INFO 6800 (Winter 2013) Week Eleven: Access, Privacy, and Outreach

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Slides for week eleven of INFO 6800 Archives (Winter 2013).

Slides for week eleven of INFO 6800 Archives (Winter 2013).

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  • Access– The ability to locate relevant information through the use of catalogs, indexes, finding aids, or other toolsThe permission to locate and retrieve information for use within legally established restrictions of privacy, confidentiality, and security clearanceRestriction – Limitations on an individual’s access to or use of materialsAccess restrictionsUse restrictionsAccess restrictions – May be defined by a period of time or by a class of individuals allowed or denied accessThey may be designed to protect personal privacy or classified information, or to preserve materialUse restrictions – May limit what can be done with materials, or they may place qualifications on useCan include conditions or restrictions on copying, quoting, or publishingCan be imposed by legislation or donors
  • Access– The ability to locate relevant information through the use of catalogs, indexes, finding aids, or other toolsThe permission to locate and retrieve information for use within legally established restrictions of privacy, confidentiality, and security clearance
  • Types of access servicesReference servicesReproduction servicesResearch servicesHandling access to information requestsDigital collectionsExhibitionsProduction of research guidesOther outreach activities
  • Archives Reference - A service to aid users in locating materials relevant to their interestsReference Interview- A conversation between an archivist and a researcher designed to give the researcher an orientation to the use of the materials, to help the researcher identify relevant holdings, and to ensure that research needs are metTypes of reference servicesOn-site (reference desk)Single service pointMultiple service pointsEmail / TelephoneLive Help?
  • Common reference questions includeGenealogyLocal historyBuildingsPhotographsHistoricalevents
  • Common reference resources includeReference collectionsFinding aidsCard catalogues and indicesSubject guidesDigital collectionsInstitutional repositories
  • Challenges of public service includeScope/volume of material Physical condition of materialLegibility of materialMaintenance of subject guides, research guides, etc.Identifying research needsIdentifying alternative sources of informationAccess and use restrictions
  • Exit interview - A conversation that is designed to evaluate the success of the visit and the effectiveness of the services offered
  • The quality or state of being free from public scrutinyThe quality or state of having one’s personal information or activities protected from unauthorized use by anotherArchives must deal with conflicting access and privacy issuesPersonal right to privacyDonor’s right to restrict materialsApplicable legislation protecting right to access and right to privacyGovernment secrecy (privileged and non-privileged)Corporate knowledge / I.P.Desire to provide access to materials
  • Legislation facilitating public access to information (and the protection of privacy) has been enacted in many jurisdictionsSunshine Law – A statute requiring public access to meetings and records of a governmental bodyNot all records in a given jurisdiction are subject to all access and privacy legislationNot all archives in a given jurisdiction are subject to all access and privacy legislation
  • Access to Information Act –A Canadian federal law providing the right of access to information under the control of a government institutionIntroduced in 1983Access to Information Act declaresGovernment information should be available to the publicNecessary exemptions should be limited and specificDisclosure decisions should be independently reviewedAccess to Information Act applies toAny department or ministry of state for the Government of CanadaAny parent Crown corporation and wholly-owned subsidiaries
  • The Privacy Act – A Canadian federal law that sets out rules for how institutions of the federal government must deal with the personal information of individualsIt only applies to federal government institutions and Crown corporationsThe Privacy Act declaresA government institution may not collect personal information unless it relates directly to an operating program or activity of the institutionThe Privacy Act declares, with some exceptionsA government institution must inform individuals of the purpose for which the information is being collectedPersonal information may only be used for the purpose for which the information was obtained unless the individual consentsPersonal information may not be disclosed, unless the individual consents
