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Gilbane 2013 Boston - Are You Prepared to Create Content for the Internet of Things?
 

Gilbane 2013 Boston - Are You Prepared to Create Content for the Internet of Things?

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What are the principles that should guide your decisions when creating content for the internet of things? What types of content, where to place it, and how it should interact with the end-users?

What are the principles that should guide your decisions when creating content for the internet of things? What types of content, where to place it, and how it should interact with the end-users?

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    Gilbane 2013 Boston - Are You Prepared to Create Content for the Internet of Things? Gilbane 2013 Boston - Are You Prepared to Create Content for the Internet of Things? Presentation Transcript

    • Are You Prepared to Create Content for the Internet of Things? DO HE T NT ME CU Chris Carter @Gilbane @CyWhisp #gilbane
    • 24-50 BILLION We  are  already  saturated,  overloaded,  with  content.  We  keep  hearing  that  the  Internet  of  Things  is  right  around  the  corner.  We  are   already  saturated,  overloaded,  with  content.  We  keep  hearing  that  the  Internet  of  Things  is  right  around  the  corner.       And  depending  on  whose  research  you  listen  to,  by  2020  there  will  be  anywhere  from  24  to  50  billion  connected  devices  in  the  world.   Granted,  most  of  these  devices  will  just  be  sensing  and  collecDng  data  and  talking  to  other  devices.    But  even  if  only  a  small  percentage  of   those  newly-­‐connected  devices  has  a  user  interface,  that  is  sDll  a  few  billion  new  places  to  deliver  content.  
    • 24-50 BILLION BIG CONTENT Forget  Big  Data,  we’re  entering  Big  Content.       But  the  Internet  of  Things  isn’t  like  the  content  delivery  systems  you  already  know.  It  isn’t  about  content.  It’s  not  about  interface.  It’s   about  hidden  computaDon  and  value-­‐added  funcDonality.    
    • So  where  will  we  see  all  of  this  content  in  the  near  future?  What  will  have  a  user  interface?      The  same  devices  that  always  did.  None  of  them  are  going  away.  Computers,  laptops,  tablets,  smartphones.    
    • Devices  we  know  already,  but  are  showing  disrupDve  changes  in  their  interface  or  content.  The  biggest  market  of  this  kind  is  televisions.   Using  a  TV  to  watch  broadcast  programming  is  so  last  decade.  And  when  I  say  broadcast  television,  I  mean  cable,  satellite,  antenna.   Over  half  of  smart  TV  owners  use  their  TVs  to  watch  streaming  internet  shows  or  to  surf  the  web  as  much  as  they  watch  broadcast   television  shows.  We’ve  passed  the  Dpping  point.  Television  sets  are  no  longer  primarily  for  television.    
    • Devices  that  never  had  connecDvity  or  such  interface  before.  A  watch  used  to  be  a  watch.  Appliances  are  now  being  connected,  and   many  have  a  user  interface  for  the  first  Dme.  Automobiles  are  shiRing  from  mechanical  devices  that  have  digital  features,  to  digital   devices  that  have  mechanical  features.  A  recent  consumer  focus  group  by  KPMG  found,  when  it  comes  to  building  connected  cars,  car   buyers  trust  tech  companies  more  than  car  manufactures.    
    • And  lastly,  brand  new  devices.  Heads-­‐Up-­‐Devices  are  geWng  a  lot  of  aXenDon  now.  From  Google  Glass  to  its  compeDtors.  These   probably  won’t  truly  be  market  ready  for  up  to  2  years,  but  many  companies  large  and  small  are  already  creaDng  content  or  content   systems  for  these.         And  eventually,  connected  clothing.  E-­‐fabrics  can  already  be  made  out  of  copper  threads  that  can  store  up  to  possibly  a  terabyte  of  data   in  one  garment.  And  one  team  recently  developed  nickel  and  carbon  coated  yarns  that  turn  fabric  into  a  working  baXery.  A  few  labs   around  the  world  are  already  working  on  e-­‐fabrics  that  have  digital  UI  built  into  it.    
