Communica)on	  of	  CSR:	  The	  iden)ty	  challenge	  of	  being	  	  branded	  as	  “good”:	                            ...
Generalized	  expecta;on	  to	  increase	         in	  communica;on	  	  of	  CSR:	                                	  	   ...
Communica;on	  of	  CSR:	  	                   An	  interdisciplinary	  exercise	  Much	  research	  has	  inves;gated	  C...
Communica;on	  of	  CSR:	  	                        An	  interdisciplinary	  exercise	                                    ...
Communica;on	  of	  CSR:	  	                              An	  interdisciplinary	  exercise	                              ...
Posi;ve	  iden;fica;on	  is	  taken	  for	  granted	  	  by	  communica;on	  research	  and	  management:	  	   	   Researc...
Why	  is	  iden;ty	  important	  for	  understanding	  	  the	  corporate	  project	  of	  communica;ng	  CSR	  1)	  Emplo...
Damned	  if	  we	  do.	  Damned	  if	  we	  don’t. 	  	  	  Anita	  Roddick	  on	  CSR	  communica3on	  in	  Body	  Shop s...
Whose	  iden;ty	  is	  displayed	  in	  corporate	  brand	  promises	  of	  CSR?	  
• 	  Employing	  more	  than	  5,000	  people.	  	  • 	  Los	  Angeles	  manufacturing	  facili;es.	  • 	  Paying	  worker...
Why	  is	  iden;ty	  important	  for	  understanding	  	  the	  corporate	  project	  of	  communica;ng	  CSR	  1)	  Emplo...
Communica;on	  of	  CSR	  in	  frame	                 Theore;cal	             the	  perspec;ve	  of	       auto-­‐communic...
Why	  is	  iden;ty	  important	  for	  understanding	  	  the	  corporate	  project	  of	  communica;ng	  CSR	  1)	  Emplo...
To	  what	  extent	  is	  communica;on	  of	   CSR	  a	  communica;on	  dept.	  task?	                                Boar...
...	  and	  to	  what	  extent	  is	  communica;on	           of	  CSR	  an	  organiza;onal	  task?	                      ...
Why	  is	  iden;ty	  important	  for	  understanding	  	  the	  corporate	  project	  of	  communica;ng	  CSR	  1)	  Emplo...
So,	  what’s	  so	  special	  about	  communica;on	  of	  CSR?	  Why	  does	  communica;on	  of	  CSR	  involve	  employee...
Framework	  towards	  understanding	  	    how	  communica;on	  influences	  iden;ty:	  Member	  percep;ons	  of	  communic...
Framework	  towards	  understanding	  	       how	  communica;on	  influences	  iden;ty:	     Member	  percep;ons	  of	  co...
                               Iden;fica;on	                                                                               ...
Cynical	                                                                                                                  ...
                               Iden;fica;on	                                                                               ...
Cynical	                                                                      Iden;fica;on	      distance	                 ...
Cynical	                                                                                                                  ...
Cynical	                                                                      Iden;fica;on	      distance	                 ...
Cynical	                                                                                           Iden;fica;on	      dista...
Cynical	                                                                                                                  ...
Cynical	                                                                                           Iden;fica;on	      dista...
Cynical	                                                                                   Iden;fica;on	      distance	    ...
Cynical	                                                                                                                  ...
Cynical	                                                                                   Iden;fica;on	      distance	    ...
A	  non-­‐desirable	  scenario:	  Member	  percep;ons	  of	  communica;on	  of	  CSR	                    POSITIVE	  PERCEP...
 So,	  can	  we	  learn	  something	  about	  stakeholder	  rela;ons	  from	  inves;ga;ng	  how	  iden;ty	  is	  influenced...
Communica;on	  influences	  iden;ty:	  consumer	  rela;ons	  to	  corpora;on	  communica;on	  of	  CSR	                    ...
 Summing	  up:	  Communica;on	  of	  CSR	  as	  a	  	  posi;ve	  iden;fier	  as	  well	  as	  an	  iden;ty	  threat	    	  ...
CONCLUDING	  NOTE:	  Ques;ons	  for	  research	  	  	  1)	  How	  not	  only	  socially	  undesirable	  but	  also	  socia...
