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Vision2050 kiev

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  • Vision 2050 is the result of a collaborative effort. The project was governed by four co-chair companies (Alcoa, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Storebrand, and Syngenta), and the content developed by 29 WBCSD member companies through working with each other, with hundreds of representatives from business, government and civil society, with regional partners and with experts. It also builds on WBCSD reports and work done by others.The 29 companies represent a wide range of sectors (aerospace, biotechnology, building materials, chemicals, electronics, energy, forestry & paper, household & personal products, information technology services, insurance, metals, mining, motor vehicles, utilities) and are from different parts of the world (North America, Europe, Asia).
  • Throughout the project, a number of core workshops and dialogues were conducted in major regions around the world. The aim was to ensure that the findings from Vision 2050 reflect a global perspective. The mapping here shows the regions engaged in this highly collaborative and productive effort – which was made possible through the support of the WBCSD Regional Network partners and various other stakeholder groups.
  • The Vision 2050 project is a backcasting exercise.We started by depicting what the world will look like in 2050 if we do not address correctly the sustainability challengeBased on this picture, we developed a vision for 2050 of a world well on-track toward sustainability. A world in which the global population is not just living on the planet, but living well and within the limits of the planet.A pathway was developed to connect this sustainable future with the present. The goal was to see what a real, global attempt at sustainable development – with all the radical policy and lifestyle changes this would entail – would mean for business and markets in general and for the individual participating sectors.The good news is that there are significant opportunities within this transition – to do more with less, to create new products and services, and to provide value to both our customers and shareholders. Those companies that understand that global challenges are becoming the key strategic drivers for business and appreciate the need for firm action and new partnerships to address societies problems – are most likely to be the winners.
  • The business-as-usual outlook to 2050 was our starting point. We tried to identify the major trends for 2050 in terms of social and economic development and their predictable impact on the environment, in order to answer this simple question: what will the world look like if we do not address the sustainability challenge correctly?
  • Our first step was to identify the major trends for 2050 in terms of social and economic development and their predictable impact on the environment, in order to answer this simple question: what will the world look like if we do not address the sustainability challenge correctly?The story that we have found is one of growth in populations and consumption (in most countries) compounded by inertia stemming from inadequate governance and policy responses necessary to manage this growth. The result is degradation of the environment and societies.Figure upper-left: Between now and 2050 the global population is expected to increase from 6.9 billion to more than 9 billion, with 98% of this growth happening in cities and in the developing and emerging world, according to UN estimates.Figure middle-left: Most of the economic growth will happen in developing and emerging economies.Figure down-left: Many people in the developing and emerging world will be moving up the economic ladder toward a middle class standard of living consuming many more resources per capita.
  • Transition: The governance and policy responses to manage this growth often happen in silos and limited by short-term, localized political pressures. Continuing to invest in polluting or energy-inefficient types of infrastructure and opting for high-footprint consumer lifestyle preferences are examples of choices that are often characterized by inertia due to short-term goals and self interest.Figure upper-right: On the other side of the mirror, in terms of degradation, greenhouse gas emissions keep rising, especially in the developing world and in particular in BRIC countries, the nest top economies in terms of GDP.Figure middle-right: Environmental degradation also jeopardizes people’s quality of life. An accelerating use of natural resources are continuing to affect key ecosystem services, and freshwater in particular. People living in areas of severe water stress will significantly increase.
  • If we continue with business-as-usual – with growth and degradation, with most wealthy countries consuming more than their share of resources, and poorer countries following the resource-intensive development path of richer countries– we are going to be in trouble. Our analysis, carried out with the Global Footprint Network, shows that if we continue with business-as-usual we will be consuming the equivalent of 2.3 planets in 2050.Our analysis based on our pathway to 2050 has also shown that we can get to a world in 2050 that is consuming just over the equivalent of 1 planet by 2050 if we start today. So the good news is that we can get to a world in 2050 where some 9 billion people are living well, and within the limits of the planet. The bad news is that we are running out of time. So how can we bridge this gap?
  • The conclusion of the BAU outlook to 2050 is that the World is on an unsustainable track. Based on this statement, we developed a vision for 2050 answering the question: what the world could look like if humanity addresses the sustainability challenge? Our objective was to map out not what we think will be, nor what we fear will be, but what could be.Given the megatrends of climate change, global population growth and urbanization, and given the best efforts of business, governments and society, Vision 2050 is a picture of the best possible outcome for the human population and the planet it lives on over the next four decades.
