INFO 6800 - Archives•    Announcements•    Archival software•    Debates about provenance•    Seminar presentationshttp://...
Respect des fonds    Fonds           Fonds    Fonds           Fonds  Collection        Fonds    Fonds           Fonds     ...
Respect des fonds                                                                     EthnographicHelen Creighton with the...
Arrangement                                                 Description             Preservation                          ...
ArrangementArranging a fonds at the Dalhousie University ArchivesJanuary 28, 2013                INFO 6800 Archives – Week...
ArrangementPhysically organizing business correspondence at Dalhousie University ArchivesJanuary 28, 2013               IN...
Archival DescriptionJanuary 28, 2013        INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four   7
Archival Description                       Attention to                       Integrated                           use    ...
Archival Description    Level of                  Level of                        Container Arrangement                 De...
How are fonds organized?   Correspondence – Box 1, Folder 3   Photographs – Photo Box 3, Folder 9   Blueprints – Oversized...
How are fonds organized?   Box 1, Folder 3                                Shelf 8, Room B   Photo Box 3, Folder 9         ...
Title. – Date(s) of creation. –Physical description. – Scopeand content. – Notes. –Standard number.  1.0BJanuary 21, 2013 ...
Scenes of OakIsland, N.S. [graphicmaterial]. – 1972. – 13photographs :b&w, mounted oncardstock ; 20 x 17 cm.January 21, 20...
Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013       INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four   14
Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013       INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four   15
Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013       INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four   16
Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013       INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four   17
ICA Atom                                                    Archives and                                                  ...
ICA Atom                                                    Archives and                                                  ...
ICA Atom                                                    Archives and                                                  ...
ICA Atom                                                    Archives and                                                  ...
Archives and                                                    the InternetJanuary 28, 2013   INFO 6800 Archives – Week F...
Archives and                                                    the InternetJanuary 28, 2013   INFO 6800 Archives – Week F...
Archives and                                                    the InternetJanuary 28, 2013   INFO 6800 Archives – Week F...
ArchivesSpace                                                      Archives and                                           ...
ArchivesSpace                                                      Archives and                                           ...
ArchivesSpace                                                      Archives and                                           ...
ArchivesSpace                                                      Archives and                                           ...
ArchivesSpace                                                      Archives and                                           ...
ArchivesSpace                                                      Archives and                                           ...
Debates about ProvenanceJanuary 28, 2013      INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four   31
Debates about ProvenanceDeodato “Postmodernism eschews any (2006) and all sweeping explanations        premised on some ve...
Debates about Provenance    Wurl           “Failing to perceive ethnicity as                   provenance can lead to some...
Debates about ProvenanceHorsman “If any principle should govern (2002) archival theory, it is not the        fonds, but ra...
Visualizing Archives                                                         Archives and                                 ...
Visualizing ArchivesRedefining                                               Archives andProvenance                       ...
Visualizing ArchivesRedefining                                               Archives andProvenance                       ...
Visualizing ArchivesRedefining                                               Archives andProvenance                       ...
Visualizing ArchivesRedefining                                               Archives andProvenance                       ...
More Product, Less Process                                                                  Resource                      ...
Sample finding aids• New York World’s Fair 1939 and 1940  Incorporated Records• Amos Vogel Papers• Oland and Son and Affil...
Sources (in order of appearance)Adams, Scott (2010). Dilbert comic. http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-03-29/.Council of...
Sources (in order of appearance)Horsman, Peter. “The Last Dance of the Phoenix, or the De-discovery of the     Archival Fo...
Sources (in order of appearance)ArchivesSpace screenshots:Millman, David, Mark Matienzo and Katherine Kott (2012). Sustain...
