Policy presentation UNPFII 2011

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During the 10th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York from the 16 to the 27 May 2011, FAO presented to civil society, Indigenous leaders, Member States, and fellow UN Agencies the new FAO Policy on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples, adopted in August of 2010.

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  • c) Rationale for the policy and Objectives for engagement The following objectives express the commitment of FAO to better respond to the needs and concerns of indigenous peoples. They are based on the Organization’s strengths and comparative advantages and within its overall mandate towards ensuring humanity’s freedom from hunger.
  • Development of the Policy 2005 : Work on FAO’s Policy on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples begins. A comprehensive draft strategic framework is completed in close collaboration with indigenous consultants. Its aim was to provide a framework for developing an FAO corporate vision and policy to engage with its Member States and indigenous peoples. Due to reorganization within FAO at the time, however, the process was stalled and the development of a policy delayed. 2007-2008 : Motivated by the adoption of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) in September 2007, the development of the policy was revisited based on the afore-mentioned draft strategic framework . In close consultation with members of FAO’s Working Group on Indigenous Issues, a preliminary draft policy was developed and reviewed through a global consultation which involved indigenous representatives, FAO staff and management, and experts. Comments were also provided by other UN agencies and the UNPFII. 2009 : FAO’s draft policy on indigenous and tribal peoples is finalized. On occasion of the parallel Civil Society Forum which took place alongside the World Food Summit in November 2009, an “open dialogue” was organized between indigenous representatives and FAO’s Working Group on Indigenous Issues to further discuss the policy and move towards a closer relationship. 2010 : Formal clearance of the policy is sought. All FAO directors in headquarters and decentralized offices are involved. Finally, the Policy is reviewed by the Director General’s cabinet and approved in August 2010.
  • Policy: Content and Purpose The central purpose of the policy is to provide a framework to guide FAO’s work where indigenous peoples are concerned. It is structured generally as follows: Background information- gives information about indigenous peoples’ livelihoods, world views and concerns about development b) Core principles- defines certain values and rights to which indigenous peoples are entitled by international law, and which should be at the basis of joint activities
  • c) Rationale for the policy and Objectives for engagement The following objectives express the commitment of FAO to better respond to the needs and concerns of indigenous peoples. They are based on the Organization’s strengths and comparative advantages and within its overall mandate towards ensuring humanity’s freedom from hunger.
  • c) Rationale for the policy and Objectives for engagement The following objectives express the commitment of FAO to better respond to the needs and concerns of indigenous peoples. They are based on the Organization’s strengths and comparative advantages and within its overall mandate towards ensuring humanity’s freedom from hunger.
  • d) Priority areas of work- identifies certain areas in which FAO specializes and which constitute the most feasible opportunities for collaboration Natural resources, environment and genetic resources Example: The 2001 International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture, whose objectives are the conservation and sustainable use of plant genetic resources for food and agriculture and the fair and equitable sharing of benefits derived from their use. The International Treaty formally recognizes the enormous contribution that local and indigenous communities and farmers of all regions have made and will continue to make to the conservation and development of the resources that constitute the basis of the world’s food and agriculture production. It calls on States to acknowledge this reality and support the efforts of these communities. 2) Climate change and bionenergy Example: UN REDD United Nations Collaborative initiative on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD) in developing countries (launched in 2008). The establishment of a dialogue mechanism with indigenous peoples as well as other stakeholders has been integrated. 3) Land and territories Example: Land delimitation project in Angola; San community awarded legal entitlement to ancestral territory in 2007. 