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September 22, 2011

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  • 1. Going Beyond the Requirements
    Applying Universal Design Principles
    To Building Solutions
    To Product Design
  • 2. North America
    Technical Sales Specialists
    888 437 7477
    Häfele Showrooms
    New York
    Chicago
    Global Business Development
    Coordination in every country
    Häfele Worldwide
  • 3. Going Beyond the Requirements
    Applying Universal Design Principles
    To Building Solutions
    To Product Design
  • 4. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.
  • 5. The Learning ObjectivesFrom the prospective of Designers, their clients (the users) and manufacturers:
    The history and current status of requirements relating to accessibility and equality
    The importance of considering the existing needs and likely future needs of the client
    The opportunity to enrich the experience of users and add value to projects and products by applying the principles of universal design
    Influences that manufacturers face in developing products for market
    Coordinated system design can meet the aesthetic demands of designers, the installation demands of a contractor and the functional demands of the users
  • 6. Considering DesignConsidering DesignersConsidering RequirementsConsidering Users
    Considering ……The Challenges
    Considering …………………..The Opportunities
  • 7.
  • 8. Our bodies are not designed for “design”
    “Design” may discriminate against as many as 46% of us, who are functionally limited by age or disability.
    If all the products and environments are made with human-centered design, all of us can live a life full of opportunity and experience.
    Don’t try to fit your body to design-centered design
    Choose Universal Design
    Institute for Human Centered Design
  • 9. What must a Designer do?
    All projects are designed for target users
    User and user’s needs change over the lifetime of a project’s use
    Some projects are subject to legal requirements
    ADA Standards for Accessible Design need not limit the usability or aesthetic of a solution
    All projects benefit from the application of Universal Design Principles
    7 Principles of Universal Design ©
    Performance criteria developed by group of experts
    Center for Universal Design, NC State, 1995-1997
    Used to evaluate and educate:
    The characteristics of more usable products and environments
    Performance Criteria = Usable Results
    Some projects are impacted by the specific client/user
    Focus on the their identified limitations, abilities and disabilities
  • 10. What must a Designer do?
    All projects are designed for target users.
    User and user’s needs change over the lifetime of a project’s use
    Bild: Sparkasse
  • 11. Trace R&D Center, University of Wisconsin
    Institute for Human Centered Design
  • 12. Trace R&D Center, University of Wisconsin
    Institute for Human Centered Design
  • 13. Trace R&D Center, University of Wisconsin
    Institute for Human Centered Design
  • 14. Trace R&D Center, University of Wisconsin
    Courtesy: Trace R&D Center, University of Wisconsin
  • 15. Arthritis
    Back problems
    Heart disease
    Respiratory disease
    Only 2 to 3 million Americans use wheelchairs or scooters
    Out of approximately 54 million with a disability
    Source: Centers for Disease Control
    Most common reasons for functional limitation of adults in the US...
  • 16. Statutes (Laws)
    ADA – Americans with Disabilities Act
    ABA – Architectural Barriers Act
    Fair Housing Act
    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973
    Codes
    International Building Code
    Standards
    Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards
    ADA Standards for Accessible Design
    National Building Code of Canada Accessibility Requirements
    ICC/ANSI A117.1 Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities
    Subject to legal requirements?What MUST be done?
  • 17. Applying Universal Design – enhancing usefulness
    Larger Print
    Sliding Doors
    Drawers not hinged doors
    Adding Assistive Technologies – solving individual problems
    Eye Glasses
    Lower counter heights
    Motorized-adjustable work surfaces
    Subject to legal requirements?What MAY be done?
  • 18. Hard Fought Benefits of Regulations
    Major social and political steps to insure Civil Rights
    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the subsequent signing of regulations in 1977
    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) in 1990
    Photos: HolLynn D’Lil
    www.udeducation.org/resources/readings/welch.asp
  • 19. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 1990
    A direct extension of the Civil Rights Law of 1964.
    Codifying new concepts:
    Design as a Civil Right
    Inclusive Thinking/Design creates equality
    Lack of inclusive design creates inequality
  • 20. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) 1990
    New construction & alterations
    of private sector public accommodations and commercial facilities
    must comply with the ADA Standards for Accessible Design.
    New construction & alterations
    of state and local government facilities
    must comply with either the ADA Standards for Accessible Design
    or the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS)
    Jurisdiction of the Justice Department
    www.ada.gov
  • 21. Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines (ADAAG) 2004
    In 2004, the US Access Board issued revised and updated accessibility guidelines for buildings and facilities covered by ADA and the Architectural Barriers Act (ABA).