Thank	  you	  	  Me$e	  Morsing	  Copenhagen	  Business	  School	  mm.ikl@cbs.dk	  
Keynote Mette Morsing
Keynote Mette Morsing
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Keynote Mette Morsing

1,288

Published on

Keynote Morsing 28 october

Published in: Business, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,288
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
22
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Keynote Mette Morsing

  1. 1. Communica)on  of  CSR:  The  iden)ty  challenge  of  being    branded  as  “good”:       Me$e  Morsing   Centre  for  Corporate  Social  Responsibility  (cbsCSR)   Copenhagen  Business  School     CSR  Communica,on  Conference   Amsterdam,  October  28,  2011    
  2. 2. Generalized  expecta;on  to  increase   in  communica;on    of  CSR:        Isomorphic  pressures  for  corpora;ons  to  not  only  ”do”  but  also  explicitly  ”communicate”  their  CSR  polices,  ac;ons  and  impacts,  expecta;ons  from  societal  actors  that  corpora;ons  par;cipate  in  reparing  the  planet  (Campbell,  2007).    From  implicit  to  explicit  CSR  approaches  (Ma$en  &  Moon,  2008)    Just  four  days  ago:  EU  Commission’s  new  ”Communica)on  on  CSR”,  October  25,  2011:  A  new  defini;on  of  CSR  as  “the  responsibility  of  enterprises  for  their  impacts  on  society”.  ”more  visibility  of  CSR”  (awards,  clarifica;on,  transparency,  documenta;on,  inclusion  of  public  sector,  etc.)    
  3. 3. Communica;on  of  CSR:     An  interdisciplinary  exercise  Much  research  has  inves;gated  CSR  communica;on  in  analysis  of  adver)sing,  CSR  as  a  marke)ng  dimension  (e.g.  Maignan  &  Ferrell,  2002;  Metzger,  2009),  topic  analysis  of  codes  of  conduct  and  CSR  reports  (e.g.  Kolk,  2002),  CSR  accountability  and  transparency  (e.g.  Zadek  et  al.,  2008;  O’Dwyer,  2006)  or  social  media  of  CSR  network  (e.g.  Fieseler  et  al.  2009),  CSR  as  dialogue  (Andriof  et  al,  2042;  Hardis,  2002),  NGO  ac)vism  (Vestergaard,  2011;  Castello  &  Barbera,  2011)  or  media  men;on  of  CSR  (Buhr  &  Grafström,  2006)    Only  li$le  research  has  explored  how  communica;on  of  CSR  (such  as  fx  ethical  codes  of  conduct)  work  to  ins;tu;onalize  new  behaviors  in  organiza;ons  (e.g.  Academy  of  Management’s  special  issue:  Corpora;ons  as  social  change  agents,  2007):  how  internal  processes  and  mo;ves  of  organiza;onal  members  determine  how  organiza;ons  shape  ac;on  and  relate  to  external  stakeholders  (Brickson  2007,  Aguilera  et  al  2007),  and  inves;ga;on  of  how  cer;fied  management  standards  shape  socially  desired  firm  behavior  (Terlaak  2007).    Communica;on  of  CSR  signals  promises  and  expecta;ons  to  organiza;onal  integrity  and  reliability  that  includes  the  organiza;on  as  a  whole  (Christensen,  Morsing  &  Cheney,  2006).  Much  instrumental  research  on  CSR  communica;on  therefore  centers  on  the  no;on  of  consistency  (e.g.,  MacIntosh,  2007;  Ihlen,  Bartle$  and  May,  2011).  But  it  is  an  open  ques;on  if  CSR  the  gap  between  words  and  ac;on  will  ever  be  closed?  Will  a  company  ever  by  10%  socially  responsible?  Research  on  accountability,  transparency  and  corporate  communica;on  assumes  (implicitly)  that  words  and  ac;ons  must  be  consistent  for  the  CSR  message  to  be  trustworthy.  Cri;cal  management  research  ques;ons  and  inves;gates  to  what  extent  corporate  messages  about  CSR  are  a  true  reflec;on  of  reality?  Are  organiza;ons  living  up  to  their  own  words?  Communica;on  scholars  have  argued  that  CSR  is  about  aspira;onal  talk  (Christensen  et  al.  2010)  and  that  ins;tu;onaliza;on  of  communica;on  of  CSR  will  increase  gap  between  words  and  ac;on.  However,  such  gap  may  be  produc;ve.  A  devoid  of  gaps  may  mean  iner;a  and  rigidity  and  be  counterproduc;ve  for  organiza;onal  flexibility  and  innova;on  within  the  area  of  social  and  environmental  responsibility.      
