Copyright What Do You Know Online
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Transcript

  • 1. Copyright
–
What
do
you
Know?

Focus
on
Online
 Learning
 
 Read
the
following
situations.
Is
it
copyright
infringement
or
not?
 1.
You’re
teaching
Sociology
and
you
have
a
chapter
from
 Yes
 No
 an
old
textbook
that
you
want
your
students
to
read.
You
 scan
it
and

put
it
in
your
LMS
course.
They
like
it
so
much
 you
use
it
very
semester.

 
 2.
You
record
an
episode
of
the
Sopranos
from
cable.
You
 Yes
 No
 decide
it’s
a
good
example
of
criminal
activity,
so
you
 convert
it
to
MP4
and
upload
it
in
your
Intro
to
 Criminology
class.

 
 3.
You
record
a
program
from
PBS’s
Nova
in
October,
 Yes
 No
 convert
to
MP4
and
upload
it
to
show
in
your
online
class
 next
March.
 
 4.
You
encourage
creativity
in
your
students.
For
a
project,
 Yes
 No
 one
group
creates
a
video
based
on
the
CSI
television
 show
and
uploads
it
to
the
course
LMS
site.

 
 5.
In
your
online
class,
a
student
describes
his
idea
for
an
 Yes
 No
 article
on
the
discussion
board.
You
encourage
him
to
 write
the
article
and
submit
it.
A
year
later,
you’re
reading
 a
journal
and
see
an
article
about
that
very
idea,
down
to
 the
specifics,
but
it’s
by
a
different
student.
 
 6.
You
teach
Biology.
You
convert
a
portion
of
a
VHS
movie
 Yes
 No
 you
own
to
MPG4
and
upload
it
to
your
class
blog.
 
 7.
One
of
your
students
creates
a
video
for
your
class.
In
 Yes
 No
 the
play,
a
character
sings
Happy
Birthday.

The
video
is
 uploaded
to
YouTube.
 
 8.
You
scan
a
political
cartoon
and
include
it
in
a
 Yes
 No
 PowerPoint
presentation
which
you
upload
to
the
LMS.


 
 9.
You’re
in
the
car
listening
to
the
radio.
You
hear
a
song
 Yes
 No
 that
illustrates
perfectly
the
concept
you
want
discuss
in
 class
the
next
day.
You
go
home
and
download
the
song
 from
iTunes.
You
insert
it
into
your
PowerPoint

and
after
 Office
of
Educational
Enhancement
(OEE)
–
972­883­6960
–
oee@utdallas.edu
–
http://oee.utdallas.edu
–
HH
2.406

  • 2. class,
load
the
PowerPoint
to
your
website.

 
 10.
Your
students
are
struggling
with
a
written
 Yes
 No
 assignment.
You
find
an
old
paper
from
a
student
last
year
 and
upload
it
to
show
students
a
good
example.
You
make
 sure
to
remove
the
student’s
name
and
any
grading
marks.
 
 11.
You
find
a
great
article
online
that
you
want
to
share
 Yes
 No
 with
a
colleague.
You
copy
the
URL
in
an
email
that
you
 send
to
your
colleague.
 
 12.
You
teach
Film
Studies.
Your
department
has
 Yes
 No
 purchased
a
DVD
for
use
in
the
classroom.
You
digitize
a
 small
portion
to
illustrate
a
particular
film
concept.

 
 13.
You
have
taped
interviews
of
several
veterans.
With
 Yes
 No
 their
permission,
you
edited
the
tapes
into
a
montage
 video
and
posted
it
on
YouTube.
A
few
months
later,
you
 find
out
that
an
instructor
at
another
university
has
 downloaded
the
video
and
used
it
in
her
class.
 
 14.
You
find
a
website
that
has
a
really
cool
form
to
collect
 Yes
 No
 information.
You
copy
the
source
code
and
adapt
it
 slightly
to
fit
your
purposes.
You
use
this
form
on
your
 website.

 
 15.
Your
students
will
do
a
project.
You
download
images
 Yes
 No
 and
photos
from
various
non‐commercial
websites
and
 store
them

in
a
WebCT
folder

for
the
students
to
access.
 
