Session 7, Carrol & Lee

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CSR, Media & Reputation

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  • The politicians have the longest laps.
  • There is no statistical difference.
  • Session 7, Carrol & Lee

    1. 1. A LIMITED WINDOW AND A LIMITED RANGE:Corporations’ Published Reputation Response Strategies on CSR Topics in the News Media CSR COMMUNICATION CONFERENCE OCTOBER 2011 Sun Young Lee University of North Carolina-Chapel hill Craig E. Carroll, Ph.D. Lipscomb University
    2. 2. Purpose To examine how corporations defend their corporate social responsibility (CSR) reputations through letters to the editors of newspapers.
    3. 3. Research Questions Q1. How does the window of time between the original content and the published response differ by the type of authorship? Q2. How does the news section of the originating content differ by the type of authorship?
    4. 4. Method Comparing the authorships of letters to the editors written in response to previously published news and opinion articles. Topics are limited to CSR.
    5. 5. Method Sampling  Systematic sample of every 10th opinion piece featuring a publicly traded company  433-published letters  Nine geographically-distributed U.S. national and regional newspapers  Time frame: 1980-2004 (25 years)
    6. 6. Method Content analysis  Among 433 letters, 150 letters covered CSR topics Variables  CSR topics: economic, ethical, legal, and philanthropic responsibilities  Authorship: company representatives, think tanks, politicians, NGOs, professionals, labor unions, community groups, unaffiliated citizens, and pro- business voices  News section of the originating content  Window of time between the original content and the published response
    7. 7. Findings: Q1 Q1. How does the window of time between the original content and the published response differ by the type of authorship?  Mean of the time lags among all authorships:  10-14 days  No difference  Corporations were given a similar window of opportunity to respond to reputation threats through the news media, compared to window of time given to their stakeholders.
    8. 8.  Among all authorships: F (7, 112) = 2.02, p = .06
    9. 9.  Company vs. Non-Company: F (1, 118) = .05, p = .83  Company (N = 26): M = 12.77, SD = 33.17  Non-Company (N = 94): M = 14.34, SD = 37.28
    10. 10. Findings: Q2 Q2. How does the news section of the originating content differ by the type of authorship?  No difference statistically, however  χ²(12)=9.91, p=.62  Patterns on the graphs  Corporations < Other stakeholders (% within a news section)  Front-page news, Letters to the editors  Corporations ≈ Other stakeholders (% within a news section)  Business page, Column, Op-ed
    11. 11. Originality The first study to examine companies’ reputation response strategies published through letters to the editor The study on the news media in CSR Longitudinal study
    12. 12. Practical Implications Equal opportunity: A good way to reach the public in CSR issues Strategic media relations: More actively monitoring and responding to business news, column, and op-ed sections might help.

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