    These guidelines serve as the basis for enforceable standards issued by other federal agencies
    www.access-board.gov/ada-aba/index.htm
    The Board sought to harmonize the ADA and ABA Accessibility Guidelines with industry standards, particularly the International Building Code (IBC) and ICC/ANSI A117.1 Accessible and Usable Buildings and Facilities.
  • 22. Architectural Barriers Act (ABA) 1968
    Federal buildings are not covered under the ADA.
    The ABA requires access to facilities designed, built, altered, or leased with federal funds.
    It is one of the first endeavors to ensure access to the built environment.
    The Access Board develops and maintains accessibility guidelines under this law.
    Federal agencies responsible for adopting the guidelines as enforceable standards:
    Department of Defense
    Department of Housing and Urban Development
    General Services Administration
    U.S. Postal Service
  • 23. State and Local Codes
    Some states and local governments have their own unique accessibility codes
    (e.g. California and Massachusetts).
    Many states have adopted the International Building Code (IBC)
    www.access-board.gov/links/statecodes.htm
  • 24. Canada
    The National Building Code of Canada (NBC) is a model code that includes requirements for accessibility.
    www.nationalcodes.ca
    The NBC has no legal status until adopted by a province, territory or municipal government.
  • 25. “Universal Design”?
    “Barrier Free Design” – Germany
    From Wikipedia:
    Building modification consists of modifying buildings or facilities so that they can be used by the physically disadvantaged or disabled.
    The idea of barrier free modification has largely been superseded by the concept of universal design.
    Freeing a building of barriers means:
    Recognizing the features that could form barriers for some people
    Thinking inclusively about the whole range of impairments
    Reviewing everything - from structure to smallest detail
    Seeking feedback from users and learning from mistakes
  • 26. Universal Design?
    “Inclusive Design” – UK
    Architects and planners need a new design philosophy to put inclusion at the heart of the development process, The Commission For Architecture and The Built Environment (CABE) has urged at the launch of a report on equality, diversity and the built environment.
    Richard Simmons, CABE chief executive, warns that inequality is still literally being built into new places.
    “Even though accessibility has improved over the last decade, the fact remains that poor and disadvantaged people are far more likely to live in poor quality environments.”
    fromwww.cabe.org.uk/default.aspx?contentitemid=2893
  • 27. Universal Design?
    “Design for All” – EU
    There is a growing impact from the formation of the EU
    Availability of public funding is being linked to compliance to guidelines for accessibility
    “One way of helping to ensure that everyone can fully participate in the Information Society is for industry to design Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) products, services and applications that we all can use.”
  • 28. Enabling & Supporting?
    The United Nation’s Second World Assembly on Ageing:
    Madrid Political Declaration and International Plan of Action 2002
    Addressed the potent role of design in its Priority Direction III:
    Ensuring enabling and supporting environments
    The Priority incorporates as assumption that we’ve moved beyond barrier removal and accessibility to the language of ‘enabling and supporting.’
    From www.unis.unvienna.org/unis/pressrels/2002/soc4603.html
  • 29. 7 Principles of Universal Design ©
    1 Equitable Use
    2 Flexible Use
    3 Simple and Intuitive Use
    4 Perceptible Information
    5 Tolerance for Error
    6 Low Physical Effort
    Size and Space for Approach & Use
    www.design.ncsu.edu/cud
  • 30.
  • 31. What must a Designer do?
    Some projects are impacted by specific user needs
    Answering specific needs of a known client/user
    Combining the input of client/user, designers, expert users and consultants
    Combining the needs of all users
    Solutions are not limited to
    Regulatory requirements
    Standard offerings
    Focus on the identified needs
  • 32.
  • 33. Manufacturing Products:A continuous balance within a complex environment
    Fashion
    Lifestyle
    Design
    Society / Politics
    Architecture
    Economics
    Manufacturer
    Manufacturing
    Competences
    Available Technology
    Market and Competitors
    Complementary Markets
    Innovation
    Leadership
    Demand
    Response
    Functionality
    Testing
    Ideas
  • 34.
  • 35.
  • 36.
  • 37.
  • 38.
  • 39.
  • 40.
  • 41.