    • We  are  interacDng  with  more  devices,  and  there  is  a  shiR  in  the  types  of  user  interface  that  are  becoming  a  regular  part  of  our  lives.    
    • Human Interaction The  way  we  interface  with  devices  is  less  mechanical  control,  and  more  human-­‐like  interacDon.  Machines  have  knobs  and  buXons  and   keyboards  and  mice.  But  now  it’s  more  “Hey  you,  do  that!”         People  are  starDng  to  think  of  their  devices  more  like  people  than  machines.  We  don’t  input,  we  interact.  We  expect  a  reacDon.  We   don’t  talk  at  them,  we  converse  with  them.  We  anthropomorphize  or  devices.  When  we  configure  a  new  device,  we’re  told  “Now  give   this  device  a  name”.         Studies  show  that  we  are  more  willing  to  interact  with  a  device  when  it  has  a  face  or  facial  features.    
    • We  want  to  have  interfaces  or   inputs  that  are  more  natural.   Less  machine-­‐like.         HandwriDng  is  more  natural   than  typing.  Google  added   handwriDng  to  Google   Translate  because  it’s  easier   than  input  methods  for  many   eastern  languages,  like   Chinese.       Recently  Google  expanded   handwriDng  to  emails  in  Gmail.   And  Google  plans  to  keep   extending  this  technology  into   more  of  their  products.  
    • Screens  are  geWng  smaller.  Again,  nothing  is  disappearing,  but  we  now  use  smaller  screens  to  do  much  of  what  large  screens  used  to  be   good  enough  for.  It’s  driven  by  a  shiR  to  mobile  compuDng,  but  the  IoT  requires  very  small  things  to  be  connected  too.  There’s  a  limit.   Phone  screens  are  not  always  easy  to  operate.  But  most  smartwatches  coming  out  now  have  touch  screens.  That’s  just  silly.         We  need  alternaDves  to  screens.    
    • HapDcs,  or  touch  interface,  hasn’t  been  around  for  that  long,  but  many  touch  interfaces  are  already  being  replaced  by  kinesics,  or   gesture.  First  there  was  Kinect,  but  it  the  quality  was  low.  Then  LeapMoDon  came  out  and  it  was  200  Dmes  more  accurate.  Myo   armbands  read  muscles  in  your  wrist  to  determine  what  the  hand  and  fingers  are  doing.  And  WiSee  uses  WiFi  that  you  already  have  in   your  home  as  radar  to  read  the  specific  body  movements  of  anyone  in  the  house,  wherever  they  are.         There  is  sDll  a  lot  of  experimentaDon  with  the  best  ways  to  incorporate  gesture.    
    • Siri? Привет Vocalics,  or  voice  interface,  is  perhaps  going  to  see  the  most  growth  in  the  next  few  years.  Advances  in  natural  language  processing   brought  us  Siri  and  Google  Now,  but  those  are  geWng  mixed  reviews.  Although  Google  Now  just  last  month  updated  from  voice   commands  to  “conversaDonal  mode”  commands,  which  use  more  natural  Turn-­‐Taking  and  Pre-­‐Sequencing  theories.  The  research  is  sDll   going,  and  it  will  get  beXer.  Mostly  because  people  really  want  voice  interface.  We  just  don’t  yet  know  where.    Text-­‐to-­‐voice  and  voice-­‐ to-­‐text  conversion  technologies  have  varying  levels  of  quality.  Especially  in  languages  other  than  English.    
    • For  now,  we  sDll  think  of  most  content  as  a  2-­‐dimensional  medium.  But  some  flat  interfaces  will  gradually  be  replaced  with  Augmented   Reality  and  even  Virtual  Reality.         17%  of  smartphone  owners  already  use  some  form  of  AR  on  their  phone.  And  50%  more  said  they  don’t  but  would  like  to.  AR  is  already   used  in  so  many  places,  from  gaming  to  simulators.  And  VR  is  currently  being  used  in  to  treat  PTSD,  drug  addicDon,  phobias,  for  physical   therapy,  amputees,  and  burn  vicDms.  
