0
Christine Sharbrough, MSLIS, CGSM
Welcome!Librarian? Teacher? Genealogist? Other?Understanding the genealogist & geni-speakUnderstanding resources sough...
Novice or true beginnerUnwitting inheritorIntermediateName collectorScholarly researcherHistorian
Help (I don’t know what to do)How do I make sense of this?Where do I go next?Names – preferably royalty and heroesCon...
Every family is differentEvery researcher is at a different point of discoveryResearchers come at problems differently...
Most difficult to discernThink about where the patron is in terms of “type”What are they hoping to find?What do they n...
(Most of) Our relatives would rather…Watch paint dryWatch grass growHave fingernails pulled out with pliers; orHave b...
“Go from what you know to what you don’t”Not fun, but necessaryCannot accurately research without documentingeach link ...
Do not be distracted by facts or storiesPeople are excitedResearch is very personalThe first question asked is not usu...
Vital Records (time period is key)Census Records (federal and state)Land/Property mapsLocal newspapersCemetery record...
You have access to more than you may realizePhysical and virtual materialsPhysical:Genealogical reference materialsLo...
• Vital records• MAVR to 1850, MAVR 1850-1915; Copley books (NH),NH State Papers; Barbour Collection (CT)• Local, county h...
The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy – ValGreenwood (3rded.)Ancestry’s Red Book (3rded.)Map Guide to the 1790-1...
Create a finding aid/research gridWhat/Time Period/Information containedWhat do you have in the building?What do you s...
Basic understanding of the roles of:Public librariesHistorical societiesArchives (National, State, Local, Corporate, M...
Live and die by circs and/or usage of collectionsCome in and have a great experienceTell their friends…at large confere...
Create genealogy page on websiteInclude finding aidsFAQRefer people to itHotlink resources (catalog, etc.)
You don’t need to know it all, just where to find it…Inventory your local history collectionCompiled Genealogies “Histo...
• Basic Forms• Brochure – short version of annotatedbibliography/finding aid• Bibliography/finding aid/research grid• List...
Forms PacketPedigree chart (direct line ancestors)Family group sheet (all information on one family)Correspondence Log...
Ancestry.comFold3.com (formerly Footnote.com)Genealogybank.comAmericanAncestors.orgHeritageQuestOnline.comLegacy.com...
Library edition does not offer online family trees likepersonal subscription doesNo access to personal family treesPatr...
Most basic programs are freeLegacy Family Tree (www.legacyfamilytree.com)RootsMagic (www.rootsmagic.com)Family Tree Ma...
Staffing/timeGetting startedGetting organizedKeeping upHow much are you willing/able to do?“We’re able to get you st...
Who’s who in genealogy?Blogs/eNewsletters/Websites/HangoutsDick EastmanDear MyrtleThomas MacEntee – GeneabloggersEli...
Do your own genealogical researchBecome really great friends with someone who doescsharbrough@mvlc.orgGenearchibrarian...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Assisting genealogists in the Library

101

Published on

NERGC Presentation April 17, 2013. Enjoy!

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
101
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Assisting genealogists in the Library"