4) Food security, nutrition and the right to food - Example: Collaboration between FAO and CINE (Center for Indigenous Peoples’ Nutrition and Environment): documented 12 case studies of indigenous peoples’ food systems from Canada, Japan, Peru, India, Nigeria, Colombia, Thailand, Kenya and the Federated States of Micronesia. Prove that traditional foods are more nutritious. The first phase concentrated on the documentation of local indigenous food systems whereas phase two is concentrating on the implementation of health promotion interventions using culturally sensitive practices and revival of traditional food practices. - Example 2: INFOODS Journal of Food Composition and Analysis regularly reports findings on the nutrition composition of non-cultivated, non-commercial foods from various regions around the world. For ex. foods that have been documented include the ivy gourd and wild betel leaves, both of which are used by the Karen People in Thailand. 5) Communication and knowledge systems - Example: Over the last years, FAO has promoted numerous initiatives in the field of indigenous peoples’ Communication for Development (ComDev). These have proven to be strategic in supporting sustainable livelihoods and self-determined development. One of the main activities has been the establishment of regional participatory communication platforms of indigenous peoples, such as the Plataforma Indigena in Latin America (www.plataformaindigena.org) and K-Net in Canada ( http://www.knet.ca/ ). Led by CIDOB ( Confederación de Pueblos Indígenas de Bolivia ) and supported by FAO, the Plataforma Indigena aims to support indigenous peoples’ self-determined development through access to a participatory platform. Within this framework, the platform constitutes a channel for exchange of knowledge, proposals and mechanisms for coordination and cooperation among different stakeholders committed to indigenous peoples’ rights and concerns. In 2009, FAO and the Italian Ministry of the Environment and Territory launched the joint Communication for Sustainable Development Initiative (CSDI), which applies communication strategies and approaches to climate change adaptation, sustainable natural resources Management (NRM) and food security. 6) Cultural and biological diversity - Example: GIAHS (Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems)- In 2002 FAO launched this initiative in partnership with many others [1] to help with the conservation and adaptive management of unique traditional agricultural systems from around the world. Among other things, it works to empower farmers and indigenous peoples so that their traditional practices and livelihoods are not lost. Pilot sites exist in Peru, Chile, Kenya and Tanzania (where they work directly with indigenous peoples) as well as in China, Philippines, Tunisia, and Algeria. [1] Partners include UNDP, UNESCO, WHC, ICCROM, CGIARs, IUCN, NGOs and other international institutions, universities, private sector and civil society organisations, as well as interested donors. 7) Economic opportunity for sustainable livelihoods - Example: H onduras- Under a three-year project entitled “Creativity and Cultural Identity for Local Development,” FAO is collaborating with other UN agencies to promote respect for local culture and to create economic opportunities based on cultural characteristics. FAO’s main role is to support rural and indigenous communities in developing small business activities to sell cultural products to the tourism market, based on the idea of ‘development with culture and identity.’
  • e) Mechanisms for implementation- Identifies areas in which FAO specializes and which constitute the most feasible opportunities for collaboration and action. Policy Dialogue and the development of normative instruments: FAO acts as a neutral voice to bring people together and to advise member countries on how to implement strategies and plans that improve the conditions creating hunger and poverty. It also works to develop international instruments and treaties which set standards and offer guidelines on how to pursue different aspects of sustainable development. Field Programme: FAO provides on-the-ground technical support to countries all over the world. Field projects relate to FAO’s specific mandate on food security and agriculture, covering areas such as crop production, forestry, fisheries, livestock and socio-economic aspects of development. Advocacy and knowledge generation: FAO serves as a knowledge organization. It counts on the expertise of numerous different professionals- agronomists, foresters, fisheries and livestock specialists, nutritionists, social scientists, economists, statisticians and others- to collect, analyse and disseminate data to be used in development efforts. This information is used to raise awareness, set standards, and inform policy and field activities for more effective assistance.
  • Next steps - Establish mechanisms to begin implementation of the policy in member countries and at FAO headquarters, at first through awareness raising and capacity development activities, and then through more project oriented work - Develop guidelines for FAO staff on how to integrate indigenous issues and rights into projects and programmes - Strengthen relationships and collaboration with indigenous peoples’ representatives in order to elicit support and input - Find extra-budgetary funding to support the implementation process.
