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Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
Session 1, Farache
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Session 1, Farache

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Marketing & Advertising CSR

Marketing & Advertising CSR

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
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  • 1. Scepticism in CSR advertisements Francisca Farache Keith Perks Brighton Business School
  • 2. Why? <ul><li>CSR advertising is subject to scepticism </li></ul><ul><li>Corporations are increasingly using CSR advertising campaigns to publicise their initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>To increase credibility companies should communicate with the necessary support </li></ul><ul><li>The use of substantial information </li></ul><ul><li>Third party association </li></ul><ul><li>Six advertisement campaigns – 3 in the UK and 3 in Brazil </li></ul>
  • 3. Main research questions <ul><li>What is the level of substantial information in CSR advertisements? </li></ul><ul><li>Do companies associate themselves with other organisations in their CSR advertisements? </li></ul>
  • 4. What do we mean by <ul><li>Substantial information - relates to information such as investments, number of people benefited and the CSR programme. </li></ul><ul><li>Associations with third parties - such as non-governmental organisations, government, and partnerships with associations and other businesses </li></ul>
  • 5. Main findings <ul><li>Low volume of substantial information </li></ul><ul><li>it is to bring vitality not only with quality products, but, above all, with a business model that exhibits social and environmental responsibility . Unilever, ‘How Unilever is moving’ </li></ul><ul><li>High volume of substantial information </li></ul><ul><li>There are more than 108 thousands students – children, youngsters and adults – benefiting in 40 schools around all the Brazilian states and the Federal District, in an investment that totalled more than R$157 million in the last year alone. Bradesco, ‘The biggest investor in education’ </li></ul>
  • 6. Main findings - examples <ul><li>Helping the U.S. government save taxpayers $151 million while reducing greenhouse gas emissions by an expected 1.5 million tons. Chevron, ‘A 5% reduction’ </li></ul><ul><li>… partnership with the Fundacão S.O.S. Mata Atlântica [Atlantic Forest Foundation] , 14 million seedlings destined for the recuperation of the forest… Bradesco, ‘The biggest investor in education’ </li></ul>
  • 7. Findings - summary <ul><li>Three companies present a low amount of information, one provides a mix of low, medium and high levels and only two present a high volume of substantial information in their advertisements </li></ul><ul><li>Three of the companies surveyed report their associations with other institutions in their advertisements </li></ul>
  • 8. Main conclusions <ul><li>The advertisements do not seem to address the concerns regarding scepticism </li></ul><ul><li>The way corporations develop their advertisements only provide more fuel for the growing concern regarding the lack of transparency and credibility in CSR advertising </li></ul><ul><li>The research found that corporations in Brazil tend to provide a higher level of substantial information than corporations advertising in the UK </li></ul><ul><li>Half of the companies disclose third party association </li></ul>
  • 9. Further research <ul><li>Further research could be carried out with a larger sample in order to provide more evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Could also investigate whether the amount of substantial information and third party association are related to industry type </li></ul>
  • 10. Final thoughts <ul><li>This paper does not claim that companies which provide high volumes of substantial and third party association information are not subject to scepticism about their CSR messages </li></ul><ul><li>The provision of high levels of substantial and third party association information seems to be a good starting point for communicate CSR engagement in a credible way. </li></ul>

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