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Livestock-Climate Change CRSP Annual Meeting 2011: Mali Poultry Project Update (M. Lacy)
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Livestock-Climate Change CRSP Annual Meeting 2011: Mali Poultry Project Update (M. Lacy)

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An update on the Livestock-Climate Change CRSP's Mali Poultry Project and project status report. Presentation given by M. Lacy (University of Georgia) at the Livestock-Climate Change CRSP Annual ...

An update on the Livestock-Climate Change CRSP's Mali Poultry Project and project status report. Presentation given by M. Lacy (University of Georgia) at the Livestock-Climate Change CRSP Annual Meeting, Golden, CO, April 26-27, 2011.

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    Livestock-Climate Change CRSP Annual Meeting 2011: Mali Poultry Project Update (M. Lacy) Livestock-Climate Change CRSP Annual Meeting 2011: Mali Poultry Project Update (M. Lacy) Presentation Transcript

    • Mali Poultry Project
      Jack Houston
      Catherine Keske
      Mike Lacy
    • Purpose
      Enhance income of women
      Improve nutrition of children
      Reduce impact of climate change
      Make poultry production efficient
    • Poultry Production in Mali
      95% “village” chicken
      Disease
      Nutrition, husbandry, genetics
      50% mortality
      6 months to 1 kg
    • Newcastle Disease
      Viral disease, resp., intest., neur.
      Affects poultry worldwide
      Vaccine problems in West Africa
    • Supply and demand
      Marketing
      Infrastructure
      Potential for improvements
      Challenges and opportunities
    • Challenges
      Flock philosophy
      Bank account
      Eggs – replication
      Death inevitable
      Crop philosophy
      Grow, sell, grow, sell, … invest
      Domestic source of chicks
    • Opportunities
      Chick stock
      Disease prevention
      Housing
      Nutrition
      Management
      Marketing – flock versus crop
      Allied services
      Capacity building, educational, coops, etc.
    • Egg production andMeat production
    • Nutrition
      Vitamin A 24%
      Fe 25%
      Choline 25%
      Calcium 13%
      Phosphorous
      Vitamin B12
      Selenium
    • Nutrition
      Dancing with Skeletons – K. Dettwyler
      Protein deficit
      22 grams for children 4-8 yrs
      56 grams for teenagers
      71 grams for pregnant women
      One egg = 31 grams quality protein
    • Nutrition
      Dancing with Skeletons – K. Dettwyler
      Protein deficit
      10 grams for infants
      22 grams for children 4-8 yrs
      56 grams for teenagers
      71 grams for pregnant women
      One egg = 31 grams quality protein
    • Nutrition
      Dancing with Skeletons – K. Dettwyler
      Protein deficit
      22 grams for children 4-8 yrs
      56 grams for teenagers
      71 grams for pregnant women
      One egg = 31 grams quality protein
    • Nutrition
      Dancing with Skeletons – K. Dettwyler
      Protein deficit
      22 grams for children 4-8 yrs
      56 grams for teenagers
      71 grams for pregnant women
      One egg = 31 grams quality protein
    • Nutrition“Automatic for the People”
    • Climate Change
      Concentration/management of manure
      Adaptability of poultry to varied climates
      Diversification of livestock types
      Stimulation of cereal grain production
    • Climate Change
      Concentration/management of manure
      Adaptability of poultry to varied climates
      Diversification of livestock types
      Stimulation of cereal grain production
    • Climate Change
      Concentration/management of manure
      Adaptability of poultry to varied climates
      Diversification of livestock types
      Stimulation of cereal grain production
    • 1800’s
      The 1st census to count poultry was in 1880. It recorded 102 million chickens in the US.
      These were small flocks of chickens often used to provide those legendary farm breakfasts. Any additional eggs produced would provide the necessary spending money for the women in the family.
      It was a deceptively large business due to the high % of farms that kept chickens.
    • 1800’s
      Tending chickens took practically no time and often it was the women of the house who were the caretakers.
      Considered all profit the only cash outlay being the cost of the chicks and wire to repair the pens.
      The chicken business was a sideline.
    • 1900-1940
      Fittingly, a woman, Mrs. Wilma Steele is considered a pioneer in the poultry industry.
      1923, 500 chickens, $0.62 per pound.
      1924, 1000 chickens, $0.57 per pound.
      1925, Mr. S. quit his job to work for Mrs. S.
      By 1934 seven million meat type chickens were being grown on the Delmarva peninsula.
    • History of Poultry
      European breed, small, aggressive, flighty
    • History of Poultry
      When we talk about the history and development of the poultry industry we are talking about an American agricultural success story.
    • Jesse Jewell
      Jesse Jewel’s mother owned a feed mill in Gainesville, Georgia.
      Struggling because farmers were too poor to buy feed.
      So Jesse gave chicks and feed to farmers and when they were grown the farmer kept a portion of the flock for his labor. Jesse received the rest as payment for the feed and chicks.
      Chickens were shipped for processing.
      Jessie decided to have the hatchery and processors closer to home ->Vertical Integration.
    • Chickens in Georgia
      Broilers 1.4 billion birds/yr
      $13 billion /yr
      Breeders 13 million birds/yr 1.5 billion/yr
      Layers 3 billion eggs/yr $600 million/yr
      100,000 Georgia jobs
    • 1800’s
      It was not until late in the 19th century that poultry received recognition as an integral part of agriculture.
      During the 1870’s and 1880’s the increasing market demands for poultry focused attention on utility type fowls.
      Plymouth Rock
      American Brahma
      American Leghorn
    • 1900’s
      The majority of agricultural leaders in the early 1900’s never thought poultry would develop as an industry.
      The farm experts reckoned that you could not compete with a system in which labor was free, feed was free, and the farm wife was counting on the chickens for her spending money.
    • Early Poultry Industry
      Compared to the rest of the nation, Georgia was not a major poultry area before 1920.
      The boll weevil swept through Georgia’s cotton in 1920.
      In South Georgia farmers turned to peanuts and tobacco.
      In the mountains and foothills of North Georgia farmers were literally starving, depleted soil, hilly terrain, small farms.
    • Today’s Industry
      Jewell’s “vertical integration” spread throughout Georgia and the South.
      Georgia and Southern states were able to produce and sell for less than other areas.
      Jesse Jewell set the mold for which today’s poultry industry is based.
    • Chickens in Georgia
      Broilers 1.4 billion birds/yr
      $13 billion /yr
      Breeders 13 million birds/yr 1.5 billion/yr
      Layers 3 billion eggs/yr $600 million/yr
      100,000 Georgia jobs
    • Chickens in Industry
      Broiler—meat type chicken
      W. Plymouth Rock and Cornish
      Layer—egg producer
      European
    • This presentation was made possible by the United States Agency for International Development Bilateral Mission in Mali and the generous support of the American people through Grant No. 688-A-00-10-00131-00.The opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the U.S. Agency for International
      Development or the U.S. government.