  4. 4. Communica;on  of  CSR:     An  interdisciplinary  exercise   Public  rela;ons  THEMES:    Company-­‐stakeholder  dialogue   Poli;cal   Corporate  Reuta;on   communica;on   communica;on    NGO  Ac;vism  Democray  Transparency  Accountability   Communica;on   of  CSR  CSR  reports  Codes  of  conduct  Media     Marke;ng  and   corporate   Media  and  Adver;sing   branding   culture  studies  …   theory  …    INSTRUMENTAL  RESEARCH   Iden;ty  AND  INTERPRETIVE  RESEARCH    
  5. 5. Communica;on  of  CSR:     An  interdisciplinary  exercise   Public  rela;ons  THEMES:    Company-­‐stakeholder  dialogue   Poli;cal   Corporate   communica;on   communica;on  Reuta;on  NGO  Ac;vism  Democray  Transparency  Accountability   Communica;on  CSR  reports   of  CSR  Codes  of  conduct   Communica;on   Media  and   studies   culture  studies  Media    Adver;sing  …  …     Iden;ty   Marke;ng  and  *  INSTRUMENTAL  RESEARCH   corporate   branding  theory  *  INTERPRETIVE  RESEARCH  *  CRITICAL  MANAGEMENT  STUDIES    
  6. 6. Posi;ve  iden;fica;on  is  taken  for  granted    by  communica;on  research  and  management:       Research  implicitly  seems  to  assume  that   corporate  communica,on  of  CSR  is  seamlessly   desired,  integrated  and  adopted  into   organiza,onal  prac,ce  by  members.     Managers  tend  to  agree:  ”CSR  is  part  of  or  DNA”       However,  maybe  communica;on  of  CSR  is  not   always  be  welcomed  that  easily  …    
  7. 7. Why  is  iden;ty  important  for  understanding    the  corporate  project  of  communica;ng  CSR  1)  Employees  are  –  willingly  or  unwillingly  –  central  part  of  the  communica)on    of  CSR,  of  the  corporate  brand  promise  of  CSR  (Hatch  &  Schultz,  2009)  2)  Organisa;onal  members  are  probably  the  most  engaged  stakeholder  of  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR  (Christensen  &  Cheney,  2001)  3)  Iden)ty  decides  the  ways  in  which  organiza)ons  engage  in  social  ac)on,    and  relate  to  external  stakeholders  (Brickson,  1997)    4)  Employees  may  be  seen  as  a  new  ”public”  (e.g.  public  rela;ons)  in  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR.  Employees  become  a  ”public”  because  they  are  cons;tuted  as  the  corporate  brand  on  CSR.  This  is  accentuated  by    social  media,  where  employees  are  invited  to  discuss  social  issues,  but  par;cipate  as  ”themselves”  but  speak  in  accordance  with  the  corporate  CSR  policy.  
  8. 8. Damned  if  we  do.  Damned  if  we  don’t.      Anita  Roddick  on  CSR  communica3on  in  Body  Shop s  first  non-­‐financial  report  1995,  p.5  
  9. 9. Whose  iden;ty  is  displayed  in  corporate  brand  promises  of  CSR?  