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INFO 6800 (Winter 2013) Week Four: Arrangement and Description

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  • Principle of provenance holds that a fonds must be kept together and not intermingled with other fondsPrinciple of original order holds that records must be kept in the original order that they were created and/or maintainedFonds – The entire body of records of an organization, family, or individual that have been created and accumulated as the result of an organic process reflecting the functions of the creatorThe whole of the DOCUMENTS, regardless of form or medium, automatically and organically created and/or accumulated and used by a particular individual, family, or CORPORATE BODY in the course of that creator's activities or functionsEmphasis on “creatorship”Create the recordsReceive the recordsShare and manipulate information that is in or could become recordsEarly archival theorists adopted the principle of respect des fonds because itAsserted the primary nature of archives as evidenceAsserted the archivist’s primary obligation to protect integrity of evidenceThe concept has been accepted, but...It is “easier to state than define and easier to define than to put into practice”Tension between provenance and original order can make it difficult to identify and describe fondsThe archival fonds is the foundation of archival description standardsBecause it is seen as central to preserving the integrity of recordsIt is impossible to identify a fonds without a clear understanding of the creatorThe fonds cannot be artificial or synthesized after records are createdThis is a “collection” of recordsThe fonds is meant to encompass organizational and personal recordsBut most efforts to define the fonds have focused on organizational recordsMichel Duchein’s five criteria Legal identityClearly defined mandateClearly defined position in administrative hierarchyDegree of autonomy and power of decisionOrganizational chartOther approaches to identifying fondsFocus on record-keepingIs it independent?Is there a board or a committee?Is there a system of documenting decisions? Focus on series, not fondsAnything above series is historical contextTwo approaches to defining an organizational fondsMaximalistThe fonds is defined at the highest level of the organizationMinimalistThe fonds is reduced to the smallest functional cellProblems with maximalist approachLeaves administrative levels unaccounted forLarge organizations would have sub-fonds, sub-sub-fonds, etc.Is it an unacceptable degree of complexity or unfortunate reality?Problems with minimalist approachIgnores or obscures administrative and organizational realitiesThe whole can be lost by too narrow a focus on its componentsStill need to define the organizational hierarchy
  • IN PRACTICE, DEFINING A FONDS CAN BE MUCH MORE DIFFICULTAre the records of a business a fonds? What about the divisions?Are the records of a government agency a fonds? What about the local offices?Does a family create one fonds or several personal fonds?Other challengesOrganizational changesJurisdictional changesRecords spread across several institutionsMixing personal with businessThe writer on a non-profit boardThe family business
  • Archival Processing – The arrangement, description, and housing of archival materials for storage and use by patronsAlso a photography term for processing photographs that are designed to produce very stable, long-lasting imagesWhy Process?Arrangement and description serve a variety of similar purposes They help archivists maintain intellectual and physical control over their holdingsThey help archivists and users find materials in a fonds To ensure that records are seen in the context in which they were createdTo enable records to serve as evidence of the actions that brought them into being
  • Arrangement–The process of organizing materials with respect to their provenance and original order, to protect their context and to achieve physical or intellectual control over the materials– 2. The organization and sequence of items within a collectionArrangement has external (provenance) and internal (original order) dimensionsArrangement is based on system of hierarchical levelsFondsSeriesSub-SeriesFile
  • Eastwood’s rules for arrangementSeparate physical control from intellectual control Identify each component of an accession with the aggregation…to which it belongsEnsure that definitions of agencies and offices are applied consistentlyEastwood’s rules for arrangementIdentify succession of superior agencies over timeIdentify predecessors or successorsIdentify creating office’s relationships and responsibilitiesIdentify series within a creating office or a succession of creating officesIdentifying seriesItems may be grouped within a filing systemItems may be grouped on the basis of similar functionItems may be grouped on the basis of similar contentItems may be grouped by formatOriginal order is evidence that individual documents cannot giveOrder can be imposed if The original order is “chaotic”The original order has been lostThere have been many accrualsIf you impose an order on the records, make note in the finding aidArrangement into series is key step.FunctionSubject/TopicResult from same activity (writings, teaching, etc, may also be specificpositions/occupations for - Secretary of State )Have a particular form/genreStrategiesSurvey entire collection first, break down into categories. Do an arrangement list and processing plan. Share with your supervisor (or Curator?)Avoid over-thinking and re-thinking:Give yourself a time-frame, make informed decision (to the best of your ability), then stick to them.
  • Archival Description – The process of analyzing, organizing, and recording details about the formal elements of a record or collection of records to facilitate the work's identification, management, and understanding– 2. The product of such a processFinding Aid – n. ~ 1. A tool that facilitates discovery of information within a collection of records– 2. A description of records that gives the repository physical and intellectual control over the materials and that assists users to gain access to and understand the materialsIf appraisal is seen as the most critical function of the archivist, arrangement and description are the most practical functionsThey are essential to maintaining control over your holdingsThey are essential for users to access your holdingsDescription was first defined by SAA in 1974 as “the process of establishing intellectual control over holdings through the preparation of finding aids” In 1985, the Canadian Working Group said “it is a major function in the processing of archival material, and the products of this function are finding aids…which give administrators control over their holdings and enable users…to find information about particular topics.”In 1989, the SAA Working Group said it “is the process of capturing, collating, analyzing, and organizing any information that serves to identify, manage, locate, and interpret [archival] holdings…and explain the context and records systems from which those holdings were selected.”There are many definitions and many potential desirable outcomes, but basically archival description is describing archival materials so they can be managed and used. I like this SAA definition, but there are others…Defining essential describable unit has been historical challengeDo we focus on the fonds? Individual documents? Between the 1980s and present day, various national and international description standards were introduced, adopted, and revisedThese standards were meant to codify the practice that had emergedCanada and the U.S. tried to establish a common descriptive standard, but couldn’t agree to certain rulesSo we now have the Rules for Archival Description (RAD) in Canada and Describing Archives: A Content Standard (DACS)in the U.S.There is also the International Standard for Archival Description, or ISAD(G).We’ll look more at these in a second…There is consensus that descriptive standards must conform to central theories of archival profession, rather than vice versaFONDS IS MOST ESSENTIAL UNIT OF RECORDS to which descriptive standards will be applied, at least in CanadaWhat are some kinds of finding aids?Card indexesGuidesInventoriesShelf and container listsRegisters
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • You usually see some kind of retrieval, or reference number in the archival descriptions. These are used by researchers to submit requests and by archivists to retrieve the files from the stacks.
