Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ch 32 Radiation, Nuclear Energy, and Particles

3,306

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
3,306
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
85
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 32 Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles
  • 2. AP Learning Objectives
    • Nuclear Physics
    • Nuclear reactions (including conservation of mass number and charge)
      • Students should understand the significance of the mass number and charge of nuclei, so they can:
        • Interpret symbols for nuclei that indicate these quantities.
        • Use conservation of mass number and charge to complete nuclear reactions.
        • Determine the mass number and charge of a nucleus after it has undergone specified decay processes.
      • Students should know the nature of the nuclear force, so they can compare its strength and range with those of the electromagnetic force.
      • Students should understand nuclear fission, so they can describe a typical neutron-induced fission and explain why a chain reaction is possible.
  • 3. AP Learning Objectives
    • Nuclear Physics
    • Mass-energy equivalence
      • Students should understand the relationship between mass and energy (mass-energy equivalence), so they can:
        • Qualitatively relate the energy released in nuclear processes to the change in mass.
        • Apply the relationship  E = (  m)c 2 in analyzing nuclear processes.
  • 4. Table Of Contents
    • Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (AP?)
    • Induced Nuclear Reactions
    • Nuclear Fission
    • Nuclear Reactors
    • Nuclear Fusion
    • Elementary Particles
    • Cosmology
  • 5. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 1: Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (AP?)
  • 6. Biological Effects of Radiation Ionizing radiation consists of photons and/or moving particles that have sufficient energy to knock and electron out of an atom or molecule, thus forming an ion. Exposure is a measure of the ionizing radiation produced in air by X-rays or γ -rays. In passing through the air, the beam produces positive ions whose total charge is q . Exposure is the charge per unit mass of the air.
  • 7. Absorbed Dose For biological purposes, the absorbed dose is a more suitable quantity because it is the energy absorbed from the radiation per unit mass of the absorbing material: gray
  • 8. Differences in effect To compare the damage produced by different types of radiation, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is used.
  • 9. Effect on Organisms The product of the absorbed dose and the RBE is the biologically equivalent dose:
  • 10. 32.1.1. Ionizing radiation can be harmful to living things because of which of the following reasons? a) Cells may be destroyed by the thermal energy released by radioactive decay. b) Cells may be damaged by nuclear fusion occurring within them. c) Cells may be damaged by nuclear fission occurring within them. d) Cells may be damaged by fast moving helium nuclei, electrons, or very high frequency photons. e) Cells may be damaged by the beta decay of .
  • 11. 32.1.2. What is the absorbed dose of fast neutrons (RBE = 9.5) that is biologically equivalent to 75 rad of slow neutrons (RBE = 2.0)? a) 350 rad b) 120 rad c) 16 rad d) 48 rad e) 5.0 rad
  • 12. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 2: Induced Nuclear Reactions
  • 13. Nuclear Reaction vs Decay A nuclear reaction is said to occur whenever the incident nucleus, particle, or photon causes a change to occur in the target nucleus.
  • 14. Example 3 An Induced Nuclear Transmutation An alpha particle strikes an aluminum nucleus. As a result, and unknown nucleus and a neutron are produced.
  • 15. Induced Nuclear Reaction An induced nuclear reaction in which uranium is transmuted into plutonium.
  • 16. 32.2.1. Consider the following nuclear reaction: . The symbol “ d ” indicates a deuterium nucleus . Which one of the following statements is true concerning particle X in this reaction? a) X must be an alpha particle. b) X must be a photon. c) X must be two protons. d) X must be two neutrons. e) X must also be a deuterium nucleus.
  • 17. 32.2.2. Consider the following nuclear reaction: . Which one of the following statements is true concerning particle X in this reaction? a) X must be an alpha particle. b) X must be a photon. c) X must be a proton. d) X must be a neutron. e) X must be an electron.
  • 18. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 3: Nuclear Fission
  • 19. Nuclear Fission A slowly moving neutron causes the uranium nucleus to fission into barium, krypton, and three neutrons.
  • 20. Conceptual Example 5 Thermal Neutrons Versus Thermal Protons or Alpha Particles Why is it possible for a thermal neutron to penetrate a nucleus, whereas a proton or alpha particle would need a much larger amount of energy? Neutron has not electromagnetic repulsion
  • 21. A chain reaction
  • 22. Chain Reaction In a controlled chain reaction, only one neutron, on average, causes another neutron to fission.