  10. 10. •   Employing  more  than  5,000  people.    •   Los  Angeles  manufacturing  facili;es.  •   Paying  workers  12  USD  an  hour  (minimum  wage:  6,75  USD)  
  11. 11. Why  is  iden;ty  important  for  understanding    the  corporate  project  of  communica;ng  CSR  1)  Employees  are  –  willingly  or  unwillingly  –  central  part  of  the  communica)on    of  CSR,  of  the  corporate  brand  promise  of  CSR  (Hatch  &  Schultz,  2009)  2)  Organisa;onal  members  are  probably  the  most  engaged  stakeholder  of  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR  (Christensen  &  Cheney,  2001)  3)  Iden)ty  decides  the  ways  in  which  organiza)ons  engage  in  social  ac)on,    and  relate  to  external  stakeholders  (Brickson,  1997)    4)  Employees  may  be  seen  as  a  new  ”public”  (e.g.  public  rela;ons)  in  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR.  Employees  become  a  ”public”  because  they  are  cons;tuted  as  the  corporate  brand  on  CSR.  This  is  accentuated  by    social  media,  where  employees  are  invited  to  discuss  social  issues,  but  par;cipate  as  ”themselves”  but  speak  in  accordance  with  the  corporate  CSR  policy.  
  12. 12. Communica;on  of  CSR  in  frame   Theore;cal   the  perspec;ve  of   auto-­‐communica;on    Figure  1:  Adver;sing  as  Auto-­‐communica;on  (Christensen,  1997:208)   Message  1:   Message  1:   Sender   Adver)sement   Adver)sement   The  ideal   Code  1:   Code  2:   corporate   we   Sales  or   Organiza;onal   Posi;oning  rhetoric   Self-­‐percep;on   Displacement   of  Context   Receiver   Message  2:   The  ideal   Community,   corporate   we   Belonging   Iden)fica)on  
  13. 13. Why  is  iden;ty  important  for  understanding    the  corporate  project  of  communica;ng  CSR  1)  Employees  are  –  willingly  or  unwillingly  –  central  part  of  the  communica)on    of  CSR,  of  the  corporate  brand  promise  of  CSR  (Hatch  &  Schultz,  2009)  2)  Organisa;onal  members  are  probably  the  most  engaged  stakeholder  of  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR  (Christensen  &  Cheney,  2001)  3)  Iden)ty  decides  the  ways  in  which  organiza)ons  engage  in  social  ac)on,    and  relate  to  external  stakeholders  (Brickson,  1997)    4)  Employees  may  be  seen  as  a  new  ”public”  (e.g.  public  rela;ons)  in  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR.  Employees  become  a  ”public”  because  they  are  cons;tuted  as  the  corporate  brand  on  CSR.  This  is  accentuated  by    social  media,  where  employees  are  invited  to  discuss  social  issues,  but  par;cipate  as  ”themselves”  but  speak  in  accordance  with  the  corporate  CSR  policy.  
  14. 14. To  what  extent  is  communica;on  of   CSR  a  communica;on  dept.  task?   Board   CEO     Marke;ng/ R&D   Logis;cs   Finance   Communica;on    
  15. 15. ...  and  to  what  extent  is  communica;on   of  CSR  an  organiza;onal  task?   Board   CEO     Marke;ng/ R&D   Logis;cs   Finance   Communica;on    
  16. 16. Why  is  iden;ty  important  for  understanding    the  corporate  project  of  communica;ng  CSR  1)  Employees  are  –  willingly  or  unwillingly  –  central  part  of  the  communica)on    of  CSR,  of  the  corporate  brand  promise  of  CSR  (Hatch  &  Schultz,  2009)  2)  Organisa;onal  members  are  probably  the  most  engaged  stakeholder  of  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR  (Christensen  &  Cheney,  2001)  3)  Iden)ty  decides  the  ways  in  which  organiza)ons  engage  in  social  ac)on,    and  relate  to  external  stakeholders  (Brickson,  1997)    4)  Employees  may  be  seen  as  a  new  ”public”  (e.g.  public  rela;ons)  in  the  corporate  communica;on  of  CSR.  Employees  become  a  ”public”  because  they  are  cons;tuted  as  the  corporate  brand  on  CSR.  This  is  accentuated  by    social  media,  where  employees  are  invited  to  discuss  social  issues,  but  par;cipate  as  ”themselves”  but  speak  in  accordance  with  the  corporate  CSR  policy.  
