IMPACT   SCALE          SUSTAINABILITY         CITIZEN SCHOOLS BUSINESS PLAN   2011 -2014
CITIZEN SCHOOLS AT A GLANCE 2011-20127 states |      16 school districts    |   31 school partners   |   4,600 students   ...
LETTER FROM THE CO-FOUNDERA teacher of mine at the Harvard GraduateSchool of Education, Kay Merseth, used to tellme and my...
LETTER FROM THE CO-FOUNDERMore time to practice and learn                                More caring and talented adults i...
More real-world, relevant learning                          At Citizen Schools, we work every day to provideopportunities ...
6
VISIONClose the opportunity and achievement gapby expanding the learning day andengaging students in real-world learning,e...
THE CASE FOR CITIZEN SCHOOLS                          Education is the key to individual opportunity and prosperity.      ...
THE CONTEXT FOR REFORMPolicy changes such as Race to the Top have dramaticallyincreased the pace of change in education an...
THEORY OF STUDENT IMPACTThe Shooting StarCitizen Schools drives student impact by shifting students’educational trajectory...
THEORY OF SYSTEMIC IMPACTThe MegaphoneThrough data and stories of success,we mobilize a movement.                   Inspir...
CITIZEN SCHOOLS PROGRAM MODEL The Bull’s Eye                                                    Since 1995, Citizen School...
THE EXPANDED LEARNING DAY                    MONDAY                   TUESDAY              WEDNESDAY                 THURS...
VALUE PROPOSITION FOR SCHOOLS                          15-20 highly talented staff join your school faculty        “SECON...
A TRACK RECORD OF IMPACTIndependent evaluations show that               ENGAGEMENT                         Citizen Schools...
THE EDWARDS TURNAROUND                    In 2006, Citizen Schools began exploring Expanded Learning                    Ti...
FROM OUT-OF-SCHOOL TO EXPANDED-LEARNINGThese results suggest that our hands-on program model,developed in out-of-school ti...
STRATEGIC PRIORITIES, 2011-2014         Increase our                                Increase                      Increase...
BALANCED SCORECARD METRICS    OBJECTIVES                   MEASURES                                     Average network-w...
IMPACT METRICS  Program Scorecard, 2011-2012  OBJECTIVES                  MEASURES                                        ...
TACTICS FOR INCREASING IMPACT CREATE EXCELLENT             CREATE SCALABLE              CREATE STRONG                 VALI...
TACTICS FOR INCREASING SCALE AND SUSTAINABILITYCREATE RELIABLE TALENT                 CREATE STRONG                       ...
TACTICS FOR BUILDING AN ELT MOVEMENTCREATE A SUPPORTIVE                       INCREASE VISIBLITY FOR              CREATE A...
www.citizenschools.org24
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Impact - Scale - Sustainability

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Citizen Schools Business Plan, 2011-2014
The case for expanded learning time, evidence of Citizen Schools' impact on closing the achievement gap, and the organization's goals and metrics for the next few years.