 16.
You
assign
a
multimedia
project
to
your
students.
They
 Yes
 No
 combine
text,
video,
audio
and
images

and
create
a
video
 on
YouTube.

 
 17.
You’re
in
the
library
reading
an
interesting
article
in
 Yes
 No
 the
latest
issue
of
a
journal
in
your
discipline
and
you’d
 like
to
incorporate
the
research
into
your
online
class
 lecture
notes.
You
make
a
photocopy
of
the
article
to
take
 home
with
you
to
prepare
the
lecture.

 
 18.

Several
of
your
students
haven’t
got
the
textbook
yet.

 Yes
 No
 You
make
a
scan
of
the
first
chapter
for
them
so
they
 won’t
get
behind
and
post
it
online
in
Blackboard.
 
 19.
You
record
yourself
and
a
few
friends
reading
Hamlet.
 Yes
 No
 You
post
the
audio
file
in
several
clips
online.

 Office
of
Educational
Enhancement
(OEE)
–
972­883­6960
–
oee@utdallas.edu
–
http://oee.utdallas.edu
–
HH
2.406

  • 3. 
 20.
You’re
teaching
an
online
class.
You
need
an
picture
of
 Yes
 No
 the
Eiffel
Tower.
You
go
to
the
library
and
find
a
book
of
 images
published
in
1918.
You
check
it
out,
go
home
and
 scan
a
picture.
You
place
this
image
on
your
faculty
 webpage.
 
 
 
 
 Copyright
–
What
do
you
Know?
 
 Read
the
following
situations.
Is
it
copyright
infringement
or
not?
 Answers:
 
 1.
You’re
teaching
Sociology
and
you
have
a
chapter
from
 Yes
 
 an
old
textbook
that
you
want
your
students
to
read.
You
 scan
it
and

put
it
in
your
LMS
course.
They
like
it
so
much
 you
use
it
very
semester.

 This
is
infringement
for
several
reasons:
 1. You
use
it
more
than
one
semester.
 2. You
are
not
allowed
to
copy/digitize
from
materials
created
for
 educational
use.
 2.
You
record
an
episode
of
the
Sopranos
from
cable.
You
 Yes
 
 decide
it’s
a
good
example
of
criminal
activity,
so
you
 convert
it
to
MP4
and
upload
it
in
your
Intro
to
 Criminology
class.
 You
cannot
copy
and/or
reproduce
materials
from
pay
services.
 3.
You
record
a
program
from
PBS’s
Nova
in
October,
 Yes
 
 convert
to
MP4
and
upload
it
to
show
in
your
online
class
 next
March.
 You
must
show
the
recorded
program
within
10
days
of
the
recording
 and
destroy
the
recording
after
45
days.
It
doesn’t
matter
if
it
was
on
 public
television.

 4.
You
encourage
creativity
in
your
students.
For
a
project,
 Yes
 No
 one
group
creates
a
video
based
on
the
CSI
television
 show
and
uploads
it
to
the
course
LMS
site.
 Maybe.
Did
they
in
essence
write
an
episode
of
CSI,
using
the
same
 characters?
Or
did
they
write
a
satirical
interpretation
of
the
show?
 Parody
is
allowed
under
fair
use.
(Think
Saturday
Night
Live!)
 Office
of
Educational
Enhancement
(OEE)
–
972­883­6960
–
oee@utdallas.edu
–
http://oee.utdallas.edu
–
HH
2.406

  • 4. 5.
In
your
online
class,
a
student
describes
his
idea
for
an
 Yes
 No
 article
on
the
discussion
board.
You
encourage
him
to
 write
the
article
and
submit
it.
A
year
later,
you’re
reading
 a
journal
and
see
an
article
about
that
very
idea,
down
to
 the
specifics,
but
it’s
by
a
different
student.
 Maybe.

Ideas
themselves
cannot
be
copyrighted.
But
the
particular
 expression
of
them
can
be.
Does
the
published
article
contain
significant
 identifiable
sentences
or
paragraphs?