    • Immersive  VR  like  the  Oculus  RiR  is   geWng  a  lot  of  media  aXenDon.   AdverDsements  have  been  placed  in   the  online  worlds  of  games  for  years   already.  And  the  inventor  of  Second   Life,  Philip  Rosedale,  is  developing  and   planning  to  launch  a  second  Virtual   Life  environment  for  people  using  VR   interface.  That’s  a  whole  new  universe   that  will  need  content.    
    • And  then  there’s  virtual  reDnal  display.  It  isn’t  exactly  virtual  reality,  it  projects  photons  directly  onto  your  eye  to  make  you  see  things   that  aren’t  actually  there.  The  company  Avegant  currently  has  prototypes  that  are  glasses,  and  those  have  a  virtual  reality  effect.  But   the  same  technology  could  be  used  to  project  from  a  device  that  you  aren’t  wearing.  It  could  make  you  see  holograms  or  images   floaDng  in  air  in  front  of  you.  But  only  you  can  see  them.  Rumors  are  the  Samsung  and  even  Amazon  are  working  on  smartphones  that   do  just  that.    
    • More Control Another  major  shiR  is  in  our  relaDonship  with  our  technology.  People  used  to  use  technology.  Now,  devices  are  not  something  we   occasionally  reach  for.  They  are  integrated  into  our  lifestyles.  Our  day  and  our  technology  are  inseparable.  So  users  want  more  control.   We’re  not  talking  about  their  technology,  we’re  talking  about  their  life.         Okay,  this  picture  is  fake.  But  I  do  have  two  friends  in  San  Francisco,  and  aRer  the  preacher  announced  them  married,  they   ceremoniously,  up  at  the  altar,  changed  their  Facebook  status  to  “Married”.    
    • It  is  already  very  common  to  allow  users  to  customize  many  parts  of  device  displays.  And  users  want  even  more  ability  to  control  the   interface.       We  all  have  to  make  so  many  decisions  about  all  of  the  many  configuraDons  and  permissions  for  all  of  our  devices  and  all  of  our  apps  and   programs.  But  we  do  it,  because  we  want  everything  ‘our’  way.  Design  also  has  become  so  customizable.  NoDce,  I  am  not  saying   responsive.  This  isn’t  about  responsive  design  or  even  adapDve  design.  We  are  now  entering  the  age  of  User  Design.  The  exact  same   device  can  manage  the  exact  same  content  differently  for  each  user.         Users  want  to  manually  choose  the  way  their  devices  look.  They  want  to  choose  how  pages  look.  To  choose  which  content  they  receive,   and  what  size,  color,  font,  contrast,  language,  and  even  reading  level  that  content  appears  to  them.  And,  they  want  to  be  able  to  change   their  minds,  at  any  Dme.  
    • But  more  important  than  interface,  users  want  control  over   the  content.  They  already  forward  and  post  and  share  your   content.  SomeDmes  they  manipulate  that  picture  before  they   share  it.  They  already  think  they  control  your  content.         Users  want  any  content  from  anywhere.  The  featurizaDon  of   machine  translaDon  online  became  fairly  standard  only  two   years  ago.  But  it  is  already  moving  towards  no-­‐click   automaDon.  In  many  places,  users  have  the  power  to  choose   which  content  to  receive  at  all.  Apps  and  plug-­‐ins  like  Rather   let  users  delete,  or  replace  content  that  they  don’t  want  to   see.  Facebook  directly  asks  people  in  their  news  feed  if  they   want  to  “Hide  this  content,  or  content  like  it”.         Control.  Users  are  overwhelmed  with  Big  Content,  and  they   just  want  to  reduce  the  flood.  
    • 13% According  to  a  2013  study  by  Janrain,  13%  of  respondents  said  that  they  would  give  up  sex  for  a  month,  if  they  could  get  personalized   content  on  the  web  sites  they  visit  most  oRen.  They  really  want  it!  The  content,  that  is.  And  in  a  separate  survey,  by  the  Custom  Content   Council,  61%  of  respondents  are  “much  more  likely  to  buy”  from  a  company  whose  online  content  is  customizable.       The  promise  of  Big  Data  and  the  Internet  of  Things  is  the  ability  to  beXer  personalize  content  for  individuals.    