  17. 17. So,  what’s  so  special  about  communica;on  of  CSR?  Why  does  communica;on  of  CSR  involve  employees?     Expecta)ons  about  a  )ght  coupling  between  words  and  deeds    That  companies  do  what  they  say     An  expecta)on  about  authen)city      That  the  company  not  only  does  but  also  believes  in  what  it  says     Most  oPen  an  expecta)on  of  moral  commitment  to  responsibility    That  CSR  implies  an  ethical  responsibility     Expeca)ons  about  a  longterm  commitment    That  the  company  does  not  withdraw  its  CSR  promise      
  18. 18. Framework  towards  understanding     how  communica;on  influences  iden;ty:  Member  percep;ons  of  communica;on  of  CSR   POSITIVE  PERCEPTIONS                                        NEGATIVE  PERCEPTIONS  CORPORATE   Cynical  SUPPORT   Iden;fica;on     distance        CORPORATE  RISK     Self-­‐ Resistance   absorp;on  
  19. 19. Framework  towards  understanding     how  communica;on  influences  iden;ty:   Member  percep;ons  of  communica;on  of  CSR   POSITIVE  PERCEPTIONS                                        NEGATIVE  PERCEPTIONS  CORPORATE   Cynical  SUPPORT   Iden;fica;on     distance        CORPORATE  RISK     Self-­‐ Resistance   absorp;on  
  20. 20.   Iden;fica;on   Cynical     distance   Self-­‐ Iden;fica;on   absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  Personal  dedica;on  and  self-­‐gra;fica;on  by  par;cipa;ng  in  the  company’s  statements  about  contribu;ons  to  solve  the  world’s  social  and  environmental  problems      Research  ques)on:  when  does  iden)fica)on  occur?  Contextualiza;on  of  posi;ve  iden;fica;on  with  communica;on  of  CSR?  (Elsbach  &  Kramer,  Du$on  &  Dukerich).  Leadership?  Culture?  Values?  Or  perhaps  communica;on  itself?    
  21. 21. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Iden;fica;on   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Observa,ons:  “Sustainable  living  is  about  improving  society,  even  though  we  also  gain  from  it  in  a  business  economic  sense.  I  am  proud  of  that.  I  am  pleased  that  VELUX  works  with  Sustainable  Living  –  that  I  work  for  a  company  with  a  sustainability  strategy.  But  I  also  expect  my  workplace  to  do  so.  Otherwise  I  would  not  want  to  work  here”.  (VEPO))    “It  means  something  very  personal  for  me  that  I  work  in  a  company  that  ac,vely  pursues  to  improve  social  and  environmental  problems  at  a  global  scale.  Novo  Nordisk  has  been  a  frontrunner  on  sustainability  issues  and  con,nuously  sets  high  goals  for  itself.  I  am  proud  of  being  part  of  it  and  I  am  proud  of  telling  my  family  about  it”  (NNOK)    “I  think  it  is  mo,va,ng  to  know  that  we  build  factories  that  make  a  difference  for  people  all  over  the  world.  Even  though  our  part  is  just  a  ,ny  step  and  even  though  it  might  be  a  liZle  far-­‐fetched  to  state  that  we  are  saving  the  world,  you  feel  that  you  are  doing  something  important  which  is  reflected  in  the  brand.”  [SBDT]      “We  are  a  large  mul,na,onal  player  with  global  influence,  and  we  must  contribute  to  a  more  sustainable  world.  For  me  working  in  company  that  takes  steps  to  improving  labor  condi,ons  in  for  example  Asia  is  very  important.  Okay,  we  are  not  perfect.  But  we  dare  to  do  take  ac,on  and  to  serve  as  a  role  model  by  also  pu`ng  demands  on  our  suppliers.  In  this  way,  XXX  helps  to  spread  rings  in  the  water  for  a  beZer  world”.  (IKOK)      
  22. 22.   Iden;fica;on   Cynical     distance   Self-­‐ Iden;fica;on   absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  Personal  dedica;on  and  self-­‐gra;fica;on  by  par;cipa;ng  in  the  company’s  statements  about  contribu;ons  to  solve  the  world’s  social  and  environmental  problems      Research  ques)on:  when  does  iden)fica)on  occur?  Contextualiza;on  of  posi;ve  iden;fica;on  with  communica;on  of  CSR?  (Elsbach  &  Kramer,  Du$on  &  Dukerich).  Leadership?  Culture?  Values?  Or  perhaps  communica;on  itself?    
