Promoting Civility in Our Classrooms
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Promoting Civility in Our Classrooms

on

  • 1,551 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,551
Views on SlideShare
1,548
Embed Views
3

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0

2 Embeds 3

http://www.slideshare.net 2
http://class.sjcny.edu 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Promoting Civility in Our Classrooms Promoting Civility in Our Classrooms Presentation Transcript

  • Promoting Civility in our Classrooms G.I.F.T.S. Conference NHMCCD April 28, 2006
  • Objectives
    • Participants will define civility and incivility.
    • Participants will explore their perceptions of civility.
    • Participants will understand causes and reasons for student incivility.
    • Participants will learn strategies to foster civility.
  • Consider
    • Civil students …
    • Civil instructors …
    • Uncivil students …
    • Uncivil instructors…
    • Civility is the responsibility of …
  • What is incivility?
    • Any action that interferes with a harmonious, cooperative learning atmosphere in the classroom
    • Feldmann, 2001
    • Disruptive behavior is rebellious, emotional, escalating
    • Hernandez & Fister, 2001
  • Origins of Incivility
    • Psychological factors
    • Need to express power over another
    • Need for verbal release due to frustra-tion over unresolved situation
    • Need to obtain something of value
    • Feldman, 2001
  • Why Address Incivility?
    • Ethical duty
    • Personal protection
  • Who is Responsible?
    • Classroom Climate
    • Classroom = social environment
    • Must be safe & coercion free
  • Interaction & Learning
    • Student peers influence classroom norms
    • Supportive classroom -  participation
    • Student participation - intellectual skill development
    • High incidences of incivilities affect student perception of own development
  • Rapport & Incivility
    • Lowman’s typology
    • Low rapport -> cold, distant, controlling
    • Instructor -> little interest in students, sarcastic, disdainful
    • Students -> low motivation to learn, significant anxiety, anger
  • Disruption
    • Student perception of their treatment by instructor and other students
    • Sense of security
    • Perception of classroom as comfort zone
    • Quality of interpersonal rapport
  • What is Uncivil Behavior?
    • As perceived by…
    • Students and instructors
    • Instructors
    • Students
  • Students & Instructors
    • Converse loudly enough to distract the class’ attention
    • Make loud, sarcastic remarks or expressions of discontent
    • Make unpredictable or emotional outbursts
    • Lloyd Feldmann, Purdue University
  • Instructors
    • Do not participate or express interest
    • Come to class unprepared
    • Demand extended deadlines, makeups
    • Disruptively arrive late or leave early
  • Students
    • Present fast-paced lectures with little interaction
    • Seem cold, distant, uncaring, make negative remarks
    • Surprise them with unexpected test items and grades
    • Arrive late, cancel class w/o warning
    • Allow students to taunt, belittle others
  • Create a Positive Environment
    • Define expectations
    • Reduce student anonymity
    • Seek feedback from students
    • Encourage active learning
    • Sorcinelli, 1994
  • Categories of Uncivil Behavior
    • Annoyances
    • Classroom terrorism
    • Intimidation
    • Physical threats
  • Responding to Incivility
    • Category 1 - annoyances
    • Ask student to stop
    • Examine your lesson delivery
      • Boice study = instructors frequently were initiators
      • Ask for observation
      • Videotape class
  • Responding to Incivility
    • Category 2 - classroom terrorism
    • Stay calm
    • Ask student to stop
    • Discuss action privately
    • Ask student to leave
    • Dismiss class
  • Responding to Incivility
    • Category 3 - emotional blackmail
    • Stay calm, analytical
    • Discuss privately
    • Discuss factors that generate action
    • Do not allow escalation
  • Responding to Incivility
    • Category 4 - violent threats or actions
    • Stay calm, don’t show reaction
    • Get away from situation, student
    • Classroom - break, another instructor, police
    • Office - another person, door open
  • Strategies - Proactive
    • Set the tone for mutual responsibility
    • Create a safe climate
    • Establish expectations
    • Express immediacy with prosocial motivators
    • Use administrative measures
    • Do not allow unacceptable behavior, comments to pass
  • Document Incivility
    • Document each instance
    • Analytical, factual, free of judgment
    • Write immediately after incident
    • Make chair aware
  • Checklist - handout
    • Describe problem clearly
    • Understanding the reasons for the behavior
    • Modifying instructor and student behavior
    • General characteristics
  • Thank you
    • Please complete the evaluation of this session. Your feedback is important.