 6.
You
teach
Biology.
You
convert
a
portion
of
a
VHS
movie
 Yes
 No
 you
own
to
MPG4
and
upload
it
to
your
class
blog.
 It
depends
on
several
factors:
(1)
how
much
did
you
digitize?
You
are
 allowed
30%

or
3
minutes,
whichever
is
less.

(2)
Is
your
blog
password­ protected?
If
not,
then
you
cannot
claim
fair
use.
 7.
One
of
your
students
creates
a
video
for
your
class.
In
 Yes
 No
 the
play,
a
character
sings
Happy
Birthday.

The
video
is
 uploaded
to
YouTube.
 Yes
–
Happy
Birthday
is
under
copyright.
If
it’s
a
one­time
performance,
 you
might
fall
under
fair
use.
However,
since
the
student’s
video
is
 performed
every
time
the
video
is
played,
permission
is
required.
 8.
You
teach
Biology.
You
convert
a
portion
of
a
VHS
movie
 Yes
 No
 you
own
to
MPG4
and
upload
it
to
your
class
blog.
 Maybe.
You
might
fall
under
fair
use,
as
long
as
the
portion
wasn’t
very
 long
(3
minutes
or
10%,
the
lesser).
Ideally,
materials
should
be
 institutionally­owned.

And
as
long
as
you
don’t
use
it
again
next
 semester.
If
you
want
to
use
it
over
and
over,
request
permission
from
the
 copyright
holder.
 9.
You’re
in
the
car
listening
to
the
radio.
You
hear
a
song
 Yes
 No
 that
illustrates
perfectly
the
concept
you
want
discuss
in
 class
the
next
day.
You
go
home
and
download
the
song
 from
iTunes.
You
insert
it
into
your
PowerPoint

and
after
 class,
load
the
PowerPoint
to
your
website.

 Maybe.
Did
you
use
the
entire
song?
Is
your
website
open
to
the
public
or
 is
in
WebCT?
Will
you
use
the
song
in
the
PowerPoint
next
semester
or
 will
you
keep
it
on
your
website
for
more
than
a
semester?
Even
if
you
 used
the
entire
song,
you
might
fall
under
fair
use
if
the
time
between
 when
you
heard
the
song
(or
had
the
idea
to
use
it)
and
the
lecture
was
 very
short
–
unreasonable
to
request
and
gain
permission).

You
can
fall
 under
fair
use
if
you
use
only
10%
of
the
song,
but
only
if
you
don’t
use
it
 semester
after
semester.
You
cannot
put
your
PowerPoint
on
an
open
 website.

 10.
Your
students
are
struggling
with
a
written
 Yes
 
 assignment.
You
find
an
old
paper
from
a
student
last
year
 and
upload
it
to
show
students
a
good
example.
You
make
 sure
to
remove
the
student’s
name
and
any
grading
marks.

 Yes.
Students
own
the
copyright
to
their
intellectual
work,
even
if
done
 for
a
class.
 Office
of
Educational
Enhancement
(OEE)
–
972­883­6960
–
oee@utdallas.edu
–
http://oee.utdallas.edu
–
HH
2.406

  • 5. 11.
You
find
a
great
article
online
that
you
want
to
share
 
 No
 with
a
colleague.
You
copy
the
URL
in
an
email
that
you
 send
to
you
colleague.
 No.
You
can
copy
URLs
and
send
them
on
–
you
are
merely
pointing
to
 the
article.
You
would
have
infringed
if
you
had
made
a
pdf
copy
if
it
and
 forwarded
the
article
in
email.
 12.
You
teach
Film
Studies.
Your
department
has
 
 No
 purchased
a
DVD
for
use
in
the
classroom.
You
digitize
a
 small
portion
to
illustrate
a
particular
film
concept.
 No.
From
November
27,
2006
­
October
27,
2009,
media
studies
faculty
 were
allowed
to
make
digital
copies
of
small
portions
of
films.
The
 Register
of
the
Copyright
extended
this
exemption
to
the
DMCA
 indefinitely
October
29,
2009.
But
keep
an
eye
out;
this
could
change.
 13.
You
have
taped
interviews
of
several
veterans.
With
 
 No
 their
permission,
you
edited
the
tapes
into
a
montage
 video
and
posted
it
on
YouTube.
A
few
months
later,
you
 find
out
that
an
instructor
at
another
university
has
 downloaded
the
video
and
used
it
in
her
class.
 Just
as
you
can
use
works
by
others
for
educational
use,
so
can
others
use
 your
work.
 14.
You
find
a
website
that
has
a
really
cool
form
to
collect
 Yes
 
 information.
You
copy
the
source
code
and
adapt
it
 slightly
to
fit
your
purposes.
You
use
this
form
on
your
 website.