  23. 23. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Self-­‐absorp;on   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  Strong  sense  of  self,  autonomous  sense-­‐making:  ”we  are  doing  the  right  thing”,  self-­‐confidence  of  the  corporate  engagement  in  social  and  environmental  issues,  narcissism    Research  ques)on:  ?  What  lead  employees  to  not  listening  to  cri;que?  Self-­‐closure  and  communica;on  as  ritual  (Christensen,  1997),  defense  strategies  and  denial  of  cri;que  as  communica;on  rou;nes  (Cornelissen,  2010      
  24. 24. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Self-­‐absorp;on   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Observa;ons:  Percep3ons  of  managerial  self-­‐absorp3on:  ”Management  is  invited  to  conferences  and  presenta,ons  talking  about  all  the  good  deeds  we  do.  They  love  hearing  themselves  talk  about  CSR.  But  it  most  of  all  seems  like  they  are  celebra,ng  themselves  –  forge`ng  the  serious  cause  about  poor  peopel  and  climate  change  we  are  actually  doing  this  for”  (VEXA)    “We  have  had  our  focus  on  an  external  audience  and  have  treated  our  internal  colleagues  as  a  stepchild.  Informa,on  is  oben  available  on  the  intranet,  but  it  is  just  a  copy  of  the  external  messages  -­‐  it  is  not  wriZen  to  me  as  an  employee.  That  means,  why  do  we  par,cipate  in  the  different  events?  For  example,  we  decided  to  be  part  of  COP  15  –  what  was  our  strategy  for  doing  that?  It  is  all  about  making  demonstra,on  houses  and  talking  to  poli,cians,  while  ge`ng  employees  on  board  …  who  cares?”  (Employee,  VEMU)      Percep3ons  of  marke3ng  dept.  self-­‐absorp3on:  “When  I  had  to  present  this,  I  believe  I  said:  This  is  then  our  Marke,ng  Department  who  believes  that  we  need  to  be  presented  as  something  new  and  fancy  –  something  like  that  –  and  then  we  laughed  about  it  and  we  did  not  talk  about  it  again.  “  [CCSJ]      GeFng  absorbed  in  poten3ally  peripheral  or  disconnected  CSR:    X  Coffee  company  engaging  in  animal  welfare  due  to  the  owner-­‐manager’s  personal  preferences    Not  listening  to  stakeholder  concerns  and  sugges3ons:  Nestlé-­‐GreenPeace  
  25. 25. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Self-­‐absorp;on   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  Strong  sense  of  self,  autonomous  sense-­‐making:  ”we  are  doing  the  right  thing”,  self-­‐confidence  of  the  corporate  engagement  in  social  and  environmental  issues,  narcissism    Research  ques)on:  ?  What  lead  employees  to  not  listening  to  cri;que?  Self-­‐closure  and  communica;on  as  ritual  (Christensen,  1997),  defense  strategies  and  denial  of  cri;que  as  communica;on  rou;nes  (Cornelissen,  2010      
  26. 26. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Cynical  distance*   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  Employees  distancing  themselves  from  the  corporate  promise  of  CSR,  yet  obedient  by  passively  conforming.  Silent  (dormant)  disagreement.  ”I  dont  want  to  do  it,  but  I  know  I  have  to  do  it”.  The  pressure  to  perform  CSR.    Research  ques)on:  ?  How  do  impulses  to  openly  resist  become  neutralized?  Why  do  employees  not  ac;vely  sabotage  or  protest  their  disagreement?  (Spicer  &  Fleming).  What  societal  processes  of  ins;tu;onaliza;on  re-­‐inforce  cynical  distance  to  communica;on  of  CSR?        Source  of  concept:  Spicer  &  Fleming  
  27. 27. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Cynical  distance   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Observa;ons:  ”So  we  just  try  to  work  around  it.  Nobody  really  talks  about  [the  CSR  tagline]  …  Maybe  it  is  this  taglin,e  that  is  a  bit  American  and  too  different  from  what  one  would  have  done  in  Denmark.  Not  that  it  is  wrong  –  I  don’t  know  what  works  out  there  in  the  world.  I  am  not  a  marke,ng  person,  so  if  it  works  it  is  ok.  But  I  do  understand  the  people,  who  think  that  it  is  over  the  top.  It  is  not  Danish  mentality.”  [CQ]    [I  am]  a  bit  skep,cal  [towards  the  brand]  because  we  would  like  to  contribute  to  improve  things  in  society,  but  we  are  more  than  700  employees  in  Denmark  and  a  lot  of  what  we  do  is  good  robust  engineering  work  and  not  necessarily  this  high-­‐fly  kind  of  thing.  