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Transcript of "Impact - Scale - Sustainability"

  1. 1. IMPACT SCALE SUSTAINABILITY CITIZEN SCHOOLS BUSINESS PLAN 2011 -2014
  2. 2. CITIZEN SCHOOLS AT A GLANCE 2011-20127 states | 16 school districts | 31 school partners | 4,600 students | 4,200 Citizen Teachers NEW YORK Bronx Brooklyn Harlem MASSACHUSETTS Boston New Bedford Revere NEW JERSEY Newark NORTH CAROLINA Charlotte Durham Henderson CALIFORNIA Campbell Dallas East Palo Alto NEW MEXICO Oakland Albuquerque Redwood City Mescalero Santa Fe TEXAS Houston 2
  3. 3. LETTER FROM THE CO-FOUNDERA teacher of mine at the Harvard GraduateSchool of Education, Kay Merseth, used to tellme and my fellow students to be clear on our“keel”: our core beliefs about education.The keel, her nautical metaphor suggested, would providebalance and stability as we pursued greater student learningamidst the shifting tides of education policy and public opinion.Today, Kay’s advice feels more important than ever, aseducation policy and practice change faster than ever before—and as frustration levels rise among educators due to persistentachievement gaps (we don’t feel successful) and decliningresources (we expect things will get harder before they getbetter).Sixteen years after founding Citizen Schools, I am clearer thanever about my keel. I believe that children, particularly low-income children, need three things to succeed in school and life.Children need more time to learn, more talent and caring adultsin the classroom, and more relevance in their learningexperiences. 3
  4. 4. LETTER FROM THE CO-FOUNDERMore time to practice and learn More caring and talented adults in theiracademic and life skills. lives—including but not limited to full- time teachers.As Malcolm Gladwell suggests in his best-selling bookOutliers, and Matthew Syed brilliantly chronicles in Human beings learn through relationships andBounce: How Champions Are Made, becoming excellent at experience. We always have and we always will. Inanything—from sports to violin to college-level strong communities (at all income levels), children get aacademics—is a matter of practice, not inherited talent. chance to learn with many talented adults—teachers,Gladwell says 10,000 hours of practice are required to coaches, mentors, tutors, neighbors, and more.excel. In an upper-income community, children are moreUpper-income children likely have greater access to likely to meet (and may be related to) successfulout-of-school learning through tutoring, supervised professionals, including doctors, lawyers, engineers,homework sessions, sports teams, art and music and scientists. This opens up options. When theselessons, travel, museum and college visits, and dinner- diverse adults are inaccessible to students in theirtable discussion and debate. We will have a chance to schools and extended-day experiences, as they are inclose the achievement gap only when we give low- many low-income neighborhoods, there is anincome children equal or greater learning time and opportunity gap—which we must work to close.opportunities as upper-income children. 4
  5. 5. More real-world, relevant learning At Citizen Schools, we work every day to provideopportunities that connect school to children with these key ingredients of more time, morecareers and teach problem-solving and caring adults, and more relevant learning.creativity. Together with visionary school and district leaders—These are the skills individuals increasingly need to and with committed community and corporatesucceed in the workforce of the future. Most schools partners—we are inventing a new model and structureserving upper-income children cover the academic for schooling: one that supports teachers and schoolsbasics and engage students in authentic projects, which instead of blaming them. Together we can not onlyboth require the application of basic skills and engender reduce opportunity and achievement gaps, butexcitement about learning. Too often, schools serving eliminate them.low-income students focus on the basics but don’tconnect academics to the real world. As a result, toomany students are bored by school and don’t see theconnection between academic classes and the cool jobsthey could apply for in the future. Eric Schwarz July 2011Even if we equalize proficiency in reading and math(and we’ve got a long way to go), we will not eliminatethe achievement gap in college and career readinessuntil we provide all students with an equal chance tobuild their creativity and problem-solving skillsthrough motivating, real-world projects. 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. VISIONClose the opportunity and achievement gapby expanding the learning day andengaging students in real-world learning,ensuring that all children graduate high schoolready to succeed in college and careers.By 2020, we envision that most U.S. schools serving low-incomechildren have re-imagined the length and structure of the schoolday. Thousands of schools have moved from the six-hour dayled by a teacher talking to kids to a nine- or ten-hour day thatincorporates master teachers leading core instruction and asecond shift of skilled educators who bring learning to lifethrough hands-on, real world projects and academic practice.The opportunity and achievement gaps with wealthier studentshave closed. The high school drop-out rate is cut in half. Collegegraduation rates have doubled. The U.S. is first in the world ineducation again, and the U.S. economy roars back to life,fortified by a new generation of inventors and collaborators.And our democracy is stronger. 7
