional security  increase prosperity  encourage sound natural resource management• via  providing access to information and knowledge,  facilitating policy dialogue and  strengthening the capacity of agricultural and rural development institutions and communities in ACP countries
  • 4. Strategic Goals• To support well informed, inclusive agricultural policy processes and strategies that empower smallholder producers, women and youth• To promote the development of priority value chains, especially for smallholder producers• To strengthen the information, communication and knowledge management capacities of institutions and networks : ICT
  • 5. The CTA ICTProgramme
  • 6. Str ate g y goal 3 (IC-T, KM) themes & activities Increased focus on electronic content generation Promoting and supporting use of innovative ICT tools and approaches Building skills of ACP partners Promoting information, communication and knowledge management policies & strategies CTA all goals cross-cutting theme : Youth and Gender
  • 7. ICTs : huge opportunities for agricultural value chains • Market information service (MIS)• Growth is linked to ICTs provides price information and a in developing countries virtual marketplace for buyers (except in countries and sellers of agricultural with restricted commodities (Esoko, RESIMAO) telecoms) UNCTAD 2011  crowd-sourcing for pest • Every 10 percentage-point control (e.g. PestNet, increase in high-speed Internet Pacific)  mobile financial services connections there is an increase (M-PESA, Kenya) in economic growth of 1.3 percentage points (World Bank).
  • 8. Capacity building across ACP
  • 9. Focussing onyouth andARDYIS Project
  • 10. Who are youth? For the United Nations, youth are understood as In recognition of the age people aged between 15 range where life transitions and 24 take place, the African Union has adopted a broader definition of youth that encompasses individualsTaking into account young aged between 15 and 35.farmers issues and (in the African Youtheconomic challenged by Charter)ACP youth, CTA has sofar considered as Youthpeople aged between 15and 35 years, like in theAfrican Youth Charter
  • 11. Some data on youthMore than 20% of youth inAfrica have between 15 to24 72% of the youth population(UN definition) live with lessthan $2 a day (ILO 2006) The 2009 ILO report on « In 2005, 62% of Africa’s Global Employment Trendsoverall population fell below » notes that thethe age of 25 (World Bank vulnerable employment2008) – if we consider the rate in Sub-Saharan Africayouth age limit up to 35, this was 74.7% in 2007statistic is higer
  • 12. • Agriculture (30% to 50% of ACP GDP for many economies), needs youth  Surveys among CaFAN farmers’ organizations across the region indicate that the average age of farmers are increasing and in most cases above 45 years old, the majority being over 60 years” (Jethro Greene, CAFAN)• Youth needs agriculture  Agriculture is in many ACP country the main job provider  Agriculture related job are diverse, from to production to commercialisation, to provision of services, etc.• CTA new strategy states that:  CTA will continue to support activities that encourage youth in ACP countries to consider agriculture as a viable career path.
  • 13. Who are youth? For the United Nations, youth are understood as In recognition of the age people aged between 15 range where life transitions and 24 take place, the African Union has adopted a broader definition of youth that encompasses individualsTaking into account young aged between 15 and 35.farmers issues and (in the African Youtheconomic challenged by Charter)ACP youth, CTA has sofar considered as Youthpeople aged between 15and 35 years, like in theAfrican Youth Charter
  • 14. Some data on youthMore than 20% of youth inAfrica have between 15 to24 72% of the youth population(UN definition) live with lessthan $2 a day (ILO 2006) The 2009 ILO report on « In 2005, 62% of Africa’s Global Employment Trendsoverall population fell below » notes that thethe age of 25 (World Bank vulnerable employment2008) – if we consider the rate in Sub-Saharan Africayouth age limit up to 35, this was 74.7% in 2007statistic is higer
  • 15. CTA Youth initiatives• ARDYIS project• Developing youth in agriculture policies (FANRPAN project; SPC in the Pacific)• Encouraging young scientists/professionals in agriculture• Supporting youth in various activities • CTA covered the attendance of many youths to conferences : Ex; African Young Scientists Initiative on Climate Change and Indigenous Knowledge (AYSICC) conference organized by NEPAD • Young farmers are part of targets of various CTA supported projects • Youths form an important part of beneficiaries of CTA Web 2.0 • Etc.
  • 16. Promoting opportunities foryouth in agriculture and ICTs
  • 17. Agriculture, Youth and ICTs• “We recommend that our skills to learn new technologies are properly valued, particularly in using ICTs” – Declaration of rural youths participating during the IFAD Farmers’ Forum, 18 February 2012, (Italy)• “There is considerable scope for encouraging youth participation in ICT as a way of supporting agricultural business ventures” (dixit PafPNET/SPC)• Youth spearhead innovation in Agriculture and ICTs
  • 18. 1 of 4ARDYIS – launched in 2010 ARD and Youth in the Information SocietyStrengthen capacities on ICTs forARDContribute to sensitising onAgriculture and RD issuesTarget audience  young farmers  students in agricultural training courses  all interested youthPartners CAFAN SPC Yam Pukri
  • 19. 2 of 4 Key Achievements Dissemination of information: (opportunities, etc.) and discussions(Facebook page, website, dedicated mailing lists) +700 facebookmembers Training Web 2.0 training for ARD for 25 selected youth from ACPregions and Consultation on youth, ICT and agriculture (future)
  • 20. Achievements Facilitation of the production of an advocacy document calling for stronger support for youth involvement in agriculture and ICT6 key recommendations addressed to policy makersand ACP/EU/international institutionsEndorsed and promoted by partner organizations andyouthsPromoted to key people/organizations(on going)Full title cited on hundred of web pages/sites (En/Fr)Consulted 4600+ times on Ardyis website
  • 21. AchievementsOthers : In 2010: essaycompetition : about 180entries; 2011 : NEPAD andCTA essay About 3000 comments/and votes!
  • 22. Production of a Achievementspublication “EmergingVoices in ICT andAgriculture”Supported youthparticipation in Ag and ICTconferences (IAALD,water management, etc.)Some youth found jobopportunities
  • 23. Future• Proper CTA Youth strategy development• Supporting youth project• Focus on:  Improving youth opportunties in rural areas using ICT  Using ICT to enhance youth involvement in agriculture
  • 24. Thank you