So  [the  brand]  easily  sounds  like  very  grand  and  high  in  the  sky-­‐like  –  ”Engineering  for  a  healthier  world”  it  brings  out  tears  in  your  eyes  [laughing]”  [JARN]    ”  […]  Right  when  we  had  those  new  templates  and  the  front  page  with  the  globe  –  what  did  we  need  that  for  –  and  the  tagline  and  all  that.  I  actually  thought  it  was  embarrassing  to  come  to  those  customer  mee,ngs.  [...]  When  I  sat  there  opposite  the  customer  and  had  to  present  it  [the  company]  with  that  front  page  –  I  quickly  turned  the  page  away  from  it  […].  Now  I  am  more  used  to  it.  [CCSJ]    
  28. 28. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Cynical  distance*   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  Employees  distancing  themselves  from  the  corporate  promise  of  CSR,  yet  obedient  by  passively  conforming.  Silent  (dormant)  disagreement.  ”I  dont  want  to  do  it,  but  I  know  I  have  to  do  it”.  The  pressure  to  perform  CSR.    Research  ques)on:  ?  How  do  impulses  to  openly  resist  become  neutralized?  Why  do  employees  not  ac;vely  sabotage  or  protest  their  disagreement?  (Spicer  &  Fleming).  What  societal  processes  of  ins;tu;onaliza;on  re-­‐inforce  cynical  distance  to  communica;on  of  CSR?        Source  of  concept:  Spicer  &  Fleming  
  29. 29. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Resistance   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  CSR  is  perceived  as  ”implicit”,  employees  opposing  that  the  values  and  ”authen;city”  of  CSR  is  being  supplanted  by  commercial  interests:  ”CSR  is  part  of  our  cultural  heritage,  it  is  NOT  a  branding  exercise”.  Refusal  to  par;cipate,  engage  in  CSR  but  only  in  own  area  of  exper;se.  Percep;ons  of  corporate  over-­‐promising,  or  CSR  fa;gues.    Research  ques)on:  ?  How  does  explicit  communica;on  of  CSR  contribute  to  employee  resistance?  In  what  ways  does  resistance  to  a  socially  desirable  act  (CSR)  transform  into  a  perceived  iden;ty  threat?  
  30. 30. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Resistance   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Observa;ons:  ”I  think  this  is  very  important  for  companies  to  take  part  in  CSR.  And  I  think  it  is  very  important  for  XX  to  be  socially  responsible.  In  fact,  this  is  ingrained  in  our  heritage.  But  the  recent  approach  to  be  ”Thought  Leader  in  Sustainable  Living”  …  I  simply  fail  to  see  how  that  has  anything  to  do  with  our  CSR  values,  and  I  am  not  the  one  engaging  myself  in  this  project”  (VEME)    ”Well,  we  are  si`ng  here  as  ordinary  engineers,  doing  our  work  and  then  some  fancy  marke,ng  agency  from  the  expensive  neighborhoods  of  Copenhagen  comes  along  –  actually,  I  dont  know  where  they  are  form,  but  it  feels  that  way  –  and  suddenly  there  is  this  big  bubble  of  ”doing  right”  around  you”  (MHOU)    “I  have  absolutely  no  idea.  I  don’t  use  it  myself  –  and  I  am  not  going  to  use  it.  It  would  seem  completely  wrong  on  the  occasions  where  I  talk  to  customers.  […]  Pain,ng  an  icon  of  our  company  is  too  big  a  step.  It  is  easier  for  me  to  look  the  customer  in  the  eyes  and  build  trust  from  the  liZle  things  we  do  instead  of  this  thing  about  crea,ng  a  beZer  world.  […]  I  am  not  ready  at  all  to  take  up  that  discussion.”    [KIMT]    
  31. 31. Cynical   Iden;fica;on   distance   Resistance   Self-­‐ absorp;on   Resistance  Characteris)c:  CSR  is  perceived  as  ”implicit”,  employees  opposing  that  the  values  and  ”authen;city”  of  CSR  is  being  supplanted  by  commercial  interests:  ”CSR  is  part  of  our  cultural  heritage,  it  is  NOT  a  branding  exercise”.  Refusal  to  par;cipate,  engage  in  CSR  but  only  in  own  area  of  exper;se.  Percep;ons  of  corporate  over-­‐promising,  or  CSR  fa;gues.    Research  ques)on:  ?  How  does  explicit  communica;on  of  CSR  contribute  to  employee  resistance?  In  what  ways  does  resistance  to  a  socially  desirable  act  (CSR)  transform  into  a  perceived  iden;ty  threat?  