  • This chart sums up the challenge of sustainable development: meeting human demands within the ecological limits of the planet. It is a snapshot showing how different countries perform according to the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP) Human Development Index (HDI) and Global Footprint Network’s Ecological Footprint. In countries to the left of the vertical line marking a score of less than 0.8 on the HDI, a high level of development, as defined by UNDP, has not been attained. Countries above the horizontal dotted line and to the right of the vertical line have achieved a high level of development but place more demand on nature than could be sustained if everyone in the world lived this way. In order to move toward a sustainable future the world will need to address all dimensions of this chart – the concepts of success and progress, the biocapacity available per person, as well as helping countries either improve their levels of development or reduce their ecological impact (several countries face both challenges).
  • A pathway was developed to connect this sustainable future with the present. The goal was to see what a real, global attempt at sustainable development – with all the radical policy and lifestyle changes this would entail – would mean for business and markets in general and for the individual participating sectors.
  • A pathway is a set of descriptions that illustrates the transition to a certain scenario, in this case Vision 2050. The pathway that we have identified is composed of nine elements that demonstrate that behavior change and social innovation are as crucial as better solutions and technological innovation.Although distinct, the elements also show the interconnectedness of issues such as water, food and energy – relationships that must be considered in an integrated and holistic way, with tradeoffs that must be understood and addressed.The pathway and its elements neither prescribe nor predict, but are plausible stories the companies have created by “backcasting”, working back from the vision for 2050 and identifying the changes needed to reach it.The nine elements, or critical areas in which actions need to be taken over the next four decades are values and behaviors, human development, economy, agriculture, forests, energy and power, buildings, mobility and materials. We have detailed our vision for 2050 in each of the nine elements with a clear measure of success for each of them. For example, for the energy and power element, our vision is that a secure and low carbon energy is widely available and used efficiently. Here, the measure of success is that CO2 emissions will have been halved.On the way to achieve this vision, we see two timeframes: the Turbulent Teens, from 2010 to 2020 and the Transformation Time, from 2020 to 2050.The Turbulent Teens is a period of energy and dynamism for the global vision of sustainability. It is a formative decade for the ideas and relationships that will take place in the 30 years to follow. During this period, it becomes clear that swift, radical and coordinated actions are required at many levels, by multiple partners.As part of these Turbulent Teens, we have identified several “must-haves”, things that need to happen to achieve our vision. These must-haves are specific to each element but they all talk about innovation, policies, financing or a deeper understanding of what is going on.In the Transformation Time, the traits formed during the first decade mature into more consistent knowledge, behavior and solutions. It is a period of growing consensus as well as wrenching change in many parts of society – climate, economic power, population – and a time for fundamental change in markets that redefines values, profits and success.
  • The nine elements, or critical areas in which actions need to be taken over the next four decades are values and behaviors, human development, economy, agriculture, forests, energy and power, buildings, mobility and materials.
  • We have detailed our vision for 2050 in each of the nine elements with a clear measure of success for each of them. For example, for the energy and power element, our vision is that a secure and low carbon energy is widely available and used efficiently. Here, the measure of success is that CO2 emissions will have been halved.
  • On the way to achieve this vision, we see two timeframes: the Turbulent Teens, from 2010 to 2020…The Turbulent Teens is a period of energy and dynamism for the global vision of sustainability. It is a formative decade for the ideas and relationships that will take place in the 30 years to follow. During this period, it becomes clear that swift, radical and coordinated actions are required at many levels, by multiple partners.
  • …and the Transformation Time, from 2020 to 2050.In the Transformation Time, the traits formed during the first decade mature into more consistent knowledge, behavior and solutions. It is a period of growing consensus as well as wrenching change in many parts of society – climate, economic power, population – and a time for fundamental change in markets that redefines values, profits and success.
  • As part of these Turbulent Teens, we have identified several “must-haves”, things that need to happen to achieve our vision. These must-haves are specific to each element but they all talk about innovation, policies, financing or a deeper understanding of what is going on.