  • The retrieval number is cross referenced against some kind of physical register.
  • According to Rule 1.0B, the areas of description are organized like this:Title and statement of responsibility area. – Date(s) of creation area. – Physical description area. – Archival description area. – Notes area. – Standard number area.Remember, RAD was initially designed for creating and publishing paper-based finding aids.Edition Area1.2A1 – Use this area only in item level description to record statements relating to versions of items existing in two or more versions or states in single or multiple copiesClass of Material Specific Details1.3A1 – Refer to the chapters dealing with the class (classes) of material that are being described3.3A – This area is not used for textual recordsDates of Creation1.4A1 – At an aggregate level of description, use this area for recording date(s) of creation for the unit being described. Do not record a place or date of publication or distribution1.4A1 (continued) – At the item level use this area to record either (a) the date(s) of creation or (b) information about the place, name, date of publishing, distribution, broadcasting, and issuing activitiesPhysical Description area1.5A1 – For all levels of description, record in this area the extent of the unit being described and other physical details or the dimensions when appropriatePublisher’s series area1.6A1 – Use this area only for describing an item bearing a publisher’s or artist’s series title. Do not record here information about an archival seriesArchival Description area1.7A1 – For all levels of description, use this area to present information about the context and content of the unit being described. Administrative/Biographical InfoCustodial HistoryScope and Content1.7A1 (continued) – The Administrative history/Biographical sketch provides information about the external structure or context of the records being described1.7A1 (continued) – The Custodial history gives information about the chain of agencies, officers, or persons, if different from the creator(s), that have exercised custody or control over the records at all stages in their existence1.7A1 (continued) – The Scope and content gives information about the scope of the records (kinds of activities generating them, the period of time, geographical area) and about the substantive matters to which the records pertain1.7B1. Administrative history – At the highest level of description, give information about the history of the corporate body responsible for the creation and/or accumulation and use of the unit being described1.7B1. Administrative history (continued) – Give information relevant to the understanding of the creator’s functions, activities, and relations with other corporate bodies as instructed in the following sub-elements… 1.7B1a –Dates of founding and/or dissolution1.7B1b – Mandate/sphere of functional responsibility, etc.1.7B1c – Predecessor and successor bodies1.7B1e – Administrative structure1.7B1g – Name(s) of chief officers1.7B2. Biographical sketch – At the highest level of description, give information about the history of the person(s) or family(ies) responsible for the creation and/or accumulation and use of the unit being described1.7B2. Biographical sketch (continued) – Give information relevant to the understanding of the creator’s life or activities as instructed in the following sub-elements… 1.7B2a – Name(s)1.7B2b – Place of residence1.7B2c – Education1.7B2d – Occupation, life and activities1.7B2e – Other significant information1.7C. Custodial history – At the highest level of description, give the custodial history of the unit being described. At each subsequent level of description, give the custodial history that pertains to the part being described1.7D. Scope and content – At the fonds, series, and collection levels of description, and when necessary at the file and item levels of description, give information about the scope and internal structure of the records…1.7D2 – For the scope of the series, give information on the specific activity or activities generating the records, the period of time, the subject matter, and the geographical area to which they pertain.Notes area1.8A1 – For all levels of descriptionUse for information that cannot be fitted into to other areas of the descriptionWhen appropriate, combine two or more notes to make one note1.8B – Give notes in the order in which they are listed in RADGive a particular note first when it has been decided that the note is of primary importanceThere are 21 note rules, many with sub rules1.8B2 – Source of title proper1.8B3 – Parallel titles and other title information1.8B5 – Statement(s) of responsibility1.8B8 – Date(s) of creation, including publication, distribution, etc.1.8B9 – Physical description1.8B9a – Physical condition1.8B9b – Conservation1.8B9c – Accompanying material1.8B12 – Immediate source of acquisition1.8B13 – Arrangement 1.8B14 – Language1.8B15 – Originals and reproductions1.8B16 – Restrictions (four sub rules)1.8B17 – Finding aids 1.8B18 – Associated material1.8B19 – Accruals 1.8B21 – General noteStandard number area
  • Here is an example of the reproduction rule.