  8. 8. THE CASE FOR CITIZEN SCHOOLS Education is the key to individual opportunity and prosperity. College graduates now earn twice as much as those with high school diplomas, and the gap continues to grow. Middle school reform is a particularly urgent national challenge. Hard-won gains from the elementary years are often undermined during these years. Sixth grade performance is a predictor of long-term success, including high school graduation. Exposure to professional scientists and engineers is an important factor in fostering interest in these careers. A common feature of the few hundred schools that are delivering great results for poor kids is dramatically more learning time to provide relevant and targeted academic support and coaching. Offering an effective and sustainable longer learning day requires a second shift of skilled educators and volunteer citizen teachers, whose lessons are aligned with the traditional- day teachers but offer new techniques to motivate and engage students. By mobilizing citizens to get directly involved in education, Citizen Schools increases chances for broader school reform while adding relevance to academic work. 8
  9. 9. THE CONTEXT FOR REFORMPolicy changes such as Race to the Top have dramaticallyincreased the pace of change in education and openness to out-of-the-box solutions to improve results for all children. States arecreating systems to link teacher performance to studentachievement. Several nationwide initiatives are encouraginginnovation in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM)education. Some new union contracts offer more flexibility inworking conditions and compensation. The increase in chartersis putting competitive pressure to improve on districts.At the same time, districts face significant budget challenges.School closings, layoffs and increases in class size areincreasingly common. As a result, districts are increasingly opento scalable, sustainable, and cost-effective partnerships andoutsourcing to improve results.Citizen Schools offers districts a proven, cost-effective solutionto increase student and parent engagement and improveacademic results. 9
  10. 10. THEORY OF STUDENT IMPACTThe Shooting StarCitizen Schools drives student impact by shifting students’educational trajectory in middle school toward a path to college SUCCESSand career success. in college & career LONG-TERM OUTCOMES  Achievement  Graduation  College and career readiness MID-TERM OUTCOMES  Engagement  Achievement  Selection of a college-track SHORT-TERM OUTCOMES high school  ACCESS to positive peers, adults and experiences CITIZEN SCHOOLS  SKILLS, academic and PROGRAM 21st century  BELIEF in the connection  Apprenticeships between hard work, education  Academic coaching and future success  College to career connections 10
  11. 11. THEORY OF SYSTEMIC IMPACTThe MegaphoneThrough data and stories of success,we mobilize a movement. Inspire Prove it Transform kids. works. education. INSPIRE KIDS PROVE IT WORKS TRANSFORM EDUCATION  Engage high-need middle school  Use rigorous evaluations to show  Change laws or regulations at students through highly effective that ELT increases engagement in local, state, and national level to ELT school partnerships school and proficiency on state tests make it easier to use current  Mobilize a second shift of  Persuade district decision-makers public investment on ELT educators to make learning that ELT is a cost-effective way to  Create a demand for change relevant, and train and support improve results and attract families through media, influence, and them advocacy 11
  12. 12. CITIZEN SCHOOLS PROGRAM MODEL The Bull’s Eye Since 1995, Citizen Schools has provided middle school students with the opportunity to learn through hands-on projects and to Skills, access, and belief drive student success in cognitive, receive targeted academic support and coaching during the behavioral, and affective learning. afternoon hours. This part of the school day is taught by a “second shift” of educators, consisting of Citizen Schools’ program staff and “Citizen Teachers,” volunteers with expertise in different fields, including STEM. Citizen Schools begins in the afternoon, and seamlessly integrates its culture of achievement into the school. Our curricula are designed to build students’ skills, provide access to community resources, and instill belief in the connection between hard work and success. Program elements foster three competencies vital to students’ future success: 21st century skills, academic skills, and college readiness skills. 12
