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Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble
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Session 1, Pomering, Johnson & Noble

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Marketing & Advertising CSR

Marketing & Advertising CSR

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  • 1/28/15
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  • Transcript

    • 1. Manipulating message variables for best practice in advertising CSR Alan Pomering Lester W. Johnson Gary Noble CSR Communication, Amsterdam, 2011
    • 2. Introduction  An investigation of two message variables believed necessary for effective advertising about CSR initiatives:  Social topic information  CSR Commitment information
    • 3. Literature Review  Increasing stakeholder expectation for CSR  Consumers report such information will influence their purchase behaviour (Cone/Echo, 2011) – “Consumers globally believe companies have an explicit responsibility to change the world.” – 10,000 consumers in 10 countries  Consumer responsibility can influence the fate of individual firms, but also the direction of industries and economies (Hansen and Schrader,1997)
    • 4. Communicating CSR because…  Offers a new frontier of competitive advantage (Becker- Olsen, Cudmore, and Hill, 2006; Pirsch, Gupta, and Landreth Grau, 2007)  Enhance brand differentiation (McWilliams and Siegel, 2001)  Brand equity (Hoeffler and Keller, 2002)  Competitive advantage (Porter and Kramer, 2002)  Customer loyalty (Bhattacharya and Sen 2003; Maignan, Ferrell and Hult, 1999)  Superior financial performance (Orlitzky, Schmidt, and Rynes, 2003)
    • 5. CSR-based Marcoms Examples
    • 6. But  “If consumer response to CSR was reliable and strong, most companies would have embraced the concept by now” (Mohr and Webb, 2005, p. 124)
    • 7. Research Problem  Firms want to inform key audiences (e.g. consumers) about their CSR initiatives  Using corporate image advertising  Obstacles to effectiveness – E.g. Scepticism/cynicism  How to improve effectiveness?
    • 8. Scepticism a Problem  Scepticism hinders persuasion  Firms typically fail to specify the impact of their CSR achievements, preferring vague or abstract claims instead (Pracejus, Olsen, and Brown, 2003/4)  Self-promoter’s paradox (Ashforth and Gibbs, 1990)  Cognitive response theory (Wright, 1973) and social judgment theory (Eagly &Chaiken, 1993)  CSR claims are typically credence information situations (Darby and Karni, 1973), so trust is important
    • 9. Inhibiting Scepticism  Through the message?  An experimental test
    • 10. Hypotheses  Social topic information – H1: Social Topic Information should interact with (and contextualise) CSR Commitment information to reduce scepticism  CSR Commitment information – H2: Should have a main effect on scepticism toward CSR advertising claims - greater specificity should reduce scepticism
    • 11. Our Approach  Unknown brand  Global arms trade (social issue)  Message elements: – Social topic – CSR Commitment
    • 12. Manipulating Message Variables  3 levels of Social Topic  3 levels of CSR Commitment
    • 13. Method  Scenario: a UK bank considering entering the Australian market  Between-subjects design  3x3 full factorial design  N=417 (18 years +) from an online consumer panel  Pre- and post-exposure questions  Effects of Ad Skepticism, Product Category Attitude (x2: Banks and Arms trade), and CSR Attitude removed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA)  Manipulation checks *  Qs counter-balanced
    • 14. Method: Dependent Variable  Scepticism toward CSR ad claims (4-item scale) – One item from Forehand and Grier’s (2003) firm evaluation scale, “Premier seems like the kind of bank I can trust.” – Two items from Du, Bhattacharya, and Sen’s (2007) CSR beliefs scale: “I think Premier is a socially responsible business.” and “Premier has had real impacts through its initiatives against the arms trade.” – A fourth item was added which not only investigates overall belief but also situates Premier Bank within its competitive set: “Premier seems like the sort of bank I can believe.” – All items were measured on a seven-point scale (Strongly disagree/Strongly agree), and showed a PCA univariate solution, with Cronbach’s alpha of 0.93, with item loadings ranged from 0.89 to 0.94
    • 15. Results  No interaction effect observed (F=0.67; df=2; p=0.51) H1 could not be supported  Main effect of CSR Commitment information was statistically significant (F=3.38, df=2; p=0.04) H2 supported
    • 16. Discussion  Social topic information’s role is likely issue- dependent (familiarity and attitude important)  Consumer scepticism can be inhibited with more specific message content (rather than information on policies)  An intuitive result  Question of message framing through image
    • 17. Limitations  A single case (product, issue)  Unknown brand  Extreme social issue  Australian marketplace
    • 18. Future Research  Check known brands  Good v. bad company reputation  Range of CSR issues  Role of image frame  Current work
    • 19. Questions Thank you for your attention!

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