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Archivists’ ToolkitUsed at Dal
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Hierarchical Description – A technique of writing a finding aid by describing the collection from general to specific, starting with the whole (fonds), then proceeding to the components (sous-fonds, series, subseries, files, and items)Today, archivists create what’s known as multi-level descriptions. A multi-level description is afinding aid or other access tool that consists of separate, interrelated descriptions of the whole and its parts, reflecting the hierarchy of the materials being described.Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of foldersWhat if there is no original order?Represent Admin. Structure/Hierarchy of the organization. Ideally, represent different functions of the organization.Personal PapersBiographicalCorrespondence (or other types of communication)Financial/Medical InformationWritings (or other "Creations")Roles, Occupations, ActivitiesResearch Files/Subject Files/Field Notes/Topical Files/MiscellaneousFormat - Photographs/AV/Size(Chronological Arrangement May Also Work)In practice, description can be quite difficultDecisions about intellectual arrangement can be very difficult with modern archival materialsProviding an adequate degree of information is very time consuming and costlyStandards require attention, training, etc.
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • Series – Files or records within a fonds arranged systematically or maintained as a unit because they relate to a particular function or subject, result from the same activity, have a particular form, or because of some other relationship arising out of their creation, receipt, and/or useSub-Series –A body of documents within a series readily distinguished from the whole by filing arrangement, type, form, or contentFile – A group of documents related by use or topic, typically housed in a folder or group of folders
  • These citations are provided for informational and reference purposes only. Please do not use these citations as examples for formatting your own citations. Refer to style guides.
  • These citations are provided for informational and reference purposes only. Please do not use these citations as examples for formatting your own citations. Refer to style guides.
  • These citations are provided for informational and reference purposes only. Please do not use these citations as examples for formatting your own citations. Refer to style guides.
  • INFO 6800 (Winter 2013) Week Four: Arrangement and Description

    1. 1. INFO 6800 - Archives• Announcements• Archival software• Debates about provenance• Seminar presentationshttp://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-03-29/January 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 1
    2. 2. Respect des fonds Fonds Fonds Fonds Fonds Collection Fonds Fonds Fonds Council of Nova Scotia Archives, 2005January 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 2
    3. 3. Respect des fonds EthnographicHelen Creighton with the Gallagher family, Chebucto Head, ca. 1950 ArchivesJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 3
    4. 4. Arrangement Description Preservation ResourceArchives decision-making diagram AllocationLibrary of Congress January 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 4
    5. 5. ArrangementArranging a fonds at the Dalhousie University ArchivesJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 5
    6. 6. ArrangementPhysically organizing business correspondence at Dalhousie University ArchivesJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 6
    7. 7. Archival DescriptionJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 7
    8. 8. Archival Description Attention to Integrated use descriptionPrinciples Respect des All forms and of RAD fonds mediums Reflects Describe arrangement creatorJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 8
    9. 9. Archival Description Level of Level of Container Arrangement DescriptionFonds Fonds Boxes Series Series Boxes Sub-Series Sub-Series Boxes File File Box-Folder(s) Item Item Folder January 21, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Three 9
    10. 10. How are fonds organized? Correspondence – Box 1, Folder 3 Photographs – Photo Box 3, Folder 9 Blueprints – Oversized File 27 Film reel – Canister 429January 7, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week One 10
    11. 11. How are fonds organized? Box 1, Folder 3 Shelf 8, Room B Photo Box 3, Folder 9 Shelf 2, Room A Oversized File 27 Rack 9, Room B Canister 429 Shelf 4, Room CJanuary 7, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week One 11
    12. 12. Title. – Date(s) of creation. –Physical description. – Scopeand content. – Notes. –Standard number. 1.0BJanuary 21, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Three 12
    13. 13. Scenes of OakIsland, N.S. [graphicmaterial]. – 1972. – 13photographs :b&w, mounted oncardstock ; 20 x 17 cm.January 21, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Three 13
    14. 14. Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 14
    15. 15. Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 15
    16. 16. Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 16
    17. 17. Archivists’ ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 17
    18. 18. ICA Atom Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 18
    19. 19. ICA Atom Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 19