  • The second element of the pathway is “Human development”.Vision: Our vision for 2050 is that the global populationhas begun to stabilize at around 9 billion, mainlydue to education, the economic empowerment of women and urbanization. All can meet their basic needs, including the need for dignified lives and meaningful roles in their communities.Turbulent Teens: The must haves to reach this vision include fairer terms of trade and the removal of unfair subsidies, large investments to improve infrastructure, particularly in poorer economies, and a better use of local knowledge strengths, capabilities and leadership. The turbulent teens will see governments, society and business agreeing that the best way to reverse the effect of global recession is to promote greener growth and to improve the living conditions of billions.Transformation Time: And indeed, the transformation time will see new trade regimes beginning to benefit many, creating new markets, industries and customers. They will create jobs and economic opportunities for billions, lifting many out of poverty and providing a healthy return for investors. Basic needs will be increasingly met, including universal access to hygiene, sanitation, clean water, air and energy, mobility, food security and healthcare. The effects of educating girls and women will continue to be seen around the world in the form of decreasing birth rates, decreasing child mortality, and improvements in family health, income and prosperity.
  • The sixth element of the pathway is “Energy and power”.Vision: Our vision for 2050: Global energy demand has increased, but secure and low-carbon energy is widely available and used efficiently. Global emissions from the energy and power sector have been reduced to 14 Gt of CO2 per year, roughly an 80% reduction from business-as usual projections.Turbulent Teens: This will require an international consensus on the effective management of greenhouse management and a global price for carbon.Transformation Time: The result in that emissions of greenhouse gases will peak early in the first decade of the transformation time and then decline. Net zero emission performance and design will progressively become the norm for new plants.Figure (up): The first figure shows the new energy mix that will arise according to the “450 scenario” developed by the OECD and the International Energy Agency. It will comprise around 50% renewables and about 25% for nuclear and fossil fuels equipped with carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 2030 onwards.Figure (down): The second figure shows the annual capacity additions needed to deliver this new energy mix (in green) according to the “Blue Map scenario”. R&D efforts make offshore wind and solar photovoltaics cost-competitive.
  • The forth element of the pathway is “Agriculture”.Vision: Our vision for 2050 is that a 21st version of the Green Revolution will have helped the larger 2050 population meet its nutrition needs, without associated increases in the amount of land of water used thanks to improved agricultural practices, water efficiency, new crop varieties and new technologies including biotechnologies.Turbulent Teens: In the Turbulent Teens A 21st century version of the Green Revolution begins. Unlike its input-intensive 20th century predecessor, this version is knowledge-intensive, and builds the capacity of farmers tomanage agricultural land for higher productivity and natural resource and input efficiency. In addition to knowledge, there is continued global improvement in the key resources farmers need: land, machinery and water, access to markets, credit, inputs and risk management.Transformation Time: In the Transformation Time, we see greenhouse gas emissions and water use in agriculture dramatically reduced. Efforts to promote freer, fairer trade in agriculture are succeeding, and agricultural subsidies are discontinued. World food security is an evermore important agenda item for policymakers, both for food safety concerns and to eliminate secondary trade barriers. Governments consult with the general public to build trust that food is being produced in a sustainable and ethical manner. Internationally acceptable, science-based registration standards for agricultural technologies are agreed upon. Restoration of degraded land for production of food, biofuel crops and timber is a common practice across the globe.Figure: The Green Revolution 2.0 that happens in the Turbulent Teens has significant impact in many countries, most notably in Africa, which missed out on the first Green Revolution and where agricultural productivity has been lagging as the figure shows. With better seed, fertilizer and crop protection chemicals, as well as education, dissemination and improvements in governance, we see the African farm productivity improving fivehold
  • Finally, the ninth and last element of the pathway is “Materials”.Vision: Our vision for 2050 is that the Material demand, consumption and production have been transformedto match the limits of non-renewable resources. Closed-loop recycling, making the concept of waste obsolete, is normal business practice, and societies have a circular approach to resources. Used products and materials can be reengineered to function again for multiple and distinct purposes or reduced to raw materials for manufacturing other products. Greenhouse gas emissions, energy and water use are no longer constraints on the materialsindustry.Turbulent Teens: This will especially require to develop design principles and production processes for closed-loop circular systems, but also to review the value chains. Co-innovation between producers and consumers to reduce material consumption will be another must have for achieving our vision. “Urban mining” (recycling aluminum, steel, concrete and aggregates) will be a growing business.Transformation Time: This will then lead to an increasing acceptance of the fact that people need to limit their use of non-renewable materials around five tonnes per person per year, down from 85 tonnes in the US in 2009. A complete range of new products will be offered, based on high longevity, low embodied water, and low-energy and material content.Figure: The figure shows the circular, closed loop design that will become a key strategy for industry.