  13. 13. THE EXPANDED LEARNING DAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY Homeroom Homeroom Homeroom Homeroom Homeroom Literacy & ELA Literacy & ELA Literacy & ELA Literacy & ELA Literacy & ELA Math Math Math Math Math Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Lunch Social Studies Social Studies Social Studies Social Studies Social Studies Science Science Science Science ScienceTransition around SNACK AND CIRCLE SNACK SNACK SNACK 3pm ACADEMIC SUPPORT ACADEMIC SUPPORT JOINT ACADEMIC SUPPORT ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL APPRENTICESHIPS/ DEVELOPMENTDismissal around COLLEGE TO CAREER 8TH GRADE APPRENTICESHIPS ACADEMY EXPLORE! 6pm CONNECTIONS SATURDAY ACADEMIC SUPPORT COLLEGE TO CAREER APPRENTICESHIPS 8TH GRADE ACADEMY/ CONNECTIONS COLLEGE TO CAREER  Homework time  Aligned to 21st Century Skills and  Support for high school CONNECTIONS common-core standards  Time management and applications in districts self-organization with high-school choice  Semester-long projects that culminate in student presentations  Standards-aligned,  Visits to colleges and hands-on practice in introductions to careers  Co-taught by Citizen Schools staff math or literacy and volunteer Citizen Teachers  Analyzing grades to set who are experts in their fields, with goals special focus on STEM professionals 13
  14. 14. VALUE PROPOSITION FOR SCHOOLS  15-20 highly talented staff join your school faculty “SECOND SHIFT”  Low teacher to student ratios (1:15) for academic and social support STAFFING  Opportunity to spread workload across more faculty and allow for more planning time  Targeted support of high leverage academic skills ACADEMIC  Standards-aligned curricula in Math or English Language Arts PRACTICE  Citizen Schools staff join grade level meetings and Instructional Leadership teams  Hands on activities that make learning relevant  Diverse 10-week apprenticeships taught by community and corporate REAL WORLD volunteers LEARNING  Curriculum focus on 21st Century Skills, including oral presentation, leadership, data analysis, advanced literacy and technology  Biweekly phone calls home, based on conversations with school faculty  Regular events to help families connect to schools, including potlucks FAMILY and high school information sessions and selection coaching ENGAGEMENT  Help families connect to schools by hiring staff who communicate in home languages  Students participate in 100+ hours of programming that helps prepare COLLEGE TO them for high school and college CAREER EXPOSURE  Visits to colleges, corporations and other cultural institutions 14
  15. 15. A TRACK RECORD OF IMPACTIndependent evaluations show that ENGAGEMENT Citizen Schoolsstudents who participated in Citizen Schools Attendance is one of the best attendance is higherare more engaged and successful in school predictors of whether a than matched peers,than their peers—even years after the student will drop out of reducing absenteeismprogram. school. As early as middle by 43%. school, high absenteeism is a powerful indicator of dropout risk. ACHIEVEMENT 9 out of 10 Citizen Many students lack the Schools alumni passed academic skills necessary for state exit exams in college and career success. Only math and English, one-quarter of high school closing the graduates who took the ACT in achievement gap with 2010 met college readiness state averages. benchmarks. GRADUATION Citizen Schools Nationwide, 2.2 million students participants attend high schools that qualify had a 20% higher high as “dropout factories.” Each school graduation rate year, more than a million young than matched peers people fail to graduate with (71% vs. 59%). their class. 15
  16. 16. THE EDWARDS TURNAROUND In 2006, Citizen Schools began exploring Expanded Learning Time (ELT) partnerships in Boston, serving the entire sixth grade as part of a mandatory longer school day. Four low-achieving schools in Massachusetts that piloted ELT partnerships with Citizen Schools saw average annual gains in proficiency that are double to triple the gains for other ELT schools, and state averages. At the Edwards Middle School, for instance, 6th grade proficiency rates increased from 15% to 37% in math and from 27% to 49% in English Language Arts (ELA). The 8th graders who had participated in ELT for all three years of middle school outscored the state average in math in 2009, reversing the achievement gap. 16
