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Career research power point 1.1.2.g1

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  • 1. Career Research 1.1.2
    Family Economics and Financial Education
    Take Charge of Your Finances
  • 2. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 2
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Making an informed Career Decision
    Includes an self evaluation of interests
    Making future career projections
    Selecting personal goals
    Goals are the end result of something a person intends to acquire, achieve, do, reach, or accomplish sometime in the near or distant future
    Short-term goals are accomplished within one year
    Long-term goals are accomplished in more then one year
  • 3. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 3
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Career vs. Job
    What is the difference between a job and a career?
    Career
    A commitment to a profession which requires continued training and offers a clear path for occupational growth
    Example: Educator
    Job
    An employment position obtained mainly to earn money
    Example: Gas Station Attendant
  • 4. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 4
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Job Opportunities
    Pick a career path with job opportunities in the future
    Three main factors influencing future job opportunities
    Population
    Labor force
    Demand for goods and services
  • 5. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 5
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Factors
    Population affects the size of the labor force
    Affects the quantity of goods produced
    Demand for goods and services determines employment within industries
  • 6. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 6
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Resources
    Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Outlook Handbook
    www.bls.gov
    For hundreds of different jobs the handbook tells you:
    The training and education needed
    Earnings
    Expected job prospects
    What workers do on the job
    Working conditions
  • 7. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 7
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Education training
  • 8. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 8
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 9. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 9
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 10. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 10
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 11. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 11
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 12. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 12
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Largest Numerical Increases in Occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 13. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 13
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Fact
    Among the 20 fastest growing occupations, a bachelor’s or associate degree is the most significant source of postsecondary education or training for 12 of them!
  • 14. Healthcare occupations comprise 12 of the 20 fastest growing occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 15. Computer occupations account for 5 out of the 20 fastest growing occupations
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 16. Occupations projected to Grow Fastest,2004-2014
    In groups of 2-3 hypothesize why health care positions and computer/technology positions are growing so fast
    These combined jobs will add more than 1.8 million new jobs
    Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Handbook – Tomorrow’s Jobs December 2005
  • 17. Increases in employment: health education, sales, transportation, office
    and administrative support, and food service
  • 18. Job Declines projected 2004-2014
    Declining occupational employment stems from:
    declining industry employment
    technological advancements
    changes in business practices
    The majority of declines are office and administrative support and production occupations
    Increasing plant and factory automation
    Implementation of office technology
  • 19. Job Declines in Occupations with the largest numerical decreases in Employment,projected 2004-2014
  • 20. © Family Economics & Financial Education – Revised April 2008 – Career Development Unit – Career Research – Slide 20
    Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
    Researching a Career
    Questions that you should ask:
    Are there opportunities for advancement?
    What are the educational requirements?
    Does it pay enough?
    What are the working conditions?

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