  • In order to reach our vision for 2050, actions are required on many fronts – the most critical changes occur in terms of carbon and resources, costs and consumption. We will by 2050 need to have halved CO2 emissions from 2005 levels [- this should get us to 450ppm (IEA) and give us a 40-60% probability of limiting increase in global temperature to around 2 degrees Celsius. These targets may be revised as the science and impact of climate change advance.]But as well know it is important to remember it is about more than just carbon, so we also need to double agricultural output by 2050, increasing agricultural productivity by around 2% per year to meet rising demand for food and we need to do a lot more with a lot less to increase resource and material efficiency 4 to ten fold.In terms of costs – the key action to help close the gap is around internalizing the costs of carbon, water and major ecosystem services – which will in turn channel actions and investments towards more resource-efficient practices.Consumption is the third key lever that we need to pull [given the fact that more than 3 and a half billion people are likely to be considered middle class by 2030.] By enabling sustainable lifestyles through the provision of goods and services we can meet people’s needs, without bankrupting the planet.
  • The next slides focus on some of the opportunities that will arise in the period up to 2020 as societies move on to the pathway towards a sustainable future. As the world continues on this path beyond 2020, these opportunities will continue to grow in size.Here, business opportunities are defined as anything from which business can derive quantifiable benefits (throughobjective or subjective means) as well as the things that business and people are willing to pay for.
  • [Alternate slide]To better understand the opportunities and what it takes to realize them, the project has developed a high level overview of the spaces in which opportunities exist. This opportunity map is also an important tool for strategic thinking, dialogue and collaboration. It can be usedbetween management teams and the board, between executives and employees and as a challenge for innovation.With the population growing by 30 % between now and 2050 and nearly 70% percent of people expected to be living in urban areas it is clear that building and maintaining cities, infrastructure and livelihoods present opportunity for investments and opportunities. Improvingbiocapacity and managing ecosystems will also provide rich-ground for many businesses.It is also clear that different partnerships are needed to makethese opportunities happen. Looking at water as an example: According to a recent McKinsey report, by 2030 global water requirements could be 40 percent above current accessible, reliable supply. India’s annual water demand in 2030 will be 1,500 cubic km against the likely availability of 744 cubic km. However, the report forecasts that India’s annual water input through rainfall will be 3,840 cubic km. In short, double the water needed will be potentially available but would have to be tapped, stored and supplied to bridge the water deficit. Massive investments in integrated and smart water management systems will be needed to plug this gap. This will require public-private partnerships in urban development, cross-sector partnerships in solution development, demand-side efficiency and new financing mechanisms. To help much of this change happen represents a business idea for us. An asset manager – developing financing solutions.
  • In India alone some experts believe that 400 million people will move from rural to urban areas over the next 40 years—urbanization on a scale that took 1,000 years to happen in Europe. This pattern is going to be repeated all over the world.This means the expansion of urban areas – which presents significant opportunities for building and maintaining cities.Around US$ 40 trillion will be needed for investment in urban infrastructure worldwide by 2030 (according to Deutsche Bank) of which 22 billion alone will be required for water infrastructure alone, cities present a hot-bed of opportunity for most sectors – cement, mobility, water, technology, finance and so on.
  • Information and communication technologies (ICT) can make a major contribution to the global response to climate change by enabling energy and emissions savings in transportation, building, industrial, power and other systems. According to some estimates ICT could deliver up to a 15% reduction of business-as-usual emissions in 2020 (7.8 GtCO2e = gigatonnes of CO2 equivalent), representing a value of Euro 553 billion (US$ 872.3 billion) in energy and fuel saved and an additional Euro 91 billion (US$ 143.5 billion) in carbon saved assuming a cost of carbon of Euro 20/tonne, for a total of Euro 644 billion (US$ 1,015 billion) savings. This savings in CO2e is more than five times the size of the sector’s own footprint, and its size demonstrates the important role an advanced communications platform can play in the transition to a low-carbon economy.
