A civil rights movement timeline, 1954 1969

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A civil rights movement timeline, 1954 1969

  1. 1. A Civil Rights Movement Timeline, 1954-1969 Created by the 5 th -grade Library Class at Webster Christian School
  2. 2. 1954 1955 1968 1965 1964 1963 1956 1961 1957 Rosa Parks arrested School segregation illegal Montgomery Bus Boycott begins Little Rock 9 Greensboro Sit-in SNCC founded 1960 MLK’s house bombed Bus boycott ends Freedom rides begin The Children’s Crusade “ I Have a Dream” speech King Awarded Nobel Malcolm X assassinated Police attack demonstrators in Selma MLK shot Civil Rights Act passed Voting Rights Act Birmingham church bombing 
  3. 3. School Segregation Illegal, 1954 <ul><li>The Supreme Court made school segregation illegal, 1954. </li></ul><ul><li>This act is called Brown v. The Board of Education </li></ul><ul><li>By: Loren. </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:School_segregation_protest.jpg By Ske at fr.wikipedia (Transferred from fr.wikipedia) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  4. 4. Rosa Parks Arrested, 1955 <ul><li>Rosa Parks is arrested in Montgomery, Alabama for not giving up her seat on the bus. </li></ul><ul><li>The back was for blacks and the front was for whites. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Sydney </li></ul>Photo credit: This work is in the public domain in the U.S.: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/22/Rosaparks_policereport.jpg/474px-Rosaparks_policereport.jpg
  5. 5. Montgomery Bus Boycott begins, 1955 <ul><li>It began because teenager Claudette Colvin and Rosa Parks refused to give their seats to a white person. </li></ul><ul><li>They felt that just because their skin color is black doesn’t mean they had to move. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Lauren. </li></ul>http:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rosa_parks_bus.jpg By Rmhermen at en.wikipedia (photo by rmhermen) [GFDL (<A class=&quot;external free&quot; href= http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html rel=nofollow>http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html</A>) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 ( www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ )], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  6. 6. Little Rock Nine, 1957 <ul><li>Nine teenagers were chosen to go to an all-white high school. </li></ul><ul><li>Police tried to stop them but the President sent the Army to protect them. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Breana </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:101st_Airborne_at_Little_Rock_Central_High.jpg By US Army (US Army) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  7. 7. Greensboro Sit-in, 1960 <ul><li>Four kids sat at a white only restaurant. </li></ul><ul><li>They wanted food. They wouldn’t serve them. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Nathan. </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Greensboro_sit-in_counter.jpg By Mark Pellegrini (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-2.5 ( www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5 )], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  8. 8. Freedom Rides Begin, 1961 <ul><li>White and African American civil rights people set out from Washington, D.C. </li></ul><ul><li>They traveled on buses to the South to test a U.S. Supreme Court decision that said interstate bus stations had to be integrated. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Laura </li></ul>Photo credit: http:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lewiszwerg.jpg By author (photo of a museum exhibit) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  9. 9. The Children’s Crusade, 1963 <ul><li>The Children’s Crusade is when children participated and help get their freedom. </li></ul><ul><li>Some children would let themselves be arrested to show they were brave. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Emily </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/ File:Abernathy_Children_on_front_line_leading_the_SELMA_TO_MONTGOMERY_MARCH_for_the_RIGHT_TO_VOTE.JPG By Abernathy Family (Abernathy Family Photos) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  10. 10. “I Have A Dream” Speech, 1963 <ul><li>Dr. King gave this speech at the March on Washington. </li></ul><ul><li>250,000 black and white people attended the speech. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Erik. </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Martin_Luther_King_-_March_on_Washington.jpg By Unknown? [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  11. 11. Birmingham Church Bombing, 1963 <ul><li>On Sunday, Sept. 15, 1963, a bomb blew up the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. </li></ul><ul><li>4 African American girls who were in the church died. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Daniel </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:04298v_cropped.JPG By O'Halloran, Thomas J., photographer [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  12. 12. King Awarded Nobel Peace Prize, 1964 <ul><li>When Martin won the Nobel Peace Prize, he shouted for joy. </li></ul><ul><li>His whole family went to Norway to get the prize. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Alexandra. </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Martin_Luther_King_Jr_NYWTS_5.jpg By Herman Hiller / New York World-Telegram & Sun [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  13. 13. Malcolm X is Assassinated, 1965 <ul><li>On February 21, 1965, Malcolm X was assassinated in New York City. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Daniel G. </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:MLK_and_Malcolm_X_USNWR_cropped-2.jpg By Marion S. Trikosko, U.S. News & World Report Magazine [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  14. 14. Police Attack Demonstrators in Selma, 1965 <ul><li>March 7 became known as “Bloody Sunday” in Selma, Alabama. </li></ul><ul><li>Over 50 people were killed or injured in this act. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Lilly. </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bloody_Sunday-officers_await_demonstrators.jpeg By Kevin Saff at en.wikipedia [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  15. 15. Voting Rights Act, 1965 <ul><li>President Johnson signed the Voting Rights Act of 1965. </li></ul><ul><li>This act said that all citizens had the right to vote. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Mrs. Satta </li></ul>Photo credit: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LyndonJohnson_signs_Voting_Rights_Act_of_1965.jpg By Yoichi R. Okamoto [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  16. 16. MLK Shot, 1968 <ul><li>Martin Luther King, Jr., was shot to death on the balcony of his hotel. </li></ul><ul><li>He was buried in Atlanta, Georgia. </li></ul><ul><li>By: LeeAnn </li></ul>Photo credit: ttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Martin-Luther-King-1964-leaning-on-a-lectern.jpg By Trikosko, Marion S. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  17. 17. Civil Rights Act Passed, 1968 <ul><li>President Johnson signed the Second Civil Rights Act. </li></ul><ul><li>It is also known as the Fair Housing Act. </li></ul><ul><li>By: Andrew </li></ul>  Photo credit: http:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lbjsigningbill.jpg By Warren K. Leffler, U.S. News & World Report [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons from Wikimedia Commons
  18. 18. 1954 1955 1968 1965 1964 1963 1956 1961 1957 Rosa Parks arrested School segregation illegal Montgomery Bus Boycott begins Little Rock 9 Greensboro Sit-in SNCC founded 1960 MLK’s house bombed Bus boycott ends Freedom rides begin The Children’s Crusade “ I Have a Dream” speech King Awarded Nobel Malcolm X assassinated Police attack demonstrators in Selma MLK shot Civil Rights Act passed Voting Rights Act Birmingham church bombing 
  19. 19. Thanks for viewing our presentation! Created January 2010 Webster Christian School Webster, NY

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