  32. 32. A  non-­‐desirable  scenario:  Member  percep;ons  of  communica;on  of  CSR   POSITIVE  PERCEPTIONS                                        NEGATIVE  PERCEPTIONS   CORPORATE   Cynical   SUPPORT   Iden;fica;on     distance         CORPORATE   RISK     Self-­‐ Resistance   absorp;on  
  33. 33.  So,  can  we  learn  something  about  stakeholder  rela;ons  from  inves;ga;ng  how  iden;ty  is  influenced  by  communica;on  of  CSR  and  trying  to  understand  the  most  dedicated  ”public”’s  commitment  and  hesita;ons?    I  think  so  …    
  34. 34. Communica;on  influences  iden;ty:  consumer  rela;ons  to  corpora;on  communica;on  of  CSR   POSITIVE  PERCEPTIONS                                        NEGATIVE  PERCEPTIONS   Cynical  distance   CORPORATE   Iden;fica;on   SUPPORT    THE  APATHETIC     THE  FAN     CONSUMER       CORPORATE   RISK     Self-­‐absorp;on   Resistance    THE  NARCISSISTIC   THE  SKEPTICAL   CONSUMER   CONSUMER  
  35. 35.  Summing  up:  Communica;on  of  CSR  as  a    posi;ve  iden;fier  as  well  as  an  iden;ty  threat         Communica;on  of  CSR  as  a  powerful  source  of  cultural  engineering   of  employees’  selves     On  the  one  hand,  communica;on  of  CSR  serves  to  enhance  member   iden;fica;on  with  the  corporate  brand,  to  increase  member  loyalty,   commitment,  dedica;on  and  self-­‐gra;fica;on,  …     On  the  other  hand,  communica;on  of  CSR  also  func;ons   ambiguously  as  a  compelling  and  powerful  narra;ve  for  employees   while  simultaneously  cap;va;ng  organiza;onal  iden;ty  as  a  form  of   iden;ty  threat  in  which  increased  pressure  to  perform  is  enacted,   cri;cism  is  pacified  and  local  iden;fica;on  with  the  CSR  message  is   discouraged.  
  36. 36. CONCLUDING  NOTE:  Ques;ons  for  research      1)  How  not  only  socially  undesirable  but  also  socially  desirable  features    a$ached  to  a  corporate  image    threaten  the  organiza;onal  self-­‐concept    of  its  members      2)  Resistance  not  only  “becomes  an  integra;ve  mechanism  reinforcing    the  domina;on”  (Spicer  and  Fleming)  but  rather  reintroduces  the  domina;on    upon  the  individual  member  to  passively  subjugate  him  or  herself  and  accept    the  domina;on  of  a  publicly  perceived  desirable  corporate  brand  feature    3)  Therefore,  challenges  the  no;on  of  CSR  being  a  voluntary  ac;vity  for  organiza;onal    members,  as  we  argue  that  employees  are  cap;vated  and  pacified  to  reproduce  Managerial  visions  of  CSR  in  uncri;cal  ways  -­‐  by  the  corporate  brand  promise  of  CSR    4)  Such  resistance  is  likely  to  be  accentuated  when  employees  become  part  of  the  corporate  brand  messages  in  social  media  where  they  are  encouraged  to  personally  engage  with  external  audiences  but  remain  with  the  communicated  frame  of    corporate  CSR  policies  and  ac;vi;es.  
  37. 37. Thank  you    Me$e  Morsing  Copenhagen  Business  School  mm.ikl@cbs.dk  
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×