 If
the
source
code
and
look
of
the
form
is
distinctive,
it
may
fall
under
 copyright.
If
it’s
general
form
–
with
generally­used
code,
you
may
fall
 under
fair
use.
 15.
Your
students
will
do
a
project.
You
download
images
 
 No
 and
photos
from
various
non‐commercial
websites
and
 store
them

in
a
WebCT
folder

for
the
students
to
view.
 No.
You
can
download
and
store
images
on
an
educational
network
that
 is
password­protected,
as
long
as
you
include
a
copyright
notice
that
 informs
students
they
cannot
print,
publish,
download,
share.
BUT
 you
cannot
upload
them
back
to
the
public
web.
 16.
You
assign
a
multimedia
project
to
your
students.
They
 Yes
 No
 combine
text,
video,
audio
and
images

and
create
a
video
 on
YouTube.
 Maybe.
Students
are
required
to
adhere
to
the
same
copyright
rules
as
 faculty.
Assuming
students
have
followed
the
copyright
rules
in
creating
 the
projects,
they
are
not
in
violation.
But
if
they
have
not
secured
 permissions
or
sufficiently
altered
copyrighted
materials,
this
is
 infringement.

 17.
You’re
in
the
library
reading
an
interesting
article
in
 
 No
 the
latest
issue
of
a
journal
in
your
discipline
and
you’d
 like
to
incorporate
the
research
into
your
online
class
 lecture
notes.
You
make
a
photocopy
of
the
article
to
take
 Office
of
Educational
Enhancement
(OEE)
–
972­883­6960
–
oee@utdallas.edu
–
http://oee.utdallas.edu
–
HH
2.406

  • 6. home
with
you
to
prepare
the
lecture.

 No.
As
long
as
you
don’t
reproduce
the
article
for
your
students
or
others.
 You
are
allowed
to
make
a
single
copy
for
your
use
in
preparation
or
in
 scholarly
research.
If
you
use
a
quote,
you
must
cite
it
properly.

 18.

Several
of
your
students
haven’t
got
the
textbook
yet.

 Yes
 
 You
make
a
scan
of
the
first
chapter
for
them
so
they
 won’t
get
behind
and
post
it
online
in
Blackboard.
 Yes.
You
can
make
a
single
copy
of
a
book
chapter
for
yourself
for
your
 use
in
preparation
or
in
scholarly
research.
However,
you
cannot
scan
 and
publish
any
portion
of
a
text
that
is
intended
specifically
for
 educational
use.

 19.
You
record
yourself
and
a
few
friends
reading
Hamlet.
 
 No
 You
post
the
audio
file
in
several
clips
online.

 Probably
not.

Hamlet
is
in
the
public
domain.
BUT
you
could
not
read
or
 act
or
show
The
Lion
King,
as
it
is
still
under
copyright
protection.

 20.
You’re
teaching
an
online
class.
You
need
an
picture
of
 
 No
 the
Eiffel
Tower.
You
go
to
the
library
and
find
a
book
of
 images
published
in
1918.
You
check
it
out,
go
home
and
 scan
a
picture.
You
place
this
image
on
your
faculty
 webpage.
 Probably
not.
It
doesn’t
matter
that
you
put
the
image
on
a
public
 webpage.
The
book
was
published
more
than
90
years
ago
­
it
has
fallen
 into
public
domain.
However,
the
image
may
still
be
under
copyright
to
 someone
other
than
the
publisher
(for
example
 
 Office
of
Educational
Enhancement
(OEE)
–
972­883­6960
–
oee@utdallas.edu
–
http://oee.utdallas.edu
–
HH
2.406