  17. 17. FROM OUT-OF-SCHOOL TO EXPANDED-LEARNINGThese results suggest that our hands-on program model,developed in out-of-school time (OST), can drive significant,school-wide results when more students experience it in asetting fully integrated into the full school day.Today, Citizen Schools is shifting from an optional after-schoolprogram to a whole-grade, whole-school, ELT model to helptraditional public schools serving the poorest communitiesdramatically improve performance. We plan to shift themajority of our school partnerships from OST to ELT by 2014, andfocus our strategy on proving that ELT is effective andsustainable at scale. 17
  18. 18. STRATEGIC PRIORITIES, 2011-2014 Increase our Increase Increase organizational IMPACT SCALE SUSTAINABILITYon students and schools by ten times to serve more and create the conditions using proven metrics students and schools for an ELT movementWe will validate ELT as a school We will grow the ELT model to serve In order to define and create theimprovement and turnaround model, more students and schools and prove conditions to scale ELT more broadlydemonstrating significant gains in effectiveness at 25 schools across urban beyond 2014, we will growproficiency (15 percentage points or and rural school districts. renewable/replaceable public andgreater) and school engagement (30% private funding streams to bereduction in absenteeism and sustainable at $31+ million withoutsuspensions and improvement in special infusions of “growth capital.”belief/locus of control measures). 18
  19. 19. BALANCED SCORECARD METRICS OBJECTIVES MEASURES  Average network-wide score on Program Scorecard Increase  Percent of apprentices maintaining an A or B or improving a C, D, or F in English Language Arts1 STUDENT SUCCESS  Percent of apprentices maintaining an A or B or improving a C, D, or F in Math  Increased proficiency rate on Math & ELA state assessments Engage  Average campus retention rate2 MORE APPRENTICES  Average annual enrollment for more time  Percent of apprenticeships rated high-quality Improve  Percent of Citizen Teachers who feel they made a significant impact on student learning3 APPRENTICESHIP IMPACT  Percent of apprenticeships led by partners  Percent of apprenticeships with science, technology, engineering, or math (STEM) focus  Number of ELT campuses secured GROW4  Number of Super STEMcampuses the national network  Public funds appropriated for Citizen Schools and programs like it since 2009  Total revenue Ensure  Fully loaded cost per child5 FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY  Total operating reserve at scale  Total revenue raised for the next fiscal year Deliver effective6 SITE SUPPORT  Percent of Campus Directors satisfied with support and services from the national organization and services  Pilot: Number of high-leverage actions taken on behalf of Citizen Schools by Citizen Teachers7 Build our BRAND  Number of high-leverage online actions taken on behalf of Citizen Schools  Number of e-mail addresses on our house list  Number of campus staff (Program Directors, Campus Directors, Teaching Fellows, and Teaching Associates) Effectively recruit, hired in time to attend relevant orientations8 retain and develop  Percent of state, national and Campus Director roles where at least 33% of finalists are of color STAFF  Scores of incoming campus staff on the characteristics most correlated with high performance  Percent of staff satisfied with their supervision Build and maintain a9 CULTURE reflecting  Percent of staff satisfied with organizational culture and values our core values 19
  20. 20. IMPACT METRICS Program Scorecard, 2011-2012 OBJECTIVES MEASURES TARGETS  Achieve student enrollment target  95% Build ENGAGEMENT &  Promote student attendance  91% (ELT: 92%; OST: 90%) INVESTMENT  Promote student retention  75% (ELT: 90%; OST: 70%) in Citizen Schools  Ensure constituent satisfaction  4.0  Maintain an A/B grade in English Language Arts (ELA) course  85% Literacy  Improve a C/D/ F grade in ELA course  50%  Increase proficiency rate on ELA state assessment*  +5 percentage points Build students’ ACADEMIC SKILLS  Maintain an A/B grade in Math course  85% Math  Improve a C/D/ F grade in Math course  50%  Increase proficiency rate on Math state assessment*  +5 percentage points Build students’  Improve oral communication skills  77% 21ST CENTURY SKILLS  Improve leadership skills  77%  Promote students’ culture of support  50% Build students’  Promote students’ access to high school, college & career connections  50% ACCESS & BELIEFS  Promote students’ belief in the education-to-success connection  94%  Promote students’ self-efficacy  78% Build students’  Set 8th graders on a college pathway**  N/A** COLLEGE PATHWAYS * Assessment results will be reported in fall 2012 when results are available. If possible, preliminary results will be reported in July on the end-of-year PSC. ** Each region is in the process of developing a college pathway measure that is a meaningful and appropriate measure given its local context. Results will be reported in fall 2012. 20
