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Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100
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Chapter 6 Part 1 Cst100

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  • 1. Chapter 6 Nonverbal Communication
  • 2. Nonverbal Communication <ul><li>Communicating without using words much of which is unintentional </li></ul>
  • 3. Communicating Effectively <ul><li>Nonverbal communication plays an important role in communication </li></ul><ul><li>If you are unaware or miss noverbals, you are very likely to miss a part or the entire message </li></ul><ul><li>Nonverbals are very complex </li></ul><ul><li>No two communications can be the same as a result of nonverbals </li></ul>
  • 4. Differences Between Verbal and Nonverbal <ul><li>There is a huge difference between how the brain processes verbal and nonverbal information </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal is very linear – all in a line, one after another in order </li></ul><ul><li>Nonverbals are taken in all together and then a general impression is made from the nonverbals received </li></ul>
  • 5. Nonverbal Communication <ul><li>Nonverbals are learned through your upbringing and through imitation </li></ul><ul><li>Nonverbals are largely unconscious and hard to suppress so at times they may conflict with verbal – which is more believable? </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed messages – verbals and nonverbals contradict each other </li></ul>
  • 6. Types of Nonverbal Communication <ul><li>Paralanguage – HOW you say things </li></ul><ul><li>Paralinguistic cues can often set strong impressions for others and are often remembered longer than WHAT you said </li></ul><ul><li>Rate – speed; can effect the message. Faster speakers are seen as more competent but often seen as less honest </li></ul>
  • 7. Types of Nonverbal Communication <ul><li>Pitch – highness or lowness of your voice </li></ul><ul><li>Volume – how loudly you speak; often if you are too quiet you are perceived as less competent on the subject you are speaking about </li></ul><ul><li>Quality – see text for traits </li></ul><ul><li>Vocal fillers – “um”, “ya know” etc – affects competence? </li></ul>
  • 8. Body Movement <ul><li>(also kinesics), all forms of body movement, excluding touching </li></ul><ul><li>Emblems – body movements that directly translate into words. These are often used when words may be in appropriate or when they tie people together (secret handshakes, etc) </li></ul>
  • 9. Body Movement <ul><li>Illustrators – accent, emphasize or reinforce words (measurements, etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Regulators – control the flow of conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptors – nonverbal ways of adjusting to a situation; not usually intended to be verbally communicated </li></ul>
  • 10. Eye Messages <ul><li>All information conveyed by the eyes </li></ul><ul><li>In the US, eye contact is usually seen as a sign of honesty and credibility. Are there differences in other cultures? </li></ul><ul><li>Eyes may signal turn-taking; this tells who is to talk next or to stop, slow down (acts as a regulator) </li></ul>

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