Fall 2011 art 1 narrative portrait project artists

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These three artists inspired out Narrative Portrait project.

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Fall 2011 art 1 narrative portrait project artists

  1. 1. Art 1
  2. 2.  Bosch produced several triptychs. Among his most famous is The Garden of Earthly Delights. He was from the Netherlands and was part of the Northern Renaissance. Bosch is also one of the most revolutionary draftsmen in the history of art, producing some of the first distinctive sketches in Northern Europe.
  3. 3.  Did not want to be expected to create “Indian Art” “I did not find an interest in drawing traditional American Indian cultural icons. If I did, I changed a lot of the images and made them more intricate and interesting.” “I wanted to create my own art on a new level and steer clear of the old traditional Indian style of art.” -Star Wallowing Bull
  4. 4.  Creator & Illustrator of Where’s Waldo books "My earliest influences were cinema epics and playing with toy soldiers. I attempted to recapture the excitement in my drawings, which started out as crowds of crude stick figures." -Martin Handford Martin was asked to create a book showcasing his talent, and the character Waldo was born to provide a link between each scene. "That’s who Waldo is - an afterthought," he says. "As it turns out, the fans were more interested in the character than in the crowd scenes."
  5. 5.  As an artist Martins Wheres Waldo books have been immensely successful  43 million copies worldwide  33 countries  22 languages. "I can’t tell you how pleased I am that Waldo has taken on a life of his own, I’d like to inspire children--to open their minds to explore subjects more--to just be aware of what’s going on around them. I’d like them to see wonder in places that might not have occurred to them."

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