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Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
Ch.19   contextualization
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Ch.19 contextualization

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  • 1. Introduction to Missiology Ch. 19 – Contextualization and the Missionary Endeavor
  • 2. Definitions <ul><li>Indigenization – developing a church that is self-governing, self-supporting, self-propagating, and that reflects positive aspects of the local culture in its expression of Christian community and ministry. </li></ul>Contextualization – Enabling the Christian message to become alive as it addresses the core issues of a sociocultural context and transforms people’s worldview, values, and goals
  • 3. Introduction <ul><li>The shift from indigenization to contextualization is the greatest methodological issue facing the Christian mission today – Alan Tippett </li></ul><ul><li>Contextualization implies a deeper involvement in the social issues of the local setting, especially where there is rapid social change </li></ul>
  • 4. New Testament <ul><li>Paul contextualized his message to his audience </li></ul><ul><ul><li>God-fearers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Athenians </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The writers of the gospels contextualized their message to the audience </li></ul>
  • 5. Contemporary Developments - Africa <ul><li>1955 – Ghana – rise of syncretistic indigenous churches points to a problem </li></ul><ul><li>1965 – Nigeria – Consultation of African Theologians </li></ul><ul><ul><li>attempted to express historic Christianity in African cultural forms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Raised issue of the relationship between the gospel and traditional religions </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Contemporary Developments - Latin America <ul><li>1962 – Brazil – Church and Society Movement – dominated by liberation theologians </li></ul><ul><li>1971 – Latin American Theological Fraternity – dialogue among evangelical theologians on issues of contextualization </li></ul>
  • 7. Contemporary Developments – World Council of Churches <ul><li>1968 – Upsala – addressed contextualization in world perspective </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In the struggle for peace and justice the church must bear witness and speak out. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1971 – Bossey, Switzerland </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dogmatic theology fails to address ethical-social issues that arise in times of rapid change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1972 – Theological Education Fund Report </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Issues: social justice, local culture, and universal technological civilization </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. Contemporary Developments – Lausanne Movement <ul><li>1974 – Lausanne – a distinction must be made between the gospel and the cultural forms in which it is expressed </li></ul><ul><li>Latin American Theological Fraternity (FTL) </li></ul><ul><li>The Willowbank Group – theology &amp; education – sought to place greater emphasis on the influence of cultural factors upon the Scriptures as well as upon the reader </li></ul>
  • 9. Lausanne (Con’t) <ul><li>1975 – Detroit – contextualizing in North America </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Minorities in industrialized countries as participants in the theologizing process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encouraged affinity groups to theologize regarding issues in American society &amp; the world </li></ul></ul>
  • 10. Evangelical Boundaries <ul><li>The evangelical framework views the task of contextualization in terms of disengaging the supra-cultural message from a cultural context and enculturating it into another </li></ul><ul><li>Priority is always upon the authority and integrity of the biblical text </li></ul>
  • 11. Key Issues in Contextualization <ul><li>Nature of the Gospel – supracultural or culture bound? </li></ul><ul><li>Authority of Scriptures – normative or parallel significance with the sociocultural context? </li></ul><ul><li>Starting Point – sociocultural context or biblical text? </li></ul><ul><li>Traditional Religions – total continuity, total discontinuity, or another option? </li></ul>
  • 12. Key Issues (con’t) <ul><li>Contextualizing participants – Outsiders, insiders, or combination of both? </li></ul><ul><li>Syncretism – inevitable outcome of pushing contextualization too far? Result OK or non-Christian blend? </li></ul><ul><li>Tools to use – Marxist focus on conflict, functionalist focus on harmony, or another approach? </li></ul>
  • 13. Translation Models of Contextualization <ul><li>Formal Correspondence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Literal, word-for-word translation best carries the message into another culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Institutional parallel between cultures </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Dynamic Equivalence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Meaning-to-meaning translation best carries the message into another culture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizational equivalence to produce NT impact </li></ul></ul>
  • 14. Existential Models of Contextualization <ul><li>Dialectical </li></ul><ul><li>Dialogical </li></ul>
  • 15. Guidelines for the Process <ul><li>Bible the final authority </li></ul><ul><li>Supracultural elements of Scripture preserved </li></ul><ul><li>Local leaders’ theological reflection given precedence </li></ul><ul><li>Local theology informed by historic Christian theology </li></ul>
  • 16. Guidelines (con’t) <ul><li>Syncretism carefully avoided </li></ul><ul><li>Patience and humility by broader Christian community as local contextualization emerges and is tested – it takes time and revision </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate tools for sociocultural analysis provided to local leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Model used that suits both Scripture and context </li></ul>

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