  • 23. 32.3.1. In the process known as nuclear fission, which of the following occurs? a) Two nuclei with atomic numbers less than that of iron are combined. b) Two nuclei with atomic numbers greater than that of iron are combined. c) A nucleus with an atomic number less than that of iron is split. d) A nucleus with an atomic number greater than that of iron is split. e) A nucleus with an atomic number much greater than that of iron is split by an alpha particle or a very low frequency photon.
  • 24. 32.3.2. Consider the following nuclear reaction: What is X in this reaction? a) b) c) d) e)
  • 25. 32.3.3. How many neutrons are released in the following reaction: a) 1 b) 3 c) 6 d) 8 e) 12
  • 26. 32.3.4. How much energy is released in the following reaction: a) 78.2 MeV b) 96.1 MeV c) 126.5 MeV d) 140.8 MeV e) 177.9 MeV
  • 27. 32.3.5. Why is it that neutrons induce nuclear fission reactions better than protons do? a) The nucleus exerts a repulsive force on the proton, but not on the neutron. b) With more mass, neutrons have greater momentum than protons. c) It is difficult to produce enough protons for the reaction to occur. d) Neutrons experience the attractive strong nuclear force, whereas protons do not experience this force.
  • 28. 32.3.6. Which one of the following quantities is not necessarily conserved in nuclear reactions? a) number of protons b) electric charge c) angular momentum d) linear momentum e) number of protons and neutrons
  • 29. 32.3.7.What is the origin of the energy that is released in a nuclear fission process? a) electrostatic repulsion of neutrons b) weak nuclear force c) Coulomb energy of protons and electrons d) electrostatic repulsion of protons e) energy of the thermal neutrons
  • 30. 32.3.8. Which one of the following statements best explains why light nuclei do not undergo nuclear fission? a) Light nuclei cannot be radioactive. b) Light nuclei cannot absorb thermal neutrons. c) Light nuclei do not have neutrons. d) Light nuclei have a much higher binding energy than heavy nuclei. e) Fission of a light nucleus would result in a reduction of the binding energy, rather than an increase.
  • 31. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 4: Nuclear Reactors
  • 32. Nuclear Reactors A nuclear reactor consists of fuel elements, control rods, and a moderator.
  • 33. Nuclear Reactors The moderator slows neutrons and the control rods absorb neutrons.
  • 34. 32.4.1. Which one of the following statements concerning a nuclear reactor is true? a) Nuclear energy is converted to thermal energy within the reactor. b) Binding energy is converted to nuclear energy within the reactor. c) Binding energy is created within the reactor. d) Thermal energy is converted to nuclear energy within the reactor. e) Energy is created in the fission reactions that occur within the reactor.
  • 35. 32.4.2. What is the purpose of the moderator in a fission reactor? a) The moderator prevents heat loss from the reactor core. b) The moderator decreases the speed of fast neutrons. c) The moderator absorbs slow neutrons. d) The moderator absorbs gamma rays. e) The moderator prevents the reactor from reaching a critical state.
  • 36. 32.4.3. A nuclear power plant is constructed to generate 6.0 × 10 8 W. If the nuclear fission reaction used in the reactor produces 150 MeV per fission, how many fissions per second are required? a) 6.0 × 10 23 b) 2.5 × 10 19 c) 6.4 × 10 18 d) 1.1 × 10 18 e) 4.0 × 10 17
  • 37. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 5: Nuclear Fusion
  • 38. Nuclear Fusion Two nuclei of very low mass can combine to generate energy. This process is called nuclear fusion.
  • 39. Fusion
  • 40. 32.5.1. In a fusion reaction in which two helium nuclei are fused, what nucleus is produced? a) b) c) d) e)
  • 41. 32.5.2. Consider the following nuclear reaction: + X . Identify particle X . a) a photon b) a proton c) a neutron d) an electron e) No such particle is produced in this reaction.
  • 42. 32.5.3. Under what circumstances can a fusion reaction be self-sustaining? a) Unlike fission, there are no circumstances in which fusion can be self-sustaining. b) A fusion reaction can be self-sustaining if the reaction produces heavier nuclei from lighter nuclei. c) A fusion reaction can be self-sustaining if the reaction produces lighter nuclei from heavier nuclei. d) A fusion reaction can be self-sustaining if the reaction produces nuclei with larger binding energy per nucleon. e) A fusion reaction can be self-sustaining if the reaction produces nuclei with smaller binding energy per nucleon
  • 43. 32.5.4. A certain fission reaction releases three neutrons. How many of these neutrons must go on to produce a subsequent fission if a chain reaction is to be sustained? a) 1 b) 2 c) 3 d) It could be zero as long as there are other neutrons from other fission processes available.