  • The Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) – A Canadian federal law that governs how private-sector organizations collect, use, and disclose personal information in the course of commercial businessPIPEDA gives individuals the right toKnow why an organization collects, uses, or discloses their personal informationExpect an organization to use personal information appropriately and only with consentObtain access to their personal information and ask for corrections if necessaryComplain about how an organization handles their personal informationPIPEDA requires organizations to Obtain consent when they collect, use, or disclose personal informationSupply a product or service even if an individual refuses consent (unless the info is essential)Have policies that are clear, understandable, and readily available
  • Nova Scotia Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIPOP) – First provincial access legislation in Canada (originally passed in 1977 as the Freedom of Information Act)Expanded in 1993 and again with the Municipal Government Act in 1999FOIPOPgives individuals the right toAccess records in the custody or under the control of a public bodyThe right of protection of the privacy of your personal information in the custody or under the control of a public bodyFOIPOP applies to Provincial government institutionsMost provincial agencies and boardsUniversities and school boardsHospitals Formal FOIPOP requests must be made to the relevant FOIPOP administratorNSARM Routine Access Policy - Is designed to provide an opportunity for people to obtain access to certain categories of records without a formal application under FOIPOP
  • Personal Information International Disclosure Protection Act – A Nova Scotia provincial law that protects the personal information of Nova Scotians from international disclosureThe act applies to public bodies, directors of public bodies, and service providers for public bodies
  • Freedom of Information Act – A U.S. federal law (5 USC §552) that describes an individual's rights to access information held by a government agency, as well as the agency's legal authority to refuse access to such informationFOIA allows for the deletion of details to prevent a “clearly unwarranted invasion of personal privacy”The act excludes defense, foreign policy, and trade secrets, confidential financial or commercial information, intra-governmental communications, personnel, and medical filesMost U.S. states have similar laws, though the names may varyOpen Records LawSunshine Law
  • Outreach–The process of identifying and providing services to constituencies with needs relevant to the repository's mission, especially underserved groups, and tailoring services to meet those needsMay include exhibits, workshops, publications, and public programs
  • “Archivists tend to think about their work in the order in which it is performed. Inevitably, use comes last. Since use of archival materials is the goal to which all other activities are directed, archivists need to re-examine their priorities.”Pre-1982, the core archival functions ended with referenceIn 1982 Elsie Freeman delivered presentation on public programmingPederson and Casterline’s public programming manual was also publishedArchivists now tend to view reference services and public programs as interrelated This parallels the discussion in the library and museum communities about improving relations with users
  • Different audiences to focus onResearchersNon-researchersGovernment officialsTourism communityOther resource allocatorsDonorsProspective donorsUnderserved community members
  • Potential outreach programsWorkshopsLecturesParticipate in regional or national programs (e.g., Archives Month, Freedom to Read, National History Day, etc.)Volunteer time at local schoolsOrganize walking tour of a neighbourhood documented in archivesWrite letters to the editors of local newspapersInvite local media for tour of facilitiesInvite municipal, regional, and federal government officials for tour of facilities or to participate in public programsBroadcast your archives’ message on local media outletsMaintain relations with regional and national archives associations to keep aware of programs and eventsExhibitsDigital collections (ideally launched at a time for optimal exposure)Establish “visitor experience” program to structure, measure, and evaluate user experiences
  • These citations are provided for informational and reference purposes only. Please do not use these citations as examples for formatting your own citations. Refer to style guides.
  • These citations are provided for informational and reference purposes only. Please do not use these citations as examples for formatting your own citations. Refer to style guides.
  • These citations are provided for informational and reference purposes only. Please do not use these citations as examples for formatting your own citations. Refer to style guides.