  1. 1. Christine Sharbrough, MSLIS, CGSM
  2. 2. Welcome!Librarian? Teacher? Genealogist? Other?Understanding the genealogist & geni-speakUnderstanding resources sought and ownedSifting through the story to get the questionTools, terminology, techniquesKeeping up
  3. 3. Novice or true beginnerUnwitting inheritorIntermediateName collectorScholarly researcherHistorian
  4. 4. Help (I don’t know what to do)How do I make sense of this?Where do I go next?Names – preferably royalty and heroesConfirmation/VerificationHistory/ContextFree information
  5. 5. Every family is differentEvery researcher is at a different point of discoveryResearchers come at problems differentlyResearch focus differs from person to personMost librarians are not trained as genealogistsMany librarians/library staff have no idea what is inthat local history room.Most people fear the unknownIf one person asks, ten more want to know
  6. 6. Most difficult to discernThink about where the patron is in terms of “type”What are they hoping to find?What do they need to do first?When in doubt – ask for clarificationThe Reference Interview is your friend
  7. 7. (Most of) Our relatives would rather…Watch paint dryWatch grass growHave fingernails pulled out with pliers; orHave bamboo shoved under them…soWe have conferences…and we go to the libraryIf you work in a library…you must like books, ergo…youmust like research… and hearing about mine…right?Getting to the heart of the matter without being heartless“What question would you like to try and answer today?”
  8. 8. “Go from what you know to what you don’t”Not fun, but necessaryCannot accurately research without documentingeach link of the chainNo one wants to hear thisSuccess of this route depends on who’s standing infront of youUnderstanding what they want to know and knowingwhere records/resources are that will answer thequestion
  9. 9. Do not be distracted by facts or storiesPeople are excitedResearch is very personalThe first question asked is not usually the one theywant answered…for example…“I want the book on my family”“My 4thgreat grandfather, Edward Spaulding, was oneof the founding families of Chelmsford. He is buriedhere according to a genealogy I read. He died in 1701.What cemeteries are in town?”
  10. 10. Vital Records (time period is key)Census Records (federal and state)Land/Property mapsLocal newspapersCemetery recordsMilitary recordsHow do I do…Where do I find…
  11. 11. You have access to more than you may realizePhysical and virtual materialsPhysical:Genealogical reference materialsLocal history collection“Regular” history collectionMagazines (Family Tree, American Ancestors, ?)DVDs (WDYTYA, Gates)Virtual:Databases, online sites
  12. 12. • Vital records• MAVR to 1850, MAVR 1850-1915; Copley books (NH),NH State Papers; Barbour Collection (CT)• Local, county histories• Local property maps and Sanborn Fire Maps• Local and regional newspapers• Genealogy Bank/Newsbank• Genealogical reference books• Cemetery records• Local transcriptions, Findagrave.com
  13. 13. The Researcher’s Guide to American Genealogy – ValGreenwood (3rded.)Ancestry’s Red Book (3rded.)Map Guide to the 1790-1920 Censuses – Thorndaleand DollarhideThe SourceReading Early American Handwriting – Kip SperryEvidence Explained – Elizabeth Shown Mills
  14. 14. Create a finding aid/research gridWhat/Time Period/Information containedWhat do you have in the building?What do you subscribe to online?What dates do these records cover?What do area libraries have?What major repositories are in the area?Local/regional genealogy groups?Archives?List of local researchers?
  15. 15. Basic understanding of the roles of:Public librariesHistorical societiesArchives (National, State, Local, Corporate, Museum)What type of information sought?Person, place or entity?Specialty library
  16. 16. Live and die by circs and/or usage of collectionsCome in and have a great experienceTell their friends…at large conferencesArchivists – researchers know the collection better thanthe staff do sometimes because they have the time to lookat things in detailGreat help creating finding aids and vetting them.• NB: Pathway to NF and fiction– Dan Waddell– Rhett McPherson– 970s (history), 364.1 (true crime), 780s (true life adventure)DO NOT BE AFRAID! WE WON’T HURT YOU…REALLY
  17. 17. Create genealogy page on websiteInclude finding aidsFAQRefer people to itHotlink resources (catalog, etc.)
  18. 18. You don’t need to know it all, just where to find it…Inventory your local history collectionCompiled Genealogies “History of Adams Family”“Researching your British Ancestors”“Massachusetts Vital Records to 1850”Shelf listActually open the books/login to databases/PLAYNote what they contain – names? Descriptions?Transcriptions?Annotated bibliography/finding aidTrain staff how to field questionsAppoint someone to be point person
  19. 19. • Basic Forms• Brochure – short version of annotatedbibliography/finding aid• Bibliography/finding aid/research grid• List of online resources – subscription and free• Basic understanding of limitations of resources• Basic information about genealogy software programs
  20. 20. Forms PacketPedigree chart (direct line ancestors)Family group sheet (all information on one family)Correspondence Log (tracking what was done/who wascontacted)FREE: www.familytreemagazine.com &www.ancestry.comInformation SheetWebsites (access at home and at the library)Other “where to go” resources – locally, regionallyNEHGS, National Archives, ACGS (Manchester, NH)List of local researchers
  21. 21. Ancestry.comFold3.com (formerly Footnote.com)Genealogybank.comAmericanAncestors.orgHeritageQuestOnline.comLegacy.comFamilySearch.orgFindagrave.comMidwest Genealogy Library (mymcpl.org)Google Books
  22. 22. Library edition does not offer online family trees likepersonal subscription doesNo access to personal family treesPatrons can subscribe monthly or bi-annually to haveaccess to a personal siteDownload a GEDCOM
  23. 23. Most basic programs are freeLegacy Family Tree (www.legacyfamilytree.com)RootsMagic (www.rootsmagic.com)Family Tree Maker (Ancestry – personal subscriptiononly)FamilySearch = New Family Tree(www.familysearch.org)Various levels of collaboration and source citation
  24. 24. Staffing/timeGetting startedGetting organizedKeeping upHow much are you willing/able to do?“We’re able to get you started” versus “We will do theresearch for you.”Guidelines provide consistencyLeave the desk with something to do/somewhere togo
  25. 25. Who’s who in genealogy?Blogs/eNewsletters/Websites/HangoutsDick EastmanDear MyrtleThomas MacEntee – GeneabloggersElizabeth Shown Mills - Evidence ExplainedFamily History Library AffiliationFamilySearch.org Wiki/Learn – online classesFamily Tree MagazineLook at major conferences: NGS, FGS, NERGC
  26. 26. Do your own genealogical researchBecome really great friends with someone who doescsharbrough@mvlc.orgGenearchibrarian.wordpress.com
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×