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Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
Investment in yourself
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Investment in yourself

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  • 1. Investment in Yourself 1.1.9 Family Economics & Financial Education Take Charge of Your Finances
  • 2. Influences• Value a fundamental belief or practice about what is desirable, worthwhile, and important to an individual.• Goal the end result of something a person intends to acquire, do, reach, or accomplish sometime in the near or distant future.• Need something thought to be a necessity• Want something unnecessary but desired © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself - slide2 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 3. Human Capital• Human Capital skills acquired through a process of self investment.• What are examples of things you can do to increase human capital? Summer jobs Volunteer Extra-curricular activities © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself – slide 3 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 4. Education vs. Income Higher Education = Higher Estimated Lifetime Earnings“Education is essential in getting a high-paying job. In fact, for all but 1 of the 50 highest paying occupations, a college degree or higher is the most significant source of education or training. Air traffic controller is the only occupation of the 50 highest paying for which this is not the case”2004 Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook, Tomorrows Jobs © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself – slide 4 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 5. Education vs. Income ActivityStand up with your colored square “Everyone standing represents the people who started high school. This activity will show the different paths people can choose during their lifetime and the different results.”Based upon 2007 US Bureau of Labor Statistics Data © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself – slide 5 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 6. Education vs Income Percentage of Percentage of State U.S. Average Educational Attainment U.S. Population Populatio Income (2007) (2007) n Not high school graduate $33,913 15.2% %High school graduate including GED $46,938 25.2% % Some college no degree $54,881 21.8% % Associate degree $64,537 8.9% % Bachelor’s degree $88,948 18.7% %Master’s, doctoral, professional degree $115,179 10.2% % © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself – slide 6 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 7. Traits of successful workersTraits employers seek include: Extra curricular activities Member of school organization Part time jobPossible job sources Internet Newspaper Networking © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself - slide7 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona
  • 8. ReviewDegree levels How long does it take to obtain each degree? What is an example of a job you can get with each degree?What traits do employers look for in employees?What are sources to use to find a job? © Family Economics & Financial Education – May 2009 – Career Development Unit – Investment in Yourself - slide8 Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences Take Charge America Institute at The University of Arizona

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