Transcript

  • 1. INFO 6800 - Archives• Announcements• Access and privacy• Seminar presentation• Outreach exercisehttp://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-05-06/March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 1
  • 2. Access to Information Donors Researchers Access Archivists External FactorsMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 2
  • 3. Access to InformationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 3
  • 4. Access to Information• Reference services• Reproduction services• What are some Research services• Handling access to information requests types of access• Digital collections and exhibitions services?• Production of research guides• Other outreach activities Resource AllocationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 4
  • 5. Archives ReferenceMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 5
  • 6. Archives Reference Resource AllocationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 6
  • 7. Archives Reference What are some GenealogyLocal history Buildings common reference Historical questions? Photographs eventsMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 7
  • 8. Archives Reference Reference Card WhatFinding aidssome collections are catalogues common reference Subject Digital guides resources? Repositories collectionsMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 8
  • 9. Archives Reference• Scope/volume of material•• What are some Physical condition of material Legibility of material• Maintenance of subject guides, research public service guides, etc.• Identifying research needs challenges?• Identifying alternative sources• Access and use restrictions Resource AllocationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 9
  • 10. Archives Reference Resource AllocationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 10
  • 11. Access to InformationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 11
  • 12. Access to InformationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 12
  • 13. Access to InformationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 13
  • 14. Access to InformationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 14
  • 15. PrivacyMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 15
  • 16. Privacy Right to Right to Privacy What do archivists privacy restrict legislation need to know Access Government Right to aboutsecrecy legislation privacy? knowMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 16
  • 17. Access and Privacy Legislation• Not all records in a given jurisdiction are subject to all access and privacy legislation• Not all archives in a given jurisdiction are subject to all access and privacy legislationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 17
  • 18. Access and Privacy Legislation• Access to Information Act – A Canadian federal law providing the right of access to information under the control of a government institution• Introduced in 1983March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 18
  • 19. Access and Privacy Legislation• The Privacy Act – A Canadian federal law that sets out rules for how institutions of the federal government must deal with the personal information of individuals• It only applies to federal government institutions and Crown corporationsMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 19
  • 20. Access and Privacy Legislation• The Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act (PIPEDA) – A Canadian federal law that governs how private-sector organizations collect, use, and disclose personal information in the course of commercial businessMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 20
  • 21. Access and Privacy Legislation• Nova Scotia Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIPOP) – First provincial access legislation in Canada (originally passed in 1977 as the Freedom of Information Act)• Expanded in 1993 and again with the Municipal Government Act in 1999March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 21
  • 22. Access and Privacy Legislation• Formal FOIPOP requests must be made to the relevant FOIPOP administrator• NSARM Routine Access Policy - Is designed to provide an opportunity for people to obtain access to certain categories of records without a formal application under FOIPOPMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 22
  • 23. Access and Privacy Legislation• Personal Information International Disclosure Protection Act – A Nova Scotia provincial law that protects the personal information of Nova Scotians from international disclosure• The act applies to public bodies, directors of public bodies, and service providers for public bodiesMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 23
  • 24. Access and Privacy Legislation• Freedom of Information Act – A U.S. federal law (5 USC §552) that describes an individuals rights to access information held by a government agency, as well as the agencys legal authority to refuse access to such informationMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 24
  • 25. Archival Outreach• Outreach – The process of identifying and providing services to constituencies with needs relevant to the repositorys mission, especially underserved groups, and tailoring services to meet those needs• May include exhibits, workshops, publications, and public programsMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 25
  • 26. Archival Outreach• “Archivists tend to think about their work in the order in which it is performed. Inevitably, use comes last. Since use of archival materials is the goal to which all other activities are directed, archivists need to re-examine their priorities.”March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 26
  • 27. Archival Outreach - Audiences• Researchers• Non-researchers• Government officials• Tourism community• Other resource allocators• Donors• Prospective donors• Underserved community membersMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 27
  • 28. Archival Outreach Regional / Workshops K-12 school National What are some & Lectures programs programs Letters to Government Media common outreach editor relations broadcasts Archivesprograms? Visitor Exhibits experienceassociations programsMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 28
  • 29. Archival OutreachMarch 18, 2013 Week Eleven 29
  • 30. Sources (in order of appearance)Adams, Scott (1995). Dilbert comic. http://dilbert.com/strips/comic/2010-05- 06/.BC Archives Reference Room Map. http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/general/orientmp.htm.Reference Library, The City of Surrey, BC. http://www.surrey.ca/culture- recreation/9821.aspx.Reference Interview, Archives of Ontario. http://www.archives.gov.on.ca/english/about/archives- unboxed/archivist.aspx.Exit Interview Cartoon. http://www.brainstuck.com/2008/11/17/more- money/.Exit Interview script cover. http://www.stageplays.com/products/the_exit_interview/William%20Mi ssouri%20Downs.Access to information cartoon. http://edocs.lib.sfu.ca/cgi- bin/Cartoons?CartoonID=7286.March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 30
  • 31. Sources (in order of appearance) Open access logo. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_access. Freedom of information logo. http://uofowatch.blogspot.ca/2012/11/information-and-privacy- commissioner.html. Iceberg image. http://www.searchtools.com/slides/intranets2005/intranet- search-2005.html. GUI settings cartoon. http://www.personal.psu.edu/scd5029/blogs/was_ist_das/2007/10/. User/software quote image. http://www.rsc- northwest.ac.uk/acl/eMagArchive/RSCeMag0809/Tools4AllMenu/glogste r.html. Information Desk, Tokyo. http://www.flickr.com/photos/metropol2/149294506/. Cloak of secrecy cartoon. http://blogs.usembassy.gov/costarica/. Right to privacy cartoon. http://www.michellehenry.fr/humanr.htm.March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 31
  • 32. Sources (in order of appearance)Chris Slane’s privacy cartoon. http://www.slane.co.nz/privacycartoons.html.March 18, 2013 Week Eleven 32