  21. 21. TACTICS FOR INCREASING IMPACT CREATE EXCELLENT CREATE SCALABLE CREATE STRONG VALIDATE ELT TRAINING AND TOOLS FOR SCHOOL RESULTS THROUGH COACHING INSTRUCTION AND PARTNERSHIPS EVALUATION SYSTEMS FOR MANAGEMENT FOR SECOND SHIFT SECOND SHIFT1. Strengthen national and 1. Develop a knowledge 1. Refine school 1. Engage Abt Associates regional summer capture and sharing selection/cultivation to evaluate our ELT trainings system for program best criteria that reflect model through a school practices critical factors including level quasi-experimental2. Strengthen Citizen school leadership/ study consistent with Teacher support: 2. Invest in an effective, academic team What Works curriculum, lesson easy-to-use curriculum leadership, high-need Clearinghouse planning, enhanced development/lesson student population standards guidance from program planning system staff, and education 2. Integrate the first and 3. Document and share reform context second shift, creating a models of excellence shared vision of student3. Provide direct field across program expectations, shared support to Managing elements aligned with instructional practices Directors of Program rubrics and tools and shared student level around ELT planning and 4. Develop “Our Shared assessments implementation, core Culture” Plan including program model trainings/ standards/ execution, and tools/resources for instructional leadership classroom management, goal- setting, character/ student success 21
  22. 22. TACTICS FOR INCREASING SCALE AND SUSTAINABILITYCREATE RELIABLE TALENT CREATE STRONG INCREASE PRIVATE INCREASE SHARE OFPIPELINES FOR SECOND DISTRICT PARTNERSHIPS FUNDING BY DIRECT CAMPUSSHIFT FOCUSING ON 6-7 COSTS COVERED BY FIGURE GIFTS PUBLIC FUNDSPROGRAM STAFF EDUCATORS: 1. Refine district 1. Build strong national and 1. Generate research and selection/cultivation criteria regional boards capable of case studies that1. Invest in college partnerships that reflect critical factors, generating large gifts demonstrate how school2. Tighten the implementation of including district level support directly and through their leaders are freeing up our candidate selection for ELT as a lever for reform and networks public funds to pay for ELT model/criteria funding 2. Increase support from 2. Optimize current public3. Use data comparing candidate 2. Convene ELT practitioners and foundations who are funding sources, including hiring rubric scores and on- other partners to create a aligning with districts and Title I, SES, CLC, SIG, RTTT and campus performance to drive community of practice, inspire interested in school state/local formula dollars continuous improvements in excellence, and establish a transformation strategies 3. Create stronger sourcing and selection network of ELT experts and 3. Drive large gifts through our relationships with ambassadors4. Source Campus Directors via corporate sponsorship district/school leaders, Teaching Fellowship and TFA efforts with national players through an ELT Summit in alumni partnership who have a presence in Boston and tailoredVOLUNTEER CITIZEN TEACHERS: multiple Citizen Schools cultivation led by state states Executive Directors1. Invest in corporate partnerships to deliver excellent partner-led 4. Raise expectations for apprenticeships financial commitment from prospective ELT partners:2. Invest in social media to most new partners/ELT sites develop and mobilize for FY12 are committing community of Citizen Teachers $1,000-$1,200 per student to drive retention and recruitment 22
  23. 23. TACTICS FOR BUILDING AN ELT MOVEMENTCREATE A SUPPORTIVE INCREASE VISIBLITY FOR CREATE AN ELTCLIMATE FOR ELT ELT AS A LEADING TOOLBOX FOR USE BYTHROUGH PUBLIC SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT CITIZEN SCHOOLS ANDPOLICY STRATEGY THE FIELD1. Continue direct federal 1. Pursue third-party validation 1. Create a shared library of advocacy, primarily pursuing for ELT including books, reports, curriculum, training guides, policy changes to 21st CCLC media coverage including op- and other materials pertaining and maintaining funding for eds, endorsement by to high-quality ELT for use by 21st CCLC and AmeriCorps, influential bloggers, Citizen Schools staff, partners, and ESEA reauthorization academics, and pundits and the field more broadly2. Seek greater emphasis on ELT 2. Find compelling stories to and better definition within prove ELT and generate new School Improvement Grant leads, video, reports, case program studies, and share through old and new media3. Pursue early-stage state policy advocacy, including 3. Align external mass engagement with state communication policies and departments of education systems (constituent database, and how we reach out to constituents) 4. Ensure high-functioning internal communications 23
  24. 24. www.citizenschools.org24
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