  • As populations grow, age and climb up the economic ladder, significant opportunities will exist to helpimprove people’s livelihoods and lifestyles in a more sustainable way. Improving access to health andeducation as well as a more outcome focused approach to such services will improve the livelihoods of billionsof people in both rich and poor countries. Aging populations will also require specific solutions to ensurethey are cared for as well as able to continue pursuing opportunities and contributing to society. There arealso ways in which businesses can profit from creating and delivering products and services to the risingnumber of people in the middle class in a way that makes sustainable products the easier choice.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Vision
      2050
      The new agenda forbusiness
      Marcel Engel
      Managing Director, Regional Network
      Kiev, 30 August 2011
    • 2.                                                                                             
      Coalition of some 200 leading companies
      • Market capitalization: 8,000 BUSD
      • 3. Total member company employees:13 million
      • 4. Global outreach
      • 5. Supplies products and services to half of the world’s
      population every day
       
       
       
       
       
      World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)
    • 6. WBCSD’sRegional Network
      NHO (Norway)
      RBF (Poland)
      Business Europe
      respACT BCSD Austria
      Danish
      BCSD
      Excel Partnership (Canada)
      BCSD
      United Kingdom
      econsense (Germany)
      Korea
      BCSD
      Vernadsky Foundation
      (Russia)
      EpE (France)
      BCSD Mongolia
      Nippon Keidanren (Japan)
      United States BCSD
      FFA (Spain)
      CGLI (Canada/USA)
      BCSD Kazakhstan
      BCSD Hungary
      FE
      BCSD Spain
      CII (India)
      BCSD
      Turkey
      BCSD Taiwan
      BCSD Portugal
      BCSD Mexico
      CentraRSE Guatemala
      China
      BCSD
      SEV-BCSD Greece
      BCSD Croatia
      BCSD Honduras
      BCSD El Salvador
      APEQUE (Algeria)
      AEEC (Egypt)
      BEC
      (Hong Kong)
      BCSD Vietnam
      BCSD UAE
      uniRSE (Nicaragua)
      SumaRSE (Panama)
      Indonesia BCSD
      Curaçao BCSD
      BCSD Zimbabwe
      AED
      (Costa Rica)
      BCSD Pakistan
      TERI
      BCSD India
      PBE (Philippines)
      BCSD Bolivia
      BCSD Malaysia
      BCSD Colombia
      BCSD
      Sri Lanka
      BCSD Ecuador
      BCSD Brazil
      BCSD Thailand
      BCA (Australia)
      Peru 2021
      FEMA
      BCSD Mozambique
      BCSD Paraguay
      New Zealand
      BCSD
      DERES (Uruguay)
      NBI
      (South Africa)
      Acción RSE (Chile)
      BCSD Argentina
      3
    • 7. WBCSD Work Program
    • 8. Vision
      2050
      The new agenda for business
    • 9. A collaborative effort involving 29 companies
      6
    • 10. A global business dialogue
      Washington DC
      7
    • 11. The different steps of the Vision 2050 project
      8
    • 12. Business-as-usual Outlook to 2050“Humanity has largely had an explosive relationship with our planet; we can, and should, aim to make this a symbiotic one.”Michael Mack, Syngenta International AG
    • 13. A business-as-usual outlook to 2050: The Growth Story
      10
    • 14. A business-as-usual outlook to 2050: Environmental Degradation
      11
    • 15. World is on an unsustainable track
      BAU projection: We will consume 2.3 Earths in 2050
      12
      Sources: Global Footprint Network, WBCSD Vision 2050
    • 16. The Vision
      The Vision
      Vision 2050 is a business response to the challenges the world faces. It is a contribution that is intended to help shape the sustainability agenda, to catalyze action and to provide relevant stakeholders with a platform to bring about change.