    • So  you  keep  sending  them  all  this  content.  But  consumers  are  Dred  of  just  listening.  Social  media  took  us  from  distribuDon  to   conversaDon.  And  now  consumers  want  control  over  the  conversaDon.  Let  them  talk  back.  Don’t  start  a  conversaDon,  create  a   conversaDon  place.  Empower  them  to  talk  to  you,  or  to  each  other.  Let  them  upload  content  of  their  own.  Text,  tweets,  status  updates,   voice,  short  videos,  whatever.         But  how  would  users  talk  back  to  these  products?    Or  why  would  they?  According  to  Edison  Research,  the  number  one  reason  consumers   follow  brands  on  social  media  is  “sales/discounts/coupons”.    Well  that  makes  sense.  But  the  number  two  reason  was  to  discuss  the  brand   with  other  consumers.  And  to  moDvate  the  consumer  to  interact  with  your  product,  you  can  use  extrinsic  rewards,  gamificaDon,   behavioral  confirmaDon,  or  just  pure  entertainment.       And  when  they  talk,  keep  the  conversaDon  going.  People  use  social  media  because  hominids  have  depended  on  social  structure  for  50   million  years.  Modern  humans  need  confirmaDon,  validaDon,  social  status.  Psychologist  Roy  Baumeister  wrote  that  social  sharing  is  a   masochism  used  as  escape  from  self.  In  other  words,  the  self-­‐awareness  of  individualism  creates  a  pressure  from  knowing  you  are  being   judged,  or  –  even  worse  -­‐  ignored.  That’s  why  it’s  so  important  in  social  media  to  reply  when  consumers  reach  out.  Find  ways  to  validate   their  conversaDon.    
    • Despite  all  of  the  hype,  there  are  some  obstacles  prevenDng  the  internet  of  things  from  taking  over  our  reality  tomorrow.  And  it’s  going  to   get  a  liXle  messy.         Change  is  slow.  The  first  connected  refrigerator  was  from  V-­‐Synch  Technology  and  it  hit  the  market  in  1998.    15  years  ago.  Why  doesn’t   everyone  have  one  by  now?       Technical  issues  also  need  to  be  solved,  such  as  baXery  power,  recharging  methods,  and  interoperability  standards.         Security  and  privacy  concerns.  A  third  of  global  consumers  think  data  mining  is  helpful,  but  another  third  think  it  is  too  invasive.       And  fear.  It  takes  Dme  for  the  public  to  become  comfortable  with  new  technology.  When  Guglielmo  Marconi  arrived  in  England  in  1896  to   show  off  his  new  invenDon,  the  radio,  officials  smashed  it  to  bits  afraid  it  would  lead  to  chaos  and  revoluDon.    
    • Basically,  when  designing  content  for  the  Internet  of  Things,  you  are  designing  content  for  a  much  larger  variety  of  devices,  with  a  larger   variety  of  user  experiences,  and  using  a  larger  variety  of  methods  of  interface.  Content  development  overall  is  diversifying.    For  each   content  creator,  or  content  distributor,  relevance  becomes  more  important.  And  not  just  relevance  of  the  content  to  the  target   audience.  Relevance  per  individual,  not  group.  ExperienDal  relevance.  Relevance  to  the  five  senses.    What  will  be  the  guiding  light  when   navigaDng  the  much  more  diversified  content  development  future?  Giving  the  end-­‐user  as  much  control  as  possible  over  their  content   experience.  And  making  that  experience  feel  as  natural  and  as  human  as  you  can.    We’ve  already  started  using  these  principles.  But  we   can  go  much  further.  And  with  each  new  advance  in  technology  is  a  new  relaDonship  with  technology,  and  also  new  applicaDons  of   these  principles  to  the  content  experience.    
    • Thank you Thank you Chris Carter @CyWhisp