  • 42. Designing Solutions
  • 43. Bathroom & Washroom Products for Accessibility AccessoriesKitchen HardwareDoor HardwareFunctionality for Living
  • 44. Equitable Use
  • 45. Equitable Use
  • 46. Equitable Use
  • 47. Equitable Use
  • 48. Equitable Use
  • 49. Equitable Use
  • 50. Flexibility in Use
  • 51. Flexibility in Use
  • 52. Flexibility in Use
  • 53. Flexibility in Use
  • 54. Motorization
    Motorization
    54
    Flexibility in Use
  • 55. Motorization
    Motorization
    55
    Flexibility in Use
  • 56. Motorization
    Motorization
    56
    Flexibility in Use
  • 57. Motorization
    Motorization
    57
    Flexibility in Use
  • 58. 58
    Motorization
    Motorization
    Flexibility in Use
  • 59. 59
    Motorization
    Motorization
    Flexibility in Use
  • 60. 60
    Motorization
    Motorization
    Flexibility in Use
  • 61. Flexibility in Use
  • 62. Flexibility in Use
  • 63. Flexibility in Use
  • 64. Flexibility in Use
  • 65. Flexibility in Use
  • 66. Flexibility in Use
  • 67. Flexibility in Use
  • 68. Flexibility in Use
  • 69. Simple and Intuitive Use
  • 70. Simple and Intuitive Use
  • 71. Simple and Intuitive Use
  • 72. 4.13.9* Door Hardware. 
    Handles, pulls, latches, locks, and other operating devices on accessible doors shall have a shape that is easy to grasp with one hand and does not require tight grasping, tight pinching, or twisting of the wrist to operate.
    Lever-operated mechanisms, push-type mechanisms, and U-shaped handles are acceptable designs.
    When sliding doors are fully open, operating hardware shall be exposed and usable from both sides.
    The citation from ADAAG ADA Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities
  • 73. Simple and Intuitive Use
  • 74. Simple and Intuitive Use
  • 75. Simple and Intuitive Use
  • 76. Perceptible Information
  • 77. Perceptible Information
    EMERGENCY EXIT
  • 78. Perceptible Information
    EMERGENCY EXIT
  • 79. Perceptible Information
    EMERGENCY EXIT
  • 80. Perceptible Information
  • 81. Perceptible Information
  • 82. Perceptible Information
  • 83. Perceptible Information
  • 84. Perceptible Information
  • 85. Perceptible Information
  • 86. Tolerance for Error
  • 87. Tolerance for Error
  • 88. Tolerance for Error
  • 89. Tolerance for Error
  • 90. Tolerance for Error
  • 91. Low Physical Effort
  • 92. Low Physical Effort
  • 93. Low Physical Effort
  • 94. Size and Space for Approach & Use
  • 95. Size and Space for Approach & Use
  • 96. Size and Space for Approach & Use
  • 97. Considering DesignConsidering DesignersConsidering RequirementsConsidering Users
    Considering …………………..The Opportunities
  • 98. Designing Systems
  • 99. Designing Systems
  • 100. Designing Systems
  • 101. Polyamid
    Aluminium
    Edelstahl
    Designing Systems
  • 102. Designing Systems
  • 103. Designing Systems
  • 104. Designing Systems
  • 105. Designing Systems
  • 106. Designing Systems
  • 107. This program is registered with the AIA/CES for continuing professional education. As such, it does not include content that may be deemed or construed to be an approval or endorsement by the AIA of any material of construction or any method or manner of handling, using, distributing, or dealing in any material or product. Questions related to specific materials, methods, and services will be addressed at the conclusion of this presentation.
  • 108. Accessibility Planning Guide
    Regulations
    Applying Universal Design Principles
    Individual Needs
  • 109. www.hafele.com
    www.hewi.de
    www.hawa.ch
    www.eku.ch
    www.design.ncsu.edu/cud
    www.access-board.gov/ada-aba/
    www.cabe.org.uk/default.aspx?contentitemid=2893
    www.udeducation.org/resources/readings/welch.asp
    www.humancentereddesign.org
  • 110. www.humancentereddesign.org
  • 111. Institute for Human Centered Design*
    An international, educational, nonprofit organization dedicated to enhancing the experiences of people of all ages and abilities through excellence in design.
    www.humancentereddesign.org
    *Name changed on 30th anniversary in 2008 from Adaptive Environments
  • 112. Going Beyond the Requirements
    Applying Universal Design Principles
    To Building Solutions
    To Product Design