  • Policy presentation UNPFII 2011

    1. 1. FAO POLICY ON INDIGENOUS AND TRIBAL PEOPLES UNPFII, 10 th Session, 2011
    2. 2. <ul><li>“ The central purpose of the policy is to provide a framework to guide FAO’s work where indigenous peoples are concerned” </li></ul><ul><li>“ As an organization which specializes in rural poverty reduction and food security, it is imperative for FAO to consider indigenous peoples as fundamental stakeholders and partners in development” </li></ul><ul><li>“ FAO aspires to play an important role in the international c ommunity’s efforts to ensure a better life for indigenous pe oples and rural populations. The fight against hunger can not be won without them” </li></ul>The Policy: words from Dr. Diouf
    3. 3. <ul><li>2005 : Work on the Policy begins. A draft strategic framework is completed in close collaboration with indigenous consultants. </li></ul><ul><li>2 007-2008 : The development of the policy is revisited and a preliminary draft prepared by FAO’s Working Group on indigenous issues and partners. An external consultation is launched. </li></ul><ul><li>2009 : A draft of the policy is finalized and discussed at an “open d ialogue” held during the Civil Society Forum (November 2009), in pa rallel to the World Food Summit. </li></ul><ul><li>2010 : For mal clearance is sought. In August 2010 the policy is approved by the Director General’s cabinet. </li></ul>DEVELOPMENT OF THE POLICY: A BRIEF HISTORY
    4. 4. <ul><li>A) Background information </li></ul><ul><li>Gives information about indigenous peoples’ livelihoods, world views and concerns about development </li></ul><ul><li>B) Core principles </li></ul><ul><li>Development with Identity </li></ul><ul><li>Free, Prior and Informed Consent </li></ul><ul><li>Participation and Inclusion </li></ul><ul><li>Rights over land and other natural resources </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural rights </li></ul><ul><li>Collective rights </li></ul><ul><li>Gender equality </li></ul>POLICY: CONTENT AND PURPOSE
    5. 5. <ul><li>C) Objectives for engagement </li></ul><ul><li>FAO will improve its institutional environment and capacities to respond to and collaborate with indigenous peoples and their organizations. </li></ul><ul><li>FAO will enhance the capacity of governments to engage indigenous peoples at the national and international level, in pursuance of their rights and visions of development. </li></ul>POLICY: CONTENT AND PURPOSE
    6. 6. <ul><li>FAO will integrate indigenous peoples’ issues into the normative and operational areas of its work, supporting indigenous peoples and their traditional agriculture, food and livelihoods systems. </li></ul><ul><li>FAO will facilitate the direct and effective participation of indigenous peoples in current and future FAO programmes and activities that affect indigenous peoples. </li></ul>Objectives (continued)
    7. 7. <ul><li>FAO will establish measures to collaborate with indigenous peoples and discourage ventures that will have adverse impact on their communities . </li></ul><ul><li>FAO will approach indigenous peoples in a way that answers to, interacts with and learns from their unique food and agriculture practices, livelihood systems and specific socio-cultural circumstances, thus building on their potential contributions and actively encouraging ‘ development with identity .’ </li></ul>Objectives (continued)
    8. 8. <ul><li>FAO activities that affect indigenous peoples will be guided by the human rights-based approach to development , premised on the notion that everyone should live in dignity and attain the highest standards of humanity guaranteed by international human rights law. </li></ul>Objectives (continued)
    9. 9. <ul><li>Natural resources, environment and genetic resources </li></ul><ul><li>Climate change and bio-energy </li></ul><ul><li>Land and territories </li></ul><ul><li>Food security, nutrition and the right to food </li></ul><ul><li>Communication and knowledge systems </li></ul><ul><li>Cultural and biological diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Economic opportunity for sustainable livelihoods </li></ul>D) Priority Areas of Work
    10. 10. <ul><li>Policy Dialogue and the development of normative instruments </li></ul><ul><li>Field Programme </li></ul><ul><li>Advocacy and knowledge generation </li></ul>E) Mechanisms for Implementation
    11. 11. <ul><ul><li>FUTURE STEPS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Within FAO </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Policy implementation: awareness raising, capacity development, integration of indigenous issues into FAO project, programme and policy work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop guidelines for FAO staff on how to integrate indigenous issues into projects and programmes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>• Externally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strengthen relationships and collaboration with indigenous peoples’ representatives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Outreach, policy dialogue and awareness raising with partners at all levels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop proposal for funding to support the implementation process and future programme of work </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Thank you!

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