    • 17. “In 2050, some 9 billion people live well, and within the limits of the planet”
      Meeting the dual goals of sustainability
      High human development and low ecological impact
      Source: © Global Footprint Network (2009). Data from Global Footprint Network National Footprint Accounts, 2009 Edition; UNDP Human Development Report, 2009
    • 18. Pathway to 2050
    • 19. The pathway to 2050 and its 9 elements
      Vision 2050
      2050
      Measures of success
      Transformation Time
      2040
      Opportunities
      2030
      Turbulent Teens
      2020
      “Must-haves”
      2010
      Human development
      Economy
      People’s values
      Agriculture
      Forests
      Energy & power
      Buildings
      Mobility
      Materials
      Today
    • 20. Vision 2050 Pathway: 9 elements
      17
    • 21. To a sustainable world in 2050
      To a sustainable world in 2050
      From business-as-usual
    • 22. To a sustainable world in 2050
    • 23. To a sustainable world in 2050
      To a sustainable world in 2050
    • 24. To a sustainable world in 2050
    • 25. Human development
      Vision for 2050: 9 billion met their basic needs and have dignified lives
      Turbulent teens: improved access to basic services for the poor, women empowerment, better infrastructure, open and fair trade
      Transformation time: inclusive growth creates opportunities and jobs for billions, and ensures universal access basic services
    • 26. Energy and power
      Vision for 2050: Secure and low-carbon energy widely available and CO2 emissions reduced by 50% (2005 levels)
      Turbulent teens: international consensus on management of greenhouse gases and a global price for carbon.
      Transformation time: Greenhouse gas emissions peak and decline
      World abatement of energy-related CO2 emissions in the 450 scenario
      A new energy mix to reduce CO2 emissions
      Source: International Energy Agency, World Energy Outlook 2009, © OECD/IEA 2009
    • 27. Agriculture
      Vision for 2050
      Enough food, water and biofuels through a new Green Revolution
      Turbulent teens
      Cultivating knowledge-intensive agriculture
      Transformation time
      Growth in global trade, crop yield and carbon management
      Africa’s yield growth has lagged behind other regions
      Cereal yield by region – 1960-2010
      Source: Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark, Realising the Potential of Africa’s Youth, 2009 (FAOSTAT)
    • 28. Materials
      Vision for 2050
      Not a particle of waste
      Turbulent teens
      Doing more with less
      Transformation time
      Closing the loop
      Eliminating waste by closing the material loop
      An alternative material life cycle
      Source: WBCSD
    • 29. Closing the gap: Reaching the vision
      26
      Vision 2050 – The new agenda for business
    • 30. Opportunities
    • 31. Business domains for the next decade – Opportunities and overlaps
    • 32. Building and maintaining cities
      Anticipated investment needs for urban infrastructure up to 2030 (US$ trillion)
      Lots of opportunities...
      Systems planning
      Water Technology
      Source: Booz Allen Hamilton, 2007
      Mobility
      Buildings
      Financing
      29
    • 33. Huge capacity additions needed for new energy mix
      30
      Source: IEA/OECD, 2009
    • 34. Energy infrastructure: ICT will play a key role in the transition to a low-carbon economy
      • ICT could deliver up to a 15% reduction of business-as-usual emissions in 2020
      • 35. This savings in CO2 emissions is more than five times the size of the sector’s own
    • Building & transforming livelihoods and lifestyles
      Products and services for aging populations
      By 2020 people aged 65and abovewill account for aboutone-fifthof the total global population
      From The Economist, 20 November 2010
    • 36. Conclusions
      Global challenges will become key strategic drivers for business and innovation
      Opportunities abound for those who turn sustainability into strategy
      The race towards more inclusive, low carbon and resource efficient economies is on
    • 37. The Green Race is on
      China
      • About to become the leader in the race
      • 38. Key component of next 5-Year Plan (2011-2015)
      • 39. Clean energy investment : No. 1 rank with 21% of the 162 billion USD invested globally in 2009
      • 40. Taking the lead on solar & wind
      India
      • Supplier of low cost solutions based on domestic demand from a large, poor population
    • The Green Race is on
      Korea
      • Largest share of economic stimulus devoted to “green” sector (80%)
      • 41. “1 of 5 Green Powerhouses globally”
      • 42. GGGI – Global Green Growth Institute
      Japan
      • Most energy efficient economy
      • 43. Has a good technology platform for green solutions
    • The Green Race is on
      EU
      • Market leader today on green technology exports (40% market share)
      • 44. 300% increase in R&D for green technologies in 2009
      • 45. Transformation of the internal market?
      US
      • Mobilizing the US innovation capability?
      • 46. Transformation of the home market?
    • More information www.wbcsd.org/web/vision2050.htm