    20. 20. ICA Atom Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 20
    21. 21. ICA Atom Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 21
    22. 22. Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 22
    23. 23. Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 23
    24. 24. Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 24
    25. 25. ArchivesSpace Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 25
    26. 26. ArchivesSpace Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 26
    27. 27. ArchivesSpace Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 27
    28. 28. ArchivesSpace Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 28
    29. 29. ArchivesSpace Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 29
    30. 30. ArchivesSpace Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 30
    31. 31. Debates about ProvenanceJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 31
    32. 32. Debates about ProvenanceDeodato “Postmodernism eschews any (2006) and all sweeping explanations premised on some version of monolithic human experience. In contrast, postmodernists emphasis the diversity of human experience and the multiplicity of perspectives arising there from.” Redefining ProvenanceJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 32
    33. 33. Debates about Provenance Wurl “Failing to perceive ethnicity as provenance can lead to some (2005) unfortunate results…Without a full appreciation for the contextual whole of ethnic community development, efforts to document this dimension of society can take on a fragmentary and narrow approach. When ethnicity is not viewed as provenance, it tends to be viewed simply as a subject area or "theme," like education, labor, sports, or the arts.” Redefining ProvenanceJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 33
    34. 34. Debates about ProvenanceHorsman “If any principle should govern (2002) archival theory, it is not the fonds, but rather the visualization through description of functional structures, both internal and external: archival narratives about those multiple relationships.” Redefining ProvenanceJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 34
    35. 35. Visualizing Archives Archives and the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 35
    36. 36. Visualizing ArchivesRedefining Archives andProvenance the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 36
    37. 37. Visualizing ArchivesRedefining Archives andProvenance the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 37
    38. 38. Visualizing ArchivesRedefining Archives andProvenance the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 38
    39. 39. Visualizing ArchivesRedefining Archives andProvenance the InternetJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 39
    40. 40. More Product, Less Process Resource Allocationhttp://derangementanddescription.wordpress.com/tag/more-product-less-process/January 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 40
    41. 41. Sample finding aids• New York World’s Fair 1939 and 1940 Incorporated Records• Amos Vogel Papers• Oland and Son and Affiliated Companies• Salman Rushdie PapersJanuary 30, 2012 Week Four – Archival Processing
    42. 42. Sources (in order of appearance)Adams, Scott (2010). Dilbert comic. http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-03-29/.Council of Nova Scotia Archives. Fonds diagram. http://www.councilofnsarchives.ca/ArchWay.Helen Creighton with the Gallagher family, Chebucto Head (ca. 1950). http://www.helencreighton.org/photos/HCphotos/files/page6-1005- full.html.The First Panchen Lama, Lobzang Chökyi Gyaltsen (detail); Tsang Province, Tibet; 18th century; Rubin Museum of Art; F1996.21.2 (HAR 477). http://www.rmanyc.org/nav/exhibitions/view/1562.Library of Congress (2010). Archival decision making process diagram. http://www.loc.gov/rr/mss/prep.html.Deodato, Joseph. “Becoming Responsible Mediators: The Application of Postmodern Perspectives to Archival Arrangement and Description.” Progressive Librarian 27 (Summer 2006): 52-63. http://www.progressivelibrariansguild.org/PL_Jnl/pdf/PL27_summer2006.pd f.January 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 42
    43. 43. Sources (in order of appearance)Horsman, Peter. “The Last Dance of the Phoenix, or the De-discovery of the Archival Fonds.” Archivaria 54 (Fall 2002): 1-23.International Council on Archives (2000). Model of the levels of arrangement of a fonds. In International Standard for Archival Description (General), p. 36. http://www.ica.org/10207/standards/isadg-general-international- standard-archival-description-second-edition.html.John Tagliabue Papers visualization (2009). http://www- 958.ibm.com/software/analytics/manyeyes/visualizations/john- tagliabue-papers-edmund-s-mus.Archivists’ Toolkit screenshots (2009). https://staff.lib.ncsu.edu/confluence/display/MNC/Archivists%27+ToolkitJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 43
    44. 44. Sources (in order of appearance)ArchivesSpace screenshots:Millman, David, Mark Matienzo and Katherine Kott (2012). Sustaining ArchivesSpace. Presentation at DLF Forum, November 4, 2012. http://www.archivesspace.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/DLF- Forum_11042012_final.pdf.Photographs of Dalhousie University Archives and the Killam Library were taken by Dalhousie Libraries staffJanuary 28, 2013 INFO 6800 Archives – Week Four 44

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