  • 44. 32.5.5. Is there some minimum requirement of mass of fissile material, such as uranium, for a chain reaction to be sustained? a) No, a small number of atoms is sufficient. b) Yes, there must be enough material to prevent neutrons from escaping and defeating the chain reaction. c) Yes, there must be enough fissions to continue the chain reaction. d) Yes, there must be enough energy to continue the chain reaction.
  • 45. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 6: Elementary Particles
  • 46. Fundamental Particles
    • This will be discussed in greater detail in Ch 32
    • 3 Types of Fundamental Particles
      • Bosons (Messenger Particles)
        • Photon, W + , W - , Z, Gluons
        • Gravitons (?)
      • Leptons
        • electron, tau, muon, and corresponding neutrinos
      • Quarks
        • up, down, charm, strange, top, bottom
      • All particles have corresponding antiparticles
        • For particles with no charge, the particles is its own antiparticle
  • 47. Elementary Particles - Hadrons Mesons consist of a quark-antiquark pair, while baryons consist of three quarks.
  • 48. Elementary Particles - Hadrons
    • Mesons
    • Quark pairs
      • Pion (  )
      • Kaon (K)
      • Eta (  )
    • Baryons
    • 3 quark combinations
      • Proton (p)
      • Neutron (n)
      • Lambda (  )
      • Sigma (  )
      • Omega (  )
  • 49. Particle Formation Pion production through p-p collision.
  • 50. Uses of Particles Antiparticles, like positrons, can be used in positron emission tomography, or PET scans.
  • 51. PET Scan Image
  • 52. Units of Matter The current view of how matter is composed of basic units.
  • 53. 32.6.1. In what way are photons related to charged particles, such as electrons and protons? a) Photons, also having a charge, are members of the same family as other charged particles. b) Charged particles, such as electrons and protons, interact with each other via photons. c) Charged particles, such as electrons and protons, are composed of photons. d) Photons interact with each other via charged particles, such as electrons and protons. e) There is no relationship between these particles; and that is why photons have a family all to themselves.
  • 54. 32.6.2. Which one of the following kinds of particles is most closely related to an electron? a) muon b) quark c) proton d) kaon e) neutrino
  • 55. 32.6.3. Which one of the following statements concerning the antiparticle of the proton is true? a) The antiproton has a positive charge and a negative mass. b) The antiproton has no charge and a positive mass. c) The antiproton has a negative charge and a negative mass. d) The antiproton has no charge and a negative mass. e) The antiproton has a negative charge and a positive mass.
  • 56. 32.6.4. Within the theoretical framework called the Standard Model, which one of the following is not considered an elementary particle? a) quark b) electron c) proton d) antiquark e) neutrino
  • 57. 32.6.5. Which one of the following particles is not composed of quarks? a) proton b) neutron c) kaon d) pion e) muon
  • 58. Chapter 32: Ionizing Radiation, Nuclear Energy, & Elementary Particles Section 7: Cosmology
  • 59. Cosmology Hubble’s law distance of galaxy from earth speed of galaxy
  • 60. Forces throughout BANG
  • 61. 32.7.1. The cosmic background radiation of the universe was produced at what point in the history of the universe? a) a few billion years ago when the universe had cooled to about 3 K b) about 12 billion years ago when the first atoms formed c) after the first one hundred thousand years when protons, electrons, and neutrons were formed d) after the first 10  35 s e) at the Big Bang
  • 62. 32.7.2. Which one of the following forces is the most difficult to unify with the other three fundamental forces? a) weak nuclear force b) strong nuclear force c) electromagnetic force d) gravitational force e) normal force
  • 63. 32.7.3. Why is the gravitational force so difficult to reconcile with the other three fundamental forces into a single grand unified force? a) It has infinite reach. b) It is much weaker than the other forces. c) It involves mass. d) The universal gravitational constant cannot be accurately measured. e) Gravitons have only been produced in